"Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center at sunrise" by NPS Photo/ Beth Parnicza , public domain

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad

National Historical Park - Maryland

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park is located in Maryland. It commemorates the life of former slave Harriet Tubman, who became an activist in the Underground Railroad prior to the American Civil War.

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Map of the Underground Railroad routes that freedom seekers would take to reach freedom. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Underground Railroad - Routes to Freedom

Map of the Underground Railroad routes that freedom seekers would take to reach freedom. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/hatu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harriet_Tubman_Underground_Railroad_National_Historical_Park Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park is located in Maryland. It commemorates the life of former slave Harriet Tubman, who became an activist in the Underground Railroad prior to the American Civil War. Harriet Tubman was a deeply spiritual woman who lived her ideals and dedicated her life to freedom. She is the Underground Railroad’s best known conductor and before the Civil War repeatedly risked her life to guide 70 enslaved people north to new lives of freedom. This new national historical park preserves the same landscapes that Tubman used to carry herself and others away from slavery. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center is located approximately 11 miles south of Cambridge, Maryland. From US 50, turn south on Route 16. Follow Route 16 to Church Creek about 7 miles; turn south on Route 335 / Golden Hill Road. Follow Route 335 about 4.5 miles, and the visitor center is on the right. Latitude/Longitude: 38.4445934, -76.1426984 Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center Operated in partnership with the Maryland Park Service, this visitor center considers the life and legacy of Harriet Tubman, born a slave here in Dorchester County, Maryland. Tubman escaped her condition of slavery and returned to Maryland to bring more than 70 relatives and friends to freedom using the Underground Railroad network. Experience the landscape that colored Tubman's early life, and explore exhibits and a film to learn more about her compelling story. Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Site Girl stands on a bridge overlooking the marshlands. Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Site Journeying toward Freedom and New Beginnings The Jacob Jackson home site is a landscape associated with Harriet Tubman's youth on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. In 1854, Jacob Jackson a free black man and friend of Harriet Tubman helped her to free her brothers from slavery. Jacob and Harriet were part of the White Marsh community of free and enslaved black families, many of whom worked to resist, in their own ways, entrenched systems of slavery and discrimination. A narrow canal of water passes through a marshy area of low vegetation, bordered by trees. National Park Getaway: Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park tells the story of how one person can fight injustice despite being born into the worst of circumstances. The visitor center and surrounding area help visitors appreciate Harriet Tubman’s courage, sacrifices, and enduring legacy. Reenactors portraying Harriet Tubman and the 54th U.S. Army Regiment Designing the Parks: Learning in Action The Designing the Parks program is not your typical internship. Each year since 2013, this program at the Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation has introduced a cohort of college students and recent graduates to NPS design and planning professions through projects related to cultural landscape stewardship. In the internships, made possible by partner organizations, participants focus on an in-depth project that directly engages with a national park unit. A group of young people stand on forest trail and listen to two maintenance employees Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center Celebrates Grand Opening The National Park Service and the Maryland Park Service jointly dedicated and opened the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center in Church Creek, Maryland on March 10-12. The facility serves as the joint visitor center for the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park and the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad State Park. An older African American woman is dressed as Harriet Tubman. Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad In 1849 Harriet Tubman took her fate into her own hands and escaped slavery. Over approximately a decade, Tubman returned to Maryland to rescue about 70 more enslaved people including her family and friends. Tubman stands alongside her family members. The Niagara River: Between Slavery and Freedom Niagara Falls, one of the seven natural wonders of the world, is often thought of as awe-inspiring and a must-do tourist destination for people from all over the world. The power of Niagara Falls is more than the natural phenomenon of the Falls themselves, or the harnessing of the hydropower of the Niagara River, but importantly, the tension between slavery and freedom during the years of the Underground Railroad. Color postcard of a train crossing the suspension bridge at Niagara Falls Maryland: Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park Today considered a national hero, Tubman is best known for her role in assisting approximately 70 enslaved African Americans escape to freedom as a leading “conductor” of the Underground Railroad – a resistance movement based on self-liberation and flight. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park memorializes this legacy not through physical structures, but by instead through the landscape in Tubman’s native Dorchester County, Maryland. Harriet Tubman, full length portrait North Star to Freedom The National Park Service shares the stories of Harriet Tubman, the Underground Railroad, and the many brave Americans in the 1800s whose courageous actions led slaves to freedom and helped end the slavery era. This July as we celebrate our nation’s independence, the NPS reflects on the role the night sky played in the lives of these early Americans. Painting of escaping slaves on horseback, The Fugitive Slaves, Eastman Johnson Disability History: The NPS and Accessibility The National Park Service strives to make its parks, monuments, and historic sites available to all. Programs, services, and products, such as Braille alternatives of print material, sign language interpretation of tours, accessible camping sites and trails, ramps and elevators make parks more accessible. These are essential to allowing the public to fully enjoy NPS resources. exterior of a log cabin The Underground Railroad and Network to Freedom Learn about Harriet Tubman's connection to the Eastern Shore. (September 2019) tall brown grass by lake with trees in the background Re-Imagining Harriet Tubman A previously unknown photograph of Harriet Tubman depicting her as young and stylish, closer to what she would have looked like during her days as an operative of the Underground Railroad was acquired in 2017. 2019 marked the debut of the movie Harriet. Find out how this historical figure is being re-imagined as a historical superhero. Suffrage in 60 Seconds: African American Women and the Vote African American women often found themselves marginalized by both Black men and white women in the fight for equality. How did they ensure that their voices were heard? Ranger Titus has the story. Photo collage of several African American suffragists. Suffrage in 60 Seconds logo Series: Disability History The Disability History series brings attention to some of the many disability stories interwoven across the National Park Service’s 400+ units and its programs. “Disability stories” refer to the array of experiences by, from, and about people with disabilities represented across our nation. People with disabilities are the largest minority in the United States, but their stories often remain untold. Statue of FDR in his wheelchair Series: Suffrage in Sixty Seconds When was the last time you voted? For the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution enfranchising women, park rangers at the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument created these one-minute videos that highlight suffrage subjects and the heroes who made woman suffrage a reality—including those women who continued the fight for full enfranchisement beyond 1920. Alice Paul raises glass above ratification banner Beyond beautiful places, the National Park Service protects our nation's emancipation sites and stories As we celebrate Juneteenth, it is equally important to recognize the role that the enslaved had in their own emancipation. The National Park Service has the honor of protecting sacred places and histories for the American people, many of which explore enslavement, emancipation, and the fight for equality that are integral to the American experience.

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