"Halema‘uma‘u lava lake" by NPS/J. Wei , public domain

Hawaiʻi Volcanoes

National Park - Hawaiʻi

Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is located in the U.S. state of Hawaii on the island of Hawaii. The park encompasses two active volcanoes: Kīlauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, and Mauna Loa, the world's most massive shield volcano. For visitors, the park offers dramatic volcanic landscapes, as well as glimpses of rare flora and fauna. Check before your visit what sections of the park are open for the public!

maps

Official visitor map of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park (NP) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hawaiʻi Volcanoes - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park (NP) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail (NHT) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Ala Kahakai - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail (NHT) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Driving Map of the Island of Hawaiʻi (Hawaii). Published by the Hawaii Tourism Authority.Hawaiʻi - Driving Map

Driving Map of the Island of Hawaiʻi (Hawaii). Published by the Hawaii Tourism Authority.

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii South 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Hawaiʻi - Vintage USGS Map - Hawaii South 1951

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii South 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/havo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaiʻi_Volcanoes_National_Park Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is located in the U.S. state of Hawaii on the island of Hawaii. The park encompasses two active volcanoes: Kīlauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, and Mauna Loa, the world's most massive shield volcano. For visitors, the park offers dramatic volcanic landscapes, as well as glimpses of rare flora and fauna. Check before your visit what sections of the park are open for the public! Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park protects some of the most unique geological, biological, and cherished cultural landscapes in the world. Extending from sea level to 13,677 feet, the park encompasses the summits of two of the world's most active volcanoes - Kīlauea and Mauna Loa - and is a designated International Biosphere Reserve and UNESCO World Heritage Site. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is located on the island of Hawai‘i. From Hilo: 30 miles southwest on Highway 11 (a 45 minute drive); from Kailua-Kona: 96 miles southeast on Highway 11 (2 to 2 1/2 hour drive), or 125 miles through Waimea and Hilo via highways 19 and 11 (2 1/2 to 3 hours). Kahuku Visitor Contact Station Located at the Kahuku Unit of the park in the district of Kaʻū, the Kahuku Visitor Contact Station provides park information, assistance, and books and gifts available through Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association. Kahuku is located in the district of Kaʻū, near mile-marker 70.5 on Highway 11, a one-hour drive from Kīlauea Visitor Center. Kīlauea Visitor Center Make Kīlauea Visitor Center your first stop when entering the park. Rangers and volunteers are on duty in the visitor center daily and will provide visitors with the latest information on the current eruption, hiking information, things to do and the daily schedule of ranger-led activities. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is located on the island of Hawai‘i. From Hilo: 30 miles southwest on Highway 11 (a 45 minute drive); from Kailua-Kona: 96 miles southeast on Highway 11 (2 to 2 1/2 hour drive), or 125 miles through Waimea and Hilo via highways 19 and 11 (2 1/2 to 3 hours). Kīlauea Visitor Center is a short distance from the park entrance on the right. Kulanaokuaiki Kulanaokuaiki is located off Hilina Pali Road at 3,200 feet (975 m), there are nine walk-in campsites with picnic tables. There is an accessible vault toilet; however, no water is available and campfires are not permitted. Use fueled camping stoves only. This campground is subject to closure when the area is dry and during times of high fire risk. No dogs or pets are allowed at this campground to protect endangered nene. Per site 10.00 There is a self pay station at the campground Kulanaokuaiki Campground Primitive campsite Primitive campsite Kulanaokuiki Campground Visitors looking at Mauna Loa from a campsite Kualanaokuiki Campground on the slopes of Kīlauea Kulanaokuiki Campground Visitors at a campsite Kualanaokuiki Campground Kulanaokuaiki Campground View of campground and accessible vault toilet View of campground and accessible vault toilet Nāmakanipaio Nāmakanipaio Campground is located 31.5 miles south of Hilo on Highway-11 at 4,000' elevation. It is a large, open grassy area with tall eucalyptus and 'ōhi'a trees. This campground has restrooms, water, picnic tables and barbecue pits. Campfires are permitted in the barbeque pits only. If there are more than 2 people in your party, you can expand to 4 people per site with another tent. Maximum stay is 7 days. Per tent site 15.00 There is a self pay station at the campground. Park entrance fees also apply which are paid at the park entrance station or the after hours self pay station on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lanai. Nāmakanipaio Campsite Tent camping Tent camping Nāmakanipaio Campsite Campsite with picnic table and firepit Campsite with picnic table and firepit Nāmakanipaio Campground View of Nāmakanipaio Campground View of Nāmakanipaio Campground Nāmakanipaio Campground Pavilion Nāmakanipaio Campground Pavilion Nāmakanipaio Campground Pavilion Nāmakanipaio Campground Restrooms Restrooms at Nāmakanipaio Campground Nāmakanipaio Campground Pavilion Halapē Rocky coastline with palm trees and a cliff beyon Coastline of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Kīlauea Iki A cloud-filled volcanic crater at sunrise with a mountain rising behind Sunrise at Kīlauea Iki Hōlei Pali Lava flows and ferns in front of a cliff at sunset Lava flows from the Mauna Ulu eruption drape the Hōlei Pali Steam Vents Trees and tall grass