"Quapaw Bathhouse with tulips" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Hot Springs

National Park - Arkansas

Hot Springs National Park is a United States National Park in central Garland County, Arkansas, adjacent to the city of Hot Springs, the county seat.

maps

Official visitor map of Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Hot Springs - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/hosp/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_Springs_National_Park Hot Springs National Park is a United States National Park in central Garland County, Arkansas, adjacent to the city of Hot Springs, the county seat. Hot Springs National Park has a rich cultural past. The grand architecture of our historic bathhouses is equally matched by the natural curiosities that have been drawing people here for hundreds of years. Ancient thermal springs, mountain views, incredible geology, forested hikes, and abundant creeks – all in the middle of town – make Hot Springs National Park a unique and beautiful destination. From Little Rock: Take I-30W towards Texarkana. Exit 111 for US 70W/Hot Springs. Turn Right onto Spring St. Turn Right onto Central Ave. Drive North, the Park will be on the right after Reserve St. From Texarkana: Take 1-30E. Exit 78 for AR-7 and turn left under the highway. Follow AR-7 North for 31 miles. AR-7 becomes Central Ave., the Park will be on the right after Reserve Street. Fordyce Bathhouse Visitor Center and Museum The Fordyce Bathhouse Visitor Center and Museum is open daily. Building capacity is 100 visitors at a time and face masks are required while inside all federal buildings. Park rangers are available on the porch from 9 am - 5 pm to assist with any questions and offer information. The visitor center is located on Central Avenue, downtown Hot Springs Arkansas. Located off Central Avenue and right across from all of the shops downtown, the Visitor Center is on Bathhouse Row. The Fordyce Bathhouse sits between the Maurice Bathhouse and the Quapaw Bathhouse, right next to the stone pillars which mark our grand entrance. Gulpha Gorge Campground Camping at Gulpha Gorge Campground costs $30 per night for all sites. All sites have full hookups: 30 and 50 amp electric, water and sewer connections. Sites are not pull-through. Each campsite has a picnic table, pedestal grill, and water. Camping in Gulpha Gorge Campground is limited to a total of 14 consecutive days and a cumulative total of 30 days in any calendar year. Each 14 day consecutive stay must be followed by a minimum of a 7 day break. All Camp Sites 30.00 Camping is $30 per night.* As of September 17, 2019 camping fees can only be paid by credit or debit cards. No Cash or check payments are accepted.  *Owners of the America the Beautiful: The National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Senior or Access Pass may receive a 50% discount. This discount only applies to the fee for the campsite physically occupied by the pass owner. Relax by the Creek Lawn chairs posted beside a calming creek Many campsites are located along Gulpha Creek Gulpha Creek Fall Colors Fall trees showing color Gulpha Creek during the start of fall Gulpha Creek Two people stand on the banks of Gulpha Creek. An arched bridge is reflected in the water. Gulpha Creek runs right by the campground and is a perfect place to relax. Amphitheater An amphitheater with rows of seating on a lawn within the trees The amphitheater is a great place to host events and bring campers together Creek Crossing A stone walkway bridging the gab across a creek Stones built to bridge the gab across the creek Gulpha Creek Amber brown water flowing between a forest of fall trees Gulpha Creek RV Camping A silver RV camper parked on a lot and hooked up to power All sites come with full RV hookups for electric and water. Tent Camping Several colorful tents are set up underneath the canopy of the trees at the campground. There are opportunities for tent camping at Gulpha Gorge. Pay Station The tan brick, ranch style building houses the campground's fee station and community bulletin board The fee station for campground reservations is located within this building. Campers RV's lined up on the campground Park your RV next to the river Bathhouse Row Evening A pink sky above gentle white buildings Bathhouse Row as the sun sets Hot Water Cascade Misty water evaporating from a cascade The Arlington Lawn holds a beautiful thermal cascade Bathhouse Row From The Waters A sky view of large bathhouse buildings The Waters offers a great view of bathhouse row Bathhouse Row Stone entrance pillars in front of a row of four bathouses Visitors and patients come to take the thermal waters Take A Hike! Close up of a hiking boot on the trail a hiker in the distance Hot Springs National Park has 26 miles of hiking trails to explore. Hiker at bridge Whittington Park Creek Hiker sits at the edge of the creek, with a bridge in the background Visitors hike and enjoy the cool shady places in the park. Bridge with fall colors Stone bridge surrounded by brilliant yellow and green leaves The park is beautiful year round Thermal Water Trough A stone tough in a green forest with water flowing down Along the hiking trails of Hot Springs Mountain are active troughs for directing the thermal water Visitor at the edge of the pools of the hot water cascade women sitting on the stone wall at the hot water cascade as the vapor rises The natural curiosity of the thermal water can be seen and experienced Balanced Rock Overlook Sun setting over rolling hills Along Sunset Trail is the spectacular view over Balanced Rock Mountain Tower and Pagoda A tower and pagoda on the side of a mountain For the best views of the Ouachita mountains, the tower and pagoda offer amazing and different sights Wildland Fire in Arkansas' National Parks Wildland fire impacts each of the national parks in Arkansas in one way or another. The National Park Service manages wildland fire to protect the public; park communities and infrastructure; conserve natural and cultural resources; and maintain and restore natural ecosystem processes. A prescribed fire is monitored by a firefighter on an all-terrain vehicle. 