Hopewell Furnace

National Historic Site - Pennsylvania

Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Berks County, near Elverson, Pennsylvania, is an example of an American 19th century rural "iron plantation". The buildings include a blast furnace, the ironmaster's house and auxiliary structures including a blacksmith's shop, a company store and several worker's houses. Today, Hopewell Furnace consists of 14 restored structures, 52 features on the List of Classified Structures, and a total of 848 mostly wooded acres.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Recreation Map of French Creek State Park (SP) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.French Creek - Recreation Map

Recreation Map of French Creek State Park (SP) in Pennsylvania. Published by Pennsylvania State Parks.

https://www.nps.gov/hofu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopewell_Furnace_National_Historic_Site Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Berks County, near Elverson, Pennsylvania, is an example of an American 19th century rural "iron plantation". The buildings include a blast furnace, the ironmaster's house and auxiliary structures including a blacksmith's shop, a company store and several worker's houses. Today, Hopewell Furnace consists of 14 restored structures, 52 features on the List of Classified Structures, and a total of 848 mostly wooded acres. Hopewell Furnace showcases an early American landscape of industrial operations from 1771-1883, Hopewell and other "iron plantations" laid the foundation for the transformation of the United States into an industrial giant for the time. The park's 848 acres and historic structures illustrate the business, technology and lifestyle of our growing nation. On PA Route 345, 5 miles South of Birdsboro, Pennsylvania. Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site Virtual Visitor Center Because Visitor Center operations at Hopewell Furnace are closed due to the COVID-19 response, this Virtual Visitor Center page has been designed by park rangers to provide you with the information needed for a successful visit to Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site. Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site Visitor Center - 2 Mark Bird Lane, Elverson, PA 19520 Currently the Visitor Center is Closed due to Covid-19 safety protocol: Please visit our Virtual Visitor Center page for more information during this period. You can still shop for Hopewell Furnace NHS related items by visiting the Eastern National online Bookstore. Items include a variety of souvenirs. Historical Rendering of Hopewell Furnace in Operation, 1840 Artists' Illustaration of Hopewell Furnace in operation circa 1840. Overview of the Hopewell Furnace "iron plantation" community in operation during its prime. Hopewell Furnace's Boarding House Front of Hopewell Furnace's Boarding House Hopewell Furnace's Boarding House housed single men or those living away from their families, who came to work at the furnace. Blacksmith Shop & Cast House Side view of blacksmith shop with cast house behind it. The Cast House was the industrial center of the ironworks. It is were iron ore was smelted into iron metal and products. The smaller blacksmith shop formed iron metal into all kinds of necessary tools and goods used in everyday life. Hopewell Stove Side view of Hopewell Stove in front of wagon running gear. The most notable manufactured product Hopewell Furnace made was its stoves. They were produced by the thousands at Hopewell and other like furnaces in the early 19th century and were transported for sale by horse and wagon. Charcoal Pile Demonstration charcoal pile smoldering. Charcoal was the fuel used to fire Hopewell Furnace and other furnaces of its age. Thousands of bushles of charcoal were made from hardwood trees on the furnace lands and entered into the furnace to keep it "in blast." NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] historic buildings Morale, Welfare and Recreation in WWII National Parks Wartime NPS Director Newton Drury wrote 'In wartime, the best function of these areas is to prove a place to which members of the armed forces and civilians may retire to restore shattered nerves and to recuperate physically and mentally for the war tasks still ahead of them.' During World War II, parks across the United States supported the morale of troops and sought to become places of healing for those returning from war. B&W; soldiers post in front of large tree Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail e-Newsletter Washington-Rochambeau Revolutionary Route National Historic Trail, WARO quarterly e-newsletter 2020 Weather In Review: Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site 2020 was very warm and wet in southeastern Pennsylvania. In all, it was the 3rd warmest and 22nd wettest year since 1895 at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site. Hopewell Furnace Cast House on a sunny day Archeology of African American Landscapes at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site This project began in 2019 and will continue into 2021, and encompasses an archeological and historic investigation into multiple sites at Hopewell Furnace National Historical Site. Our work seeks to identify, document, and analyze artifacts, features, and other archeological evidence that can tell us about the lives of African Americans at Hopewell Furnace in the past. Overview of Excavation at Woodlot site in Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings An introduction to the benthic macroinvertebrate community at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site Benthic macroinvertebrates are an important park of stream ecosystems in Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site. NPS scientists are studying these organisms in order to better understand and protect park natural resources. NPS writing on a clipboard next to a stream.

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