"Hopewell Culture National Historical Park" by National Park Service , public domain

Hopewell Culture

National Historical Park - Ohio

Hopewell Culture National Historical Park is composed of six separate sites in Ross County, Ohio, including the former Mound City Group National Monument. The park has earthworks and burial mounds from the Hopewell culture, indigenous peoples who flourished from about 200 BC to AD 500, including archaeological resources of the Hopewell culture.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/hocu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopewell_Culture_National_Historical_Park Hopewell Culture National Historical Park is composed of six separate sites in Ross County, Ohio, including the former Mound City Group National Monument. The park has earthworks and burial mounds from the Hopewell culture, indigenous peoples who flourished from about 200 BC to AD 500, including archaeological resources of the Hopewell culture. Nearly 2000 years ago, American Indians built dozens of monumental mounds and earthen enclosures in southern Ohio. These earthwork complexes were ceremonial landscapes used for feasts, funerals, rituals, and rites of passage associated with an American Indian religious movement that swept over half the continent for almost 400 years. Come walk among the earthworks and experience the past. Take U.S. 23. Exit U.S. 23 at State Route 207 and turn right. Continue on S.R. 207 for 2 miles until it merges with S.R. 104 (Make no turns, continue straight on road as it turns into S.R. 104). Follow S.R. 104, turn left into park (approximately 1.8 miles past the S.R. 104 & S.R. 207 intersection), follow entrance road to visitor center. Mound City Group Visitor Center The only visitor center among all open sites of Hopewell Culture National Historical Park is at Mound City Group. Except for Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day, the visitor center maintains regular Hours of Operation on a daily basis. Mound City Group visitor center is located on the north side of Chillicothe, on State Route 104, just north of the intersection with U.S. 35. From U.S. 23, exit at State Route 207 and turn west. Continue on S.R. 207 for 2 miles until it merges with S.R. 104 (Make no turns, continue straight on road as it turns into S.R. 104). Follow S.R. 104, turn left into park (approximately 1.8 miles past the S.R. 104 & S.R. 207 intersection), follow entrance road to visitor center. No Campgrounds No camping is available within the park. Visit the Chillicothe Visitors Bureau website for nearby campgrounds, http://visitchillicotheohio.com/where-to-stay/campgrounds. Mound City Group sunrise An early morning sun casting long shadows over grass-covered mounds. Dawn at the Mound City Group as the sun casts long shadows over the grass. The Mound City Group visitor center A tan building with a red-peaked roof surrounded by green grass and tan sidewalks The Mound City Group visitor center main entrance with Mound City Group in the background view Hopeton Earthworks A green, grassy field with taller areas of uncut grass in geometric shapes under a partly cloudy sky The overlook area of Hopeton Earthworks allowing visitors to view the interpretive mowing of the geometric shapes Hopewell Mound Group overlook An overlook area showing a green grassy field with a panel showing artwork and text The main overlook area of Hopewell Mound Group showing the enormity of the site. Seip Earthworks A grassy trail running between tall trees in a green field leads to a large grass-covered mound A cut grass trail leading to the large Seip Mound at Seip Earthworks. Museum Mural A large art mural showing Native Americans standing and crouching in front of a pit. A large mural in the park museum showing an artistic rendition of what the Hopewell may have engaged in over 2,000 years ago. The Duck Pot A clay pot with impressions of ducks etched into the sides One of the Duck Pots recovered at Mound City Group during excavations in the early 1900's. Bone Scraper and Awl Tall pieces of bone on display in a museum case A bone scraper and awl on display in the park museum. Ranger Desk A tan-orange curved information desk with a man sitting behind the counter The information desk inside of the Mound City Group visitor center. School field trips at the park Several children walking with a park ranger in a flat hat near grass-covered mounds. A school field trip visiting the Mound City Group as a ranger leads them on a tour. The Mound City Group bookstore Several square pedestals hold books and other gifts in the middle of a carpeted floor The bookstore inside of the Mound City Group visitor center. Yoga at the Mound City Group Several people sitting on blankets in the shade under a tree on the green grass. Visitors performing yoga during a Yoga event at the Mound City Group under the shade of a large tree. Mound City Group river walk An asphalt path with a steel handrail on the left with green vegetative slope to the right. The paved river walk trail at the Mound City Group. Spruce Hill trail A gravel trail with exposed shale on the right side of the trail. The trail to the Spruce Hill plateau showing exposed shale on the right side fo the gravel path. A coyote in the park A gray coyote begins walking in the grass in front of a grass-covered mound A lone coyote stares at the photographer while walking in front of a mound at Mound City Group. Inside The Collections - HOCU 837 To some, a broken piece of pottery would be tossed away without a second thought. However, to archeologists, it's a chapter in a novel that can tell us a more complete story. Learn about an important piece of pottery in the Hopewell Culture NHP collection that is small in size, but massive in its story. A broken piece of pottery with etched markings on the surface of it. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, Ohio Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] grass covered earthwork mounds NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments Between the Monuments In 2015, the park engaged in an international partnership to complete a high-resolution magnetic survey at Hopewell Mound Group in Ross County, Ohio. Together, this new partnership also tested the development of a new array to collect and analyze data. An ATV attached to a wide trailer affixed with several geosensing instruments Before Camp Sherman Before the U.S. Army built one of the largest military cantonments for WWI training purposes, the lands which would become part of Camp Sherman were already laden with history. The lands were used as Army training camps in the previous century, but more importantly, the lands were home to a prehistoric culture of American Indians that left thrived and flourished in the south-central Ohio valley over 2,000 years before Camp Sherman was even thought about. A landscape view of farmland with several trees in the foreground 11 Ways National Parks Influenced World War I (and vice versa) Uncover the hidden history of World War I in the national parks! A Renault tank and infantry move through a field The Schuylkill River Sojourn: Fostering Environmental Stewardship and Community Kayaks gathered at a stop on the Schuylkill River Sojourn / Image courtesy of Schuylkill River National Heritage Area Kayaks gathered at a stop on the Schuylkill River Sojourn Amphibious Park Life While Hopewell Culture National Historical Park is known for its incredible collection of prehistoric earthworks and artwork created by the Hopewell culture, the park is also home to a wide array of flora and fauna. Read more about some of the smallest inhabitants of this national park site. A small pool of water near a gravel trail and surrounded by several trees. Camp Sherman, Ohio's WWI Soldier Factory Built in only a few months, immediately after America's entry into World War I, this military cantonment in Chillicothe, Ohio quickly became one of the largest constructed for the war effort. Although its gates were only open for three years, Camp Sherman trained hundreds of thousands of soldiers and would send one army division to Europe before the end of the war. Many large, two-story buildings in close proximity The Influenza Pandemic of 1918 at Camp Sherman Fighting the enemy in combat on the battlefields of France was a horror in and of itself, but in the fall of 1918, soldiers on the battlefield and every other person on the planet would be facing off against an invisible killer that would devastate the world population. The Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918 tallied a staggering amount of victims and remains the most deadly viral outbreak in the history of the planet. Soldiers in the backs of large trucks Camp Sherman Recreation Training to become a U.S. Soldier was (and still is) a rigorous task that often lasted all day. It was challenging to all involved, both physically and mentally. While training was the key purpose of the thousands of soldiers being at Camp Sherman, they did have some downtime from all of the rigors of becoming a soldier. Recreation at the camp played an important part in maintaining physical and mental well-being. Football players posing for a portrait on the steps to a building The Birth of Camp Sherman A sleepy midwestern town in the middle of south-central Ohio is transformed almost overnight into one of thirty-two military training camps. Read about how thousands of acres of prime farmland evolved into modern-day buildings and Army facilities to help train the hundreds of thousands of men who would venture overseas to fight for democracy in Europe. Several buildings under construction beyond a tree line Hidden Hopewell Landscapes Project 2015 In 2015, ambitious park staff embarked on an exciting field season at Hopewell Mound Group. With assistance from Dr. Timothy Schililng of the Midwest Archeological Center, several teachers enrolled in the park's Teacher Workshop, and international archeologists, the project yielded interesting and important information about the Hopewell culture at this particular site. A black and white map rendering of Hopewell Mound Group Archeology at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park Although the Hopewell mounds and earthworks of Ross County, Ohio are well known, many