2016 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Learn the invaluable contributions of the 2016 Hartzog winners, celebrating excellence in volunteerism. Group of school kids pointing at things in a marsh area Revelation in the Woods: Undocumented Cemeteries in Hot Springs National Park In 2009, Midwest Archeological Center archeologists inventoried two abandoned cemeteries in the wooded backcountry of Hot Springs NP. The smaller cemetery contains 27 internments marked by field stones and depressions. Genealogical research suggests that this was an African American cemetery. Comparison of data for it and the larger Euroamerican cemetery show significant physical and cultural differences. Headstone in the forest. Morale, Welfare and Recreation in WWII National Parks Wartime NPS Director Newton Drury wrote 'In wartime, the best function of these areas is to prove a place to which members of the armed forces and civilians may retire to restore shattered nerves and to recuperate physically and mentally for the war tasks still ahead of them.' During World War II, parks across the United States supported the morale of troops and sought to become places of healing for those returning from war. B&W; soldiers post in front of large tree Bat Projects in Parks: Hot Springs National Park Find out what species of bat they discovered during research in Hot Springs National Park! A little bat roosting with white fuzz on its muzzle. Bathhouse Row Cultural Landscape Bathhouse Row, a cultural landscape in Hot Springs National Park, is the largest remaining collection of early twentieth-century bathhouses in the United States. It stands as a reminder of the development and decline of the nation's spa movement, during which bathing was valued as an elegant leisure activity and an option for healing. The landscape is significant for associations with architecture, landscape design, recreation, health, social history, and conservation. Two people cross a street near a tall column, with the Grand Promenade in the background. Wildland Fire in Oak Woodlands and Savannas of the Midwestern United States Oak woodlands depend on disturbances like fire to survive. Frequent fire created and maintained the open structure and make-up of the woodlands. Today, there are fewer oak woodlands across the central United States. Oak woodlands are converting into forests due to a lack of fire. Oak trees with an understory of grasses and forbs. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. hot spring with pathway and visitors Geoscientists-in-the-Parks: Invasive Species Management Read about the work Emily Roberts and G. William Harrison did as Invasive Species Management Interns in Hot Springs National Park as GIPs in 2016. Emily Roberts inventorying a vegetation plot Vegetation Community Monitoring at Hot Springs National Park The mountain area of Hot Springs National Park is in the recharge zone for the hot springs and the forest provides other important ecosystem services. View of mountain ridges at Hot Springs National Park. Aquatic Invertebrate Monitoring at Hot Springs National Park In 2015, scientists found many species that are intolerant to poor water quality, which shows these streams currently are in good condition. Gulpha Creek at Hot Springs National Park. Series: GIP Participants and Project Highlights [8 Articles] Participants selected for the GIP program have a unique opportunity to contribute to the conservation of America's national parks. Participants may assist with research, mapping, GIS analysis, resource monitoring, hazard mitigation, and education. GIP positions can last from 3 months to one-year. Robyn Henderek Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Southern Magnolia at Hot Springs National Park Bathhouse Row along Central Avenue in Hot Springs, Arkansas was historically designed as an "architectural park" where buildings and landscape would unite into one cohesive space. The Magnolia Promenade along Bathhouse Row is a prominent feature of the park’s documented cultural landscape and is listed in the 1985 National Historic Landmark Nomination . Long, waxy leaves of a magnolia, framing a oval seed pod Civil War Connections at Hot Springs National Park Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas has a diverse history. In this article learn about the Civil War and how men who fought during that war came to recover from injuries at this site. a yellow building in the background with a brown sign that says Hot Springs National Park African Americans and the Hot Springs Baths Before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 African American men and women were not allowed to use the same bathhouses as whites. This article will explore the building of their own bathhouses in Hot Springs, Arkansas. Pythian Bathhouse color photo Plan Like A Ranger: Top 10 Things to Know to Plan Your Trip Interested in visiting the thermal springs? Taking a tour of a historic bathhouse? Or hitting the trail? This top ten list of things to know before you visit will ensure you make the most of you time in Hot Springs National Park! Two large, multi-story rectangular buildings peek over the top of tall magnolia trees.

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