"Viewscape of Harriet Tubman residence and barn" by NPS Photo , public domain

Harriet Tubman

National Historical Park - New York

Harriet Tubman National Historical Park is a US historical park in Auburn and Fleming, New York, associated with the life of Harriet Tubman. It comprises three properties: the Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged, in Auburn; the nearby Harriet Tubman Residence (just across the city/town line in Fleming); and the Thompson A.M.E. Zion Church in Auburn. The Harriet Tubman Grave in nearby Fort Hill Cemetery is not part of the park. Tubman was a major conductor on the Underground Railroad, and known as "the Moses of her people".

maps

Map of the Underground Railroad routes that freedom seekers would take to reach freedom. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Underground Railroad - Routes to Freedom

Map of the Underground Railroad routes that freedom seekers would take to reach freedom. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Harriet Tubman NHP https://www.nps.gov/hart/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Tubman_National_Historical_Park Harriet Tubman National Historical Park is a US historical park in Auburn and Fleming, New York, associated with the life of Harriet Tubman. It comprises three properties: the Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged, in Auburn; the nearby Harriet Tubman Residence (just across the city/town line in Fleming); and the Thompson A.M.E. Zion Church in Auburn. The Harriet Tubman Grave in nearby Fort Hill Cemetery is not part of the park. Tubman was a major conductor on the Underground Railroad, and known as "the Moses of her people". Harriet Tubman was guided by a deep faith and devotion to family, freedom, and community. After emancipating herself and members of her family, she moved them from Ontario, Canada to Fleming and Auburn, New York in 1859. Central New York was a center for progressive thought, abolition, and women’s suffrage where Tubman continued to fight for human rights and dignity until she died in 1913. The Harriet Tubman National Historical Park includes the Thompson Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, the Harriet Tubman Visitor Center, the Tubman Home for the Aged, and the Harriet Tubman Residence. A related Tubman site that lies outside of the national historical park is the Fort Hill Cemetery where Tubman is buried. View directions to each of these five sites on our directions page. Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged White single family home with front porch. Part of Tubman's Auburn farm, this building helped shelter the needy. Thompson Memorial AME Zion Church Wooden church with tall steeple Located near Tubman's home, the church continues to honor Tubman's legacy of freedom. Tubman Grave Headstone of Harriet Tubman Tubman grave at Fort Hill Cemetery Harriet Tubman Residence Brick building surrounded by autumn trees Tubman's Auburn residence. Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad In 1849 Harriet Tubman took her fate into her own hands and escaped slavery. Over approximately a decade, Tubman returned to Maryland to rescue about 70 more enslaved people including her family and friends. Tubman stands alongside her family members. Harriet Tubman National Historical Park Hosts Its First Naturalization Ceremony Harriet Tubman National Historical Park (NHP), in partnership with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), held the first naturalization ceremony on the grounds of the National Park Service’s legislative partner, Harriet Tubman Home, Inc., on August 8. A group of people stand as they are being sworn in as United States citizens. North Star to Freedom The National Park Service shares the stories of Harriet Tubman, the Underground Railroad, and the many brave Americans in the 1800s whose courageous actions led slaves to freedom and helped end the slavery era. This July as we celebrate our nation’s independence, the NPS reflects on the role the night sky played in the lives of these early Americans. Painting of escaping slaves on horseback, The Fugitive Slaves, Eastman Johnson Disability History: The NPS and Accessibility The National Park Service strives to make its parks, monuments, and historic sites available to all. Programs, services, and products, such as Braille alternatives of print material, sign language interpretation of tours, accessible camping sites and trails, ramps and elevators make parks more accessible. These are essential to allowing the public to fully enjoy NPS resources. exterior of a log cabin Re-Imagining Harriet Tubman A previously unknown photograph of Harriet Tubman depicting her as young and stylish, closer to what she would have looked like during her days as an operative of the Underground Railroad was acquired in 2017. 2019 marked the debut of the movie Harriet. Find out how this historical figure is being re-imagined as a historical superhero. Suffrage in 60 Seconds: African American Women and the Vote African American women often found themselves marginalized by both Black men and white women in the fight for equality. How did they ensure that their voices were heard? Ranger Titus has the story. Photo collage of several African American suffragists. Suffrage in 60 Seconds logo Series: Disability History The Disability History series brings attention to some of the many disability stories interwoven across the National Park Service’s 400+ units and its programs. “Disability stories” refer to the array of experiences by, from, and about people with disabilities represented across our nation. People with disabilities are the largest minority in the United States, but their stories often remain untold. Statue of FDR in his wheelchair Series: Suffrage in Sixty Seconds When was the last time you voted? For the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution enfranchising women, park rangers at the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument created these one-minute videos that highlight suffrage subjects and the heroes who made woman suffrage a reality—including those women who continued the fight for full enfranchisement beyond 1920. Alice Paul raises glass above ratification banner Beyond beautiful places, the National Park Service protects our nation's emancipation sites and stories As we celebrate Juneteenth, it is equally important to recognize the role that the enslaved had in their own emancipation. The National Park Service has the honor of protecting sacred places and histories for the American people, many of which explore enslavement, emancipation, and the fight for equality that are integral to the American experience.

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