basic questions remain about the archeological sites and the American Indian people who built them. archaeologist excavating Honeysuckle Removal at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park What can you do to join the fight against honeysuckle? Learning to identify and remove, Amur and Japanese honeysuckle in your own back yard can go a long way to helping prevent them from spreading to new areas. yellow and black butterfly rests on green leaves. Inside the Collections - HOCU 2691 Join Dr. Andrew Weiland as he delves into the intricacies of HOCU 2691. A wonderfully preserved copper artifact from the Hopewell culture that was created 2,000 years ago. Listen to his overview of the piece in an introductory video and then read a detailed analysis of this awesome artifact. A green and brown rectangular shape of oxidized copper with a measuring stick below it Travel or Trade? The Hopewell were known for many remarkable accomplishments. One of those accomplishments was that they created incredible artwork out of exotic materials sourced from all over the North American continent. How did all of these materials get to South-Central Ohio though? Did the Hopewell travel or did they trade, or both? Explore this activity and find out the amazing answer. Outline of the United States with several artifacts placed on the edges of the map. Earthworks Sizes and Shapes The Hopewell were known for their accomplishments as travelers and traders, among other things. They were also known for their ability to build enormous earthworks constructed out of earthen materials like dirt and clay that would encompass huge amounts of land, often several hundred acres! In this activity, you'll discover the geometric shapes these earthworks resembled. Several drawings of earthworks using vairous geometric shapes Hopewell Earthworks Hopewell Culture National Historical Park protects six of the many Hopewell earthworks in the South Central Ohio area. These giant geometric earthworks were all built about 2,000 years ago! Many were enormous in size and one could hold around 100 American football fields! Unscramble word jumbles to reveal six earthwork's names for this activity. A trace outline of an earthworks complex resembling a rectangle and a square Veteran Story: John Pflaumer John Pflaumer is the Education and Outreach Coordinator at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. Ranger holding child scissors At the 11th Hour... By the end of 1918, the war was winding down as Allied forces close in on the Axis powers in Europe. At the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month, both sides met in a rail car at Le Francport near Compiègne and the fighting that had raged on for years and claimed millions of lives was all but over after the signatures were applied to the Armistice. Nine men standing at the end of a train car Inside the Collections - HOCU 3561 Park Archeological Technician, Laura Crawford, discusses artifact HOCU 3561, an eyebrow-raising artifact that was discovered during excavations in the 1920's at Mound City Group. Learn about this non-Hopewell artifact and how it became part of the park's collections. Group of burial mounds to the top left and an image of four harpoons of various sizes to the right Inside the Collections - HOCU 4048 How much can we learn from tiny, woven plant fibers? Learn about HOCU 4048, a wonderfully preserved ancient textile. A metric ruler shows the size of a small clump of prehistoric fiber. Inside the Collections - HOCU 6162 There's more to our collection than cultural artifacts! Hopewell Culture National Historical Park's collection also include natural resource specimens. HOCU 6162 is an excellent example of the botanical specimens in our collection. tulip shaped leaf on white paper. Inside the Collections - HOCU 2693 What makes copper so special? Learn about HOCU 2693, a copper cutout breastplate and explore the importance of copper as a material for the American Indians of the Hopewell Culture. What made this metal so popular in Hopewell Culture? rectangle shaped artifact on black background. Emerald Ash Borer at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park Hopewell Culture NHP's natural resource team does their part to protect ash trees. Our park biologists need your help to stop the spread of this deadly invasive insect. Together, we can be partners in protecting our ash trees from this ruthless invader! s-shaped channels on tree trunk. Volunteer Bird Monitoring at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park Heartland Network staff and volunteers monitor birds within the park during the Spring-breeding season. Volunteers are key to the success of this monitoring effort as they are able to survey birds in years when the Heartland Network is not scheduled to do so. This allows Heartland staff to establish continuous records on bird population trends for the park. Northern Cardinal Bird Community Monitoring at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park Birds are an important part of the world we live in. A significant number of bird species that breed at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park are in decline in the regions around the park. The Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network measures changes in birds and their habitats to determine the health of bird communities and park ecosystems. This information can help managers take effective steps to protect park habitat. A small blue bird with black stripes on its wing and tail crouched on the ground. Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits National Park Getaway: Hopewell Culture National Historical Park Are you ready to step back in time over 2,000 years ago to experience a prehistoric culture that created enormous earthen monuments and crafted intricate artwork out of exotic natural materials that paid homage to their own? Look no farther than the heartland of the United States; Ohio. Hopewell Culture National Historical Park protects the remains of a dynamic social and ceremonial phenomenon that once flourished in the woodlands of eastern North America. Ranger leading a school tour through large prehistoric earthen mounds Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Inside the Collections - HOCU 2683 Delicate copper, wrapped over a carved, wooden effigy is just one characteristic of this unique artifact. Join American Conservation Experience (ACE) Intern Rachel Whyte as she discusses HOCU-2683, also known as "The Mushroom Wand." copper wand in the shape of a mushroom Problematic Plant Monitoring at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park We survey for problematic plants at Hopewell Culture National Historical Park to decide which management actions are best and to track the success of our control efforts. Problematic plants include nonnative plants, invasive plants, and what we sometimes refer to as weeds. These plants can cause harm to ecosystems and even to people. We have identified 51 problematic plants at the park since 2008. A shrub-like autumn olive tree with gray green leaves Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting Hopewell Culture NHP Are you ready to visit Hopewell Culture National Historical Park? Well, round out your preparation by going over this Top 10 list of ranger tips compiled by park ranger! A tan colored building with a red roof in front of grass-covered mounds in the background. Hopeton Earthworks to be Nominated to the World Heritage List This article introduces Hopeton Earthworks, on of the eight ancient American Indian earthwork complexes being nominated to the World Heritage List as “Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks.” Historic black and white survey map of earthwork and surrounding terrain. Ohio's National Park Sites in Ross County Contribute to World Heritage The ongoing effort to nominate “Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks” to the World Heritage List includes eight ancient American Indian earthwork complexes: the Octagon Earthworks and Great Circle in Licking County; the Fort Ancient Earthworks in Warren County; and five earthworks included in Hopewell Culture National Historical Park in Ross County, Ohio. Map of earthworks with terrain and multiple text features. High Bank Earthworks to be Nominated to the World Heritage List The High Bank site is one of five earthwork complexes included in Hopewell Culture National Historical Park near Chillicothe, Ohio (not to be confused with the Highbanks Metro Park north of Columbus). These National Park sites are being nominated to the World Heritage List as “Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks” alongside three other earthworks managed by the Ohio History Connection. black and white map of geometric earthwork and surrounding topography. Seip Earthworks to be Nominated to the World Heritage List One of the wonders of the ancient world lies just 12 miles west of Chillicothe, Ohio. Seip Earthworks is one of five monumental American Indian earthwork complexes included in Hopewell Culture National Historical Park. These National Park sites are being nominated to the World Heritage List as “Hopewell Ceremonial Earthworks” alongside three other earthworks managed by the Ohio History Connection. black and white survey map of a geometric earthwork and the surrounding topography. Inside the Collections - HOCU 2832 and 4222 From the mouths of some of the ocean's top predators millions of years ago to the hands of the people of the Scioto River Valley, learn the story of 14 amazingly preserved sharks teeth! collage of two photos containing numerous sharks teeth Ohio's Prehistoric Past Ohio has an incredibly rich history. For more than 14,000 years humans have lived in the region between Lake Erie and the Ohio River, now known as Ohio. Early Native American groups traveled across the landscape and hunted, gathered, and farmed in the area. In this reading you will learn about Prehistoric Ohio, the history of Ohio prior to western expansion of the American colonies in the late 1700’s. ink drawing of bird effigy Copper How did copper artifacts get to Hopewell earthworks in southern Ohio? shiny, brown-colored metal chunk with a pitted surface.

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