through steam at sunrise Wahinekapu (Steaming Bluff) The Kahuku Unit Grassy hill dotted with trees underneath a blue sky with white clouds The Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park once was one of the largest cattle ranches in Hawaiʻi Tide Pools Green vegetation in tide pools on a rocky ocean coastline Tide pools along the Puna Coast Nāhuku A lava tube lit by warm electric light Nāhuku (Thurston Lava Tube) Lava Trees A lava tree in a black lava field with small living trees and a rainbow behind Lava trees memorialize trees that once stood in the path of encroaching lava ʻAe Fern Ferns rising from a lava field About 200 species of ferns can be found across the Hawaiian Islands. Sixty-five percent of these species are considered endemic, found nowhere else in the world. ʻŌhiʻa Red ʻōhiʻa blossom The red blossoms of the ʻōhiʻa are a Hawaiian cultural icon Nēnē Nēnē spreading winds on edge of a crater The threatened nēnē is the official state bird of Hawaiʻi Rainforest Rays of light shine through a misty rainforest with ferns covering the understory Lush rainforest surrounds Crater Rim Trail near the Halemaʻumaʻu Trail Hula at Kīlauea A hula dancer in a red dress above a forested area Kīlauea is home to important and sacred cultural sites stretching back centuries. Mauna Loa 1940 Cone A lava cone rising behind a flow of lava with caldera walls beyond Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on the planet, stands more than 13,000 feet above sea level Puʻu Loa Petroglyphs Petroglyphs of human figures carved into gray rock Puʻu Loa features the largest group of petroglyphs in Hawaiʻi. Halemaʻumaʻu Crater A tree stands on the edge of a misty caldera Halemaʻumaʻu from along Crater Rim Trail NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Army Couple Visits 59 National Parks When you’re a dual-military couple, it can be a challenge to try to find things to do together, especially when you’re at separate duty stations or on deployment. For one Army couple, what started out as a simple idea to get out of the house turned into a five-year adventure. Couple standing in front of The Windows at Arches National Park. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, Hawai'i Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] hot lava Veteran Story: Kekoa Rosehill Kekoa Rosehill joined the U.S. Marines on September 12, 2001. He got his first permanent job using the Pathways Recent Graduate hiring authority. Today, he is a supervisory park ranger at Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Kekoa Rosehill in camouflage face paint and military fatigues. Park Air Profiles - Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park Air quality profile for Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Hawai'i Volcanoes NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Hawai'i Volcanoes NP. Lava flow field in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park Kilauea Historic District Cultural Landscape The Kilauea Administration and Employee Housing Historic District is located along Crater Rim Drive, approximately one quarter-mile west of the Hilo entrance station of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Developed along the relatively dormant northeast edge of Kilauea Caldera, this 43-acre historic district is located within a dense, native ohia forest. employee house Voices of Science: The Rarest Goose in the World The Hawaiian Goose, or nēnē, is the rarest goose in the world. It’s found only in the state of Hawaii. In the 1950’s, the species was on the brink of extinction. With the help of biologists like Kathleen Misajon in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, the nēnē population is rebounding. A pair of black and white striped birds Voices of Science: Night Skies in Hawai'i Volcanoes For generations, night skies have inspired those who choose to look up. They helped the original Polynesian wayfinders find their way across the sea. They inspire the visitors that join night sky programs in national parks. They're also important to sensitive species in the wild. In Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, you can appreciate the stars like nowhere else on the planet. And the park is working hard to keep it that way. A star filled sky above a person in shadow Climate Change Clues from Monitoring As climate changes, significant changes in weather conditions impact the natural environment by shifting patterns of precipitation, promoting extremes in storm behavior, and influencing bird migration, invasive species spread, coral reef decline, and much more. The Pacific Island Network (PACN) undertakes systematic long-term monitoring of a wide variety of natural resources to accurately determine if change is occurring and why. Precipitation seen over the lush valleys of Kalaupapa National Historical Park. Sea Level Rise & Anchialine Pools Anchialine pools are brackish coastal ecosystems without a surface connection to the ocean, where groundwater and ocean water (from underground) mix. In Hawai‘i, groundwater flows through these pools and out to wetlands and coral reefs making them valuable indicators of broad-scale groundwater recharge and contamination. An anchialine pool in Pu‘uhonua O Hōnaunau National Park Potential impacts of projected climate change on vegetation management in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park Natural resource managers at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park want to know how climate change, and increased temperatures and variable rainfall will alter plant distributions, especially in the Special Ecological Areas (SEAs), which are focal sites for managing rare and endangered plants. A flowering shrub growing in a barre lava field Voices of Science: The Coquistador A noisy little amphibian is causing quite the ruckus on Hawaii Island - the invasive coqui frog. Coming all the way from Puerto Rico, the coqui frog has invaded Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Coqui threaten the native ecosystems and shatter the natural soundscapes in the park. But The Coquistador is on the case! Biological Resource Technician Kim Dilman works by