"Gravesite of Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Herbert Hoover

National Historic Site - Iowa

The Herbert Hoover National Historic Site is in West Branch, Iowa, United States. The buildings and grounds are managed by the National Park Service to commemorate the life of Herbert Hoover, the 31st President of the United States.

maps

Official visitor map of Herbert Hoover National Historic Site (NHS) in Iowa. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Herbert Hoover - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Herbert Hoover National Historic Site (NHS) in Iowa. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/heho/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Hoover_National_Historic_Site The Herbert Hoover National Historic Site is in West Branch, Iowa, United States. The buildings and grounds are managed by the National Park Service to commemorate the life of Herbert Hoover, the 31st President of the United States. Orphaned at age nine, Herbert Hoover left West Branch never to live here again. In later years, he returned to his humble birthplace to celebrate his long career of public service. A memorial landscape remains to tell his story: how community, hard work, honesty, and usefulness to others opened a world of opportunity— and the presidency of the United States— to a child of simple beginnings. Take exit 254 off Interstate 80 to West Branch, Iowa. The Visitor Center is 0.3 mile north of Interstate 80. Visitor Center Start your visit at the Visitor Center, where park rangers are available to answer questions and help you get oriented. Allow yourself about 30 minutes in the Visitor Center, which is open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily. Take exit 254 off Interstate 80 to West Branch, Iowa. The Visitor Center is 0.3 mile north of Interstate 80. Herbert Hoover Birthplace Cottage A one story wood frame house has board-and-batten exterior siding and a picket fence painted white. Herbert Hoover called his humble birthplace "physical proof of the unbounded opportunity of American life." Gravesite of President & Mrs. Hoover Two marble ledger stones each mark a grave in a semicircular landscaped plot with a flagpole. Two simple marble slabs mark the graves of Herbert and Lou Henry Hoover. Herbert Hoover Presidential Library & Museum A sprawling one story public building of rough-faced yellowish stone has a white portico entrance. Exhibit galleries and archival collections tell of the triumphs and tragedies of Hoover’s long career in public service. Blacksmith Shop A low brown barn-like building with three large doorways has a large horseshoe on its facade. Herbert Hoover's father Jesse owned a blacksmith shop similar to the one at Herbert Hoover NHS. Schoolhouse A one-story wooden building painted off-white has two windows and a central doorway. Many rural Midwestern towns like West Branch placed a high value on education. Friends Meetinghouse Two doorways, one on either side, of a broad white wood frame building divides the sexes. The plainly appointed Friends Meetinghouse and the practices within express Quaker values of peace, simplicity, integrity, and service to others. Statue of Isis A cast bronze figure of a veiled goddess sits on a throne mounted on a concrete pedestal. The people of Belgium gave Herbert Hoover the statue "Isis, Goddess of Life" in gratitude for his famine relief efforts on their behalf during the First World War. Restoration of the Birthplace Cottage In the years following his presidency, Herbert and Lou Hoover restored the president's humble birthplace, which he called, "physical proof of the unbounded opportunity of American life." The small space and few material possessions reflect the Hoovers' ethic of thrift, while the antique furnishings represent common household items of a simply furnished two room rural home. Workers pose by a small house under restoration in a 1930s photo. Simple Beginnings Herbert Hoover's long and accomplished life began in 1874 in a two-room cottage in the center of West Branch, Iowa. His ancestors arrived in horse-drawn wagons hoping to find a new life for their families as they settled in this developing, primarily Quaker, midwestern rural community. A baby in 1800s clothes sits for a portrait photo. Triumphs & Tragedies Herbert Hoover grew up in a supportive family and as a member of a close-knit Quaker community. His childhood experiences in West Branch included the deaths of both parents. Young Herbert relied on values like hard work and faith to overcome being an orphan. An eight year old boy poses for a portrait in 1881 with his younger sister and older brother. Blacksmithing At Herbert Hoover National Historic Site The blacksmith shop at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site is a working smithy. The blacksmiths are trained in the same style as Herbert’s father, Jesse Hoover. It is a style known as traditional blacksmithing, where the techniques, tools, and fuel sources are what have been used for centuries. The blacksmiths demonstrate the skill and hard work needed to turn ordinary iron into useful things. A man with tongs holds metal in a brick forge with bright orange flames. Water Quality & Hydrology Of Hoover Creek Continued development of the Hoover Creek watershed affects both drainage and water quality. The National Park Service monitors water quality and flooding and their effects on the park's environment. Waters from a flooding creek swamp trees and approach a museum. Hoover Creek Watershed Planning Scientific studies of Hoover Creek's hydrology and water quality suggest solutions for restoring its health. A map of a creek shows flooding frequencies with differently colored lines. Reflections of a Neophyte Prairie Topophiliac Writer Gaynell Gavin was artist-in-residence at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in 2011. During her residency she wrote the nonfiction essay "Reflections of a Neophyte Prairie Topophiliac". Tall yellow daisy-like flowers bloom in a golden and green grassland. West Branch's Quaker Heritage The restored Friends Meetinghouse, where young Herbert Hoover and his family worshipped, represents the values of the community that shaped Hoover’s early years in West Branch. Squares of light fall from a window onto wooden pews. Citizen Science At Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Citizen scientists— volunteers of varying expertise who help research natural resources— contribute to the body of scientific knowledge collected from Herbert Hoover National Historic Site. A woman and man examine inspect specimens with optical aids in a tallgrass prairie. West Branch Grows, 1851-1874 You might be surprised to learn that Herbert Hoover didn’t live in one of the larger, fancier-looking homes at the historic site, even though they were built during the same time period. By comparison, his single story birthplace cottage measured only 14 feet by 20 feet in size. Although you can go inside the house where America’s 31st President was born, the homes on Downey and Poplar streets are not open to the public and are used as offices or residences. A picket fence encloses a white two-story house with a porch. 