"6-Pounder Cannon Firing" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Horseshoe Bend

National Military Park - Alabama

Horseshoe Bend National Military Park is the site of the last battle of the Creek War on March 27, 1814. General Andrew Jackson's Tennessee militia, aided by the 39th U.S. Infantry Regiment and Cherokee and Lower Creek allies, finally crushed Upper Creek Red Stick resistance during the Battle of Horseshoe Bend at this site on the Tallapoosa River. Jackson's decisive victory at Horseshoe Bend broke the power of the Creek Nation. Over 800 Upper Creeks died defending their homeland. This was the largest loss of life for Native Americans in a single battle in the history of United States. On August 9, 1814, the Creeks signed the Treaty of Fort Jackson, which ceded 23 million acres (93,000 km2) of land in Alabama and Georgia to the United States government.

maps

Official visitor map of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park (NMP) in Alabama. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Horseshoe Bend - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Horseshoe Bend National Military Park (NMP) in Alabama. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/hobe/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horseshoe_Bend_National_Military_Park Horseshoe Bend National Military Park is the site of the last battle of the Creek War on March 27, 1814. General Andrew Jackson's Tennessee militia, aided by the 39th U.S. Infantry Regiment and Cherokee and Lower Creek allies, finally crushed Upper Creek Red Stick resistance during the Battle of Horseshoe Bend at this site on the Tallapoosa River. Jackson's decisive victory at Horseshoe Bend broke the power of the Creek Nation. Over 800 Upper Creeks died defending their homeland. This was the largest loss of life for Native Americans in a single battle in the history of United States. On August 9, 1814, the Creeks signed the Treaty of Fort Jackson, which ceded 23 million acres (93,000 km2) of land in Alabama and Georgia to the United States government. On 27 March 1814, Major General Andrew Jackson ‘s army of 3,300 men attacked Chief Menawa’s 1,000 Red Stick Creek warriors fortified in a horseshoe shaped bend of the Tallapoosa River. Over 800 Red Sticks died that day. The battle ended the Creek War, resulted in a land cession of 23,000,000 acres to the United States and created a national hero of Andrew Jackson. Located in northeastern Tallapoosa County, Horseshoe Bend National Military Park is accessible from US Highway 280, as well as AL Highways 22 and 49. The Park is located 5 miles south of the town of Newsite, AL and 12 miles north of the city of Dadeville, AL. Horseshoe Bend National Military Park Visitor Center Visit our newly renovated museum to learn more about the Muscogee (Creek) people who made Alabama their home for thousands of years. See the 23-minute park film to learn about events leading to the Creek War and the consequences still reverberating today. Discover young Andrew Jackson as he builds his reputation as a tough-as-nails fighter. Participate in Junior Ranger activities, get your Passport stamp, or shop in our bookstore for educational items for all ages. Rangers are available to assist you. Horseshoe Bend National Military Park is located along Highway 49 in northeastern Tallapoosa County. From US-280 in Dadeville, travel 12 miles north along US-49. From US-280 in Alexander City, follow US-22 east for 19 miles. Turn right onto Horseshoe Bend Road/Highway 49, and travel 5 miles south to the park entrance. From Newnan, GA, follow GA-34 W and AL-22 W for about 60 miles, then make a left on County Road 79 in Daviston. Follow CR 79 for 8 miles, then left on US-49. Park entrance is 0.2 miles. Camping Horseshoe Bend NMP does not have camping. The closest RV and tent camping is Wind Creek State Park near Dadeville, AL. https://www.alapark.com/parks/wind-creek-state-park Visitor Center blue cannon sits in front of park's visitor center The Horseshoe Bend NMP's Mission 66 Visitor Center with 1812 era 3-pounder cannon. Cannon on Gun Hill A blue painted 6-pounder cannon sits on hill facing the battlefield On Gun Hill, the historic cannon sits approximately where Gen. Andrew Jackson's artillery pieces fired upon the stout log barricade erected by Red Stick Creeks during the Battle of the Horseshoe. Nature Trail Sunlight shining through the tree canopy along the nature trail Visitors can find solitude, seasonal beauty, and abundant wildlife along the 2.8 mile trail through the park. Horseshoe Bend Aerial view of the horseshoe-shaped bend of the Tallapoosa River Aerial view of what Creek Indians called the "horses flat foot" shows the bend in the river that is the park's namesake. Tallapoosa River and Miller Bridge Piers flat river, green trees lining banks, old bridge pier made of stones in river on left side of photo Tallapoosa River and remnants of the Miller Bridge piers Ranger Programs Two rangers dressed in 1812 clothing face a line of children with wooden muskets Visitors have enjoyed Ranger-led programs at Horseshoe Bend for generations Picnic Area picnic tables, pavilion, and wayside exhibit in main picnic area Picnic tables and pavilions are available free on a first come-first served basis, or may be reserved for a fee. Losing ground: The wages of war in Indian Country Although the conclusion of the War of 1812 brought little change in the life of most American citizens, for American Indians it was disastrous. The loss of influential tribal chiefs and millions of acres of territory left tribal communities weakened and at the mercy of American expansionism. Portrait of Creek leader Menawa, with painted face and feathered hat Creek War in the Southeast: A civil war and an enemy occupation Following the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811 and the destruction of Prophet's Town by the Americans, Shawnee chief Tecumseh intensified his cry for a united Indian confederacy. This influence and the divisive line it drew over assimilationism began echoing throughout tribal lands, even as far away as Alabama. This split populations along ideological lines, forcing them to choose allegiances. Painting of the Battle of Tippecanoe Wildland Fire: Horseshoe Bend Conducts Prescribed Burns In March 2013, Horseshoe Bend National Military Park conducted multiple prescribed burns totaling more than 400 acres. The fires helped restore fire-dependent remnant mountain longleaf pine and its accompanying ecosystem. All ecological and fuels objectives were achieved for these prescribed fires. Series: American Indians and the War of 1812 Kathryn Braund of Auburn University examines the American Indian experience in the War of 1812. The Indian war which broke out in the Ohio country in 1811 and the Red Stick or Creek War of 1813 are commonly viewed as part of the War of 1812, but in reality, the Indian wars were concurrent conflicts that had their origins in long-standing grievances over land and the right of Indian peoples to self-determination. American Indians and the War of 1812 Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Horseshoe Bend National Military Park, Alabama Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] park trail

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