night, removing frogs from the landscape to protect sensitive areas and preserve the native, natural resources. A small red frog sitting on a reddish green leaf Voices of Science: Lava and Change Some of the biggest changes on Hawai’i come from the active volcano on the island. Lava flowing across the island incinerates everything in its path. But lava also creates new land. Land that will eventually support species and habitats found nowhere else on earth. Gray and red lava on top of black hardened lava Early Detection Pilot Studies Pacific Islands Inventory & Monitoring Network performs an early detection pilot study at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and Haleakalā National Park to document the presence of non-native and invasive plant species. I&M is evaluating the effectiveness of this study to enhance the Early Detection of Invasive Plants protocol and the feasibility of instituting early detection at a larger scale throughout these and other the Pacific island national parks. Monitoring invasive kahili ginger at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Building Capacity for Rare Plants in Hawai‘i The National Park Service at Haleakalā and Hawai‘i Volcanoes have combined resources and know-how to give three dozen species a fighting chance to remain viable in the midst of climate change. Two observers admire a rare flowering Trematolobelia wimmeri, endemic to Hawai‘i Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal Holo Mai Pele (The Journey of Pele) The storied journey of the volcano deity Pele to her home in Halemaʻumaʻu crater on the island of Hawaiʻi The Despotic Chiefs of Kaʻū There were once three despotic chiefs who lived in Kaʻū, on the southern portion of the Island of Hawaiʻi. These are the tales that are told about them. Legend of The Gourd A legend of one ‘ohana in Kaʻū is the story of a young couple who wanted to marry, but whose parents disapproved. ʻŌhiʻa Many Hawaiian moʻolelo involve the ʻōhiʻa tree and its bright, fiery flowers Kamapuaʻa Oral history tells us of the unique birth of a child named Kamapuaʻa or the “hog-child” Punaʻaikoaʻe The kinolau (body form) of the Oʻahu chief Punaʻaikoaʻe can be seen as the koaʻekea, flying over Kīlauea. Pele & Lonomakua How the Hawaiian volcanic deity Pele came to govern fire Pele & Hiʻiaka According to Hawaiian tradition, a battle between the volcano deity Pele and her sister Hiʻiaka took place at the summit of Kīlauea Kaʻehuikimanōopuʻuloa A moʻolelo taking place at Puʻu Loa along the Pānau coast of Kīlauea volcano Crater Rim Historic District Cultural Landscape Crater Rim Historic District, located in and around Kilauea Caldera in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, is significant for associations with early park planning and the Civilian Conservation Corps. It is an example of the naturalistic landscape architecture style perpetuated by the NPS between the First and Second World Wars. The features that were designed to highlight and provide access to this unique volcanic landscape can still be experienced by visitors today. A man leans over a carefully-constructed stone wall, framing a view of a mountainous landscape. Ainahou Ranch House and Gardens Cultural Landscape The 'Ainahou Ranch House and Gardens is located within Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, approximately four miles south and down slope from Kilauea Caldera. The 13.3-acre historic site sits within a native mesic forest at an elevation of 3000 feet. Within this forest, gardens that surround a unique craftsman house create an exotic setting which reflects the site's development by renowned horticulturalist, Herbert C. Shipman from 1941 to 1971. Ranch House Three Big Changes in Three Years at Halemaʻumaʻu Crater From lava to water and back again. Three big changes have occurred at Halemaʻumaʻu crater in three years. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Pele The Hawaiian volcano deity and creator of volcanic landscapes Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Scientists Examine Why Some Pacific Islands National Parks Have More Non-native Plants than Others Invasive non-native species represent one of the main threats to vulnerable island biodiversity. But why do some national parks in the Pacific Islands have more non-native plant species than others? Scientists examined how native plant communities, environment, and geography are associated with non-native plant species invasion across national parks in the Pacific islands to help understand this threat. Yellow flowers of non-native Kahili ginger blanket a forest floor. The First Woman Ranger at Hawai’i National Park Yellowstone wasn’t the only park to have a woman ranger in 1922. That same year, M. Lydia Barrette became the first temporary women ranger at Hawai’i National Park (now Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park and Haleakalā National Park). Lydia Barrett 1922 Blanket Cave National Youth Park—Activity Enjoy a fun activity and learn about caves even when you can't get out to a park. In this activity you will build your own cave and learn how to make it like a "real" natural cave. Find out about cave formations and wildlife, and how to be safe and care for caves. New "Blanket Cave National Youth Parks" are springing up all across America! Join the fun! cartoon drawing of a childs and a park ranger exploring a cave Substitute Rangers As the 1940s dawned, the United States was still dealing with the economic woes of the Great Depression and trying not to get drawn in WWII. Even as it continued to manage New Deal Program work in national and state parks, the NPS remained understaffed as a government bureau. The emergency relief workers and about 15 percent of NPS staff enlisted or were drafted during the first couple of years of WWII. Winifred Tada, 1940. (Courtesy of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin) Plan Like a Ranger this Summer at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Plan Like a Park Ranger at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park Visitors view the coast line of Hawaiʻi from a wooden overlook.

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