11 Ways National Parks Influenced World War I (and vice versa) Uncover the hidden history of World War I in the national parks! A Renault tank and infantry move through a field Wildland Fire in Tallgrass Prairie: Midwestern United States Prairies depend on fire to maintain the ecosystem stability and diversity. One benefit of fire in this community is the elimination of invasive plants, thereby helping to shape and maintain the prairie. Bison grazing in recently burned area. Summer Yardscape Writer M.S. Coe was artist-in-residence at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in 2011. During her residency she wrote the fiction story "Summer Yardscape". A boy walks a park path toward a historic blacksmith shop painted brown. The Son of West Branch, America’s Great Humanitarian Radio dramatist William Anderson was artist-in-residence at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in 2008. During his residency Dr. Anderson wrote the radio drama script "The Son of West Branch, America's Great Humanitarian". His production of that script won an Award of Excellence from the Broadcast Education Association in 2012. A 1919 photo depicts a man in a hat and coat touring a European city street. Historical Studies, Reports, & Plans The National Park Service publishes studies, reports, and plans for parks' historic structures, furnishings, and landscapes. A 1970s photo shows park visitors following a female ranger in a tan uniform. Our Artists-in-Residence Numerous artists have worked in residence at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site since 1999. A man seated at an easel paints and displays finished paintings. Management Plans Plans and documents, along with historical and scientific research, guide the management of Herbert Hoover National Historic Site. A stone and wood sign marks the entrance to Herbert Hoover park and museum. Bird Checklist For Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Birds perch, flutter, nest, hunt, and soar at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site. Their colors and songs add visible and audible vitality to the park’s dignified commemorative setting. This bird checklist, based on data from scientific surveys, is your own tool for measuring the vital signs of the park’s natural areas. Two hummingbirds perch on their nest in the greenery of a tree. Wildflower List & Bloom Times For Herbert Hoover National Historic Site A colorful pallette of flowers mixes with the green, purple, and golden hues of native grasses from April until late October. Bright purple petals wreath a spike-shaped flower heads. The Emergence of the Great Humanitarian Herbert Hoover grew up in a Quaker family and community that valued peace, simplicity, integrity, and service to others. That Herbert Hoover took these beliefs to heart became evident when he emerged from the ghastly carnage of the First World War an American and international hero. A man in a suit and hat poses with three relief workers and sacks of flour. Family & Fellowship Herbert Hoover's parents and their fellow Quakers played a large role forming his values. During these early childhood years, Herbert saw how the Quaker faith promoted simplicity, integrity, equality, peace, and service to others. The hard work and conscientious deeds of his parents and their neighbors helped build a community (of Quakers and others) that also supported the Hoover family. An extended multigenerational family poses during a picnic in 1878. Adversity Leads to Opportunity From the ups and downs of his childhood Herbert Hoover grew to be a resilient and self-reliant man. As his personal achievements mounted, he came to believe that uncommon character opened doors of opportunities, and that individuals acting conscientiously and cooperatively could together solve great problems. Dignitaries in formal suits listen to an inaugural speech. A Memorial & a Legacy Following his presidency, Herbert Hoover's family wanted to create a place where the values he believed in could be shared with all Americans. The park reflects the Hoovers’ and their supporters’ vision of how anyone might achieve the American Dream. Mourners look on as American servicemen fold a flag over a coffin. Herbert Hoover Family & Genealogy Find a brief genealogy of Herbert Hoover's family, starting with his parents. In a 1908 studio portrait photo a young mother poses with her two small boys. Aquatic Invertebrate Community Monitoring at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Scientists use established methods to monitor aquatic invertebrates and water quality. Monitoring invertebrates tells us how streams change over time. We find out what species are there and their tolerance level to pollution and disturbances. This helps us estimate water quality conditions in the river. Hoover Creek at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Maternal Lineage Poet Laura Madeline Wiseman was artist-in-residence at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in 2009. During her residency she wrote and recorded the poem "Maternal Lineage". An open partition separates wooden benches in a plainly furnished house of worship. Acoustic Monitoring At Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Studies of sound at Herbert Hoover NHS helps identify sources of noise and inform future management decisions. A portable weather station and sound monitoring instrument set up in a field. The Arts At Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Ever since the installation of the Statue of Isis across from Herbert Hoover's restored birthplace in 1939, the historic site has been home to original artwork that commemorates the 31st President of the United States. A portrait painting shows a middle aged man in a suit sitting in a dark room. Aquatic Invertebrate Monitoring at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site The National Park Service monitors aquatic invertebrate species in Hoover Creek to evaluate the stream's water quality and ecological integrity. Three scientist wade in a shallow creek with equipment for collecting aquatic invertebrates. Herbert Hoover Historic Places Numerous historic sites, museums, and homes in the United States and abroad commemorate the life of President Herbert Hoover. The portico of a museum is painted white with a carved wooden presidential seal. About Artist Residencies & How To Apply Herbert Hoover National Historic Site offers a residency of eight weeks during the months of June, July and August. Professional American visual and performing artists, writers, composers, and other artists may apply. A woman in a uniform shirt and hat photographing yellow flowers in the prairie. In The Tallgrass "In The Tallgrass" is an animated short film produced by Erin Anfinson, 2017 artist-in-residence at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site. A still from a cut paper animation shows an orange butterfly among purple flowers and green grass. Herbert Hoover's National Parks Herbert Hoover is not thought of as one of our better presidents, but he made lasting contributions in the national parks he established. During Herbert Hoover's presidency from 1929 to 1933, the land designated for new national parks and monuments increased by 40 percent. Sepia photo of Herbert Hoover standing at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Women in Fire Science: Sherry Leis Sherry Leis, a plant and fire ecologist, shares her story about being a scientist and her love of prairie ecosystems. A woman takes notes while standing near the edge of a fire at night. Monitoring Invasive Plants at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Park scientists monitor nonnative plants that threaten the native plant communities of the tallgrass prairie. Two men walk through a grassland with a spray tank and other equipment. Fire Ecology Monitoring at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Scientists compare prescribed fire treatment with changes in plant community richness and diversity. A firefighter ignites the dry grasses as part of a prescribed fire in the spring. Fish Communities at Herbert Hoover National Historical Site Fishes occur in Hoover Creek when the flow is stable. Visitors commonly see minnows like creek chub. Changes in water quality often affect fish species. Many species are intolerant of poor water quality so monitoring fish communities is a useful way to asses environmental conditions within a stream. A foot-long fish with reddish fins spotted in a shallow creek from above. Bird Community Monitoring at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Monitoring breeding bird populations helps scientists and park managers evaluate the health of the prairie ecosystem at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site. A black bird with red and yellow on its wings flies across and brown and green field. Bird Community Monitoring at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, Iowa Beyond the pleasure that birds provide, they are a significant component of park ecosystems. The Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors change in bird community composition and bird abundance to determine the health of bird communities. They accomplish this by surveying seasonal and year round resident birds in the park during the breeding season. Red-winged blackbird in flight Prairie Monitoring At Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Scientists monitor plant communities to measure changes in the tallgrass prairie at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site. The studies help park managers to adapt their land management practices. A scientist in straw hat examines plant species inside a circular plot. On Presidential Births and Deaths There are many connections between the Presidents. This article will explore some of those connections. the United States Presidential Seal Vegetation Community Monitoring at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site The purpose of the restored prairie at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site is to provide a sense of the landscape that was present at the time of Herbert Hoover’s life as a contemplative backdrop for visitors to learn about his life. Prairie at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Writings By Artists-in-residence At Herbert Hoover National Historic Site Poets, playwrights, fiction writers, and essayists participate in the Artist-in-Residence Program at Herbert Hoover National Historic Site. A large black and yellow moth hovers at a pale purple flower. Series: Herbert Hoover, West Branch's Native Son What do you want to be when you grow up? Most of us have been asked this question, and many of us are still looking for the answer— life is a continuous journey, and few of us know just where we may end up. Herbert Hoover could not have know that he would become the 31st President of the United States. He did believe in the "American dream"— that if you work hard, have faith in yourself, and treat others fairly and charitably, then you can accomplish anything. A middle aged man in 1920s dress holds up a German shepherd by its paws. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Herbert Hoover National Historic Site, Iowa Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] hoover birthplace cottage Charles Curtis: The First American Indian to be Vice President of the United States When Charles Curtis was born in 1860, no one could have known that he was destined for a career in national politics. Nor that he would become the first with American Indian ancestry to hold the second highest office in the nation. Curtis was 1/8th American Indian and a descendent of Kaw Chief White Plume and Osage Chief Pawhuska. As a child, for a short time, he lived on the Kaw Indian Reservation near Council Grove, Kansas, an important stop on the Santa Fe Trail. A historic portrait of a man in a suit. Herbert Hoover, 31st President of the United States Herbert Hoover, mining engineer, humanitarian, statesman, and 31st President of the United States, was born August 10, 1874 in a simple two-room cottage in West Branch, Iowa. His Quaker family had helped settle the town, and their principles of honesty, hard work, simplicity, and generosity guided Hoover throughout his life of service to the nation and the world. A middle aged man in a suit, tie, and high-collar shirt sits for a portrait photo.

also available

National Parks
USFS NW