"Waves, Beach, Foredune" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Indiana Dunes

National Park - Indiana

Indiana Dunes National Park is on the southern shore of Lake Michigan in Indiana. It has a string of sandy beaches, and trails through dunes, marshland, and jack pine forests. The Dune Succession Trail at West Beach has views of the Chicago skyline and the lake’s bird-rich wetland. Near the Little Calumet River are the Bailly Homestead, an 1820s fur-trading post, and the restored Chellberg Farm.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Indiana Dunes National Park (NP) in Indiana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Indiana Dunes - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Indiana Dunes National Park (NP) in Indiana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Official Visitor Guide of Indiana Dunes National Park in Indiana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Indiana Dunes - The Singing Sands Guide 2021

Official Visitor Guide of Indiana Dunes National Park in Indiana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/indu https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Dunes_National_Park Indiana Dunes National Park is on the southern shore of Lake Michigan in Indiana. It has a string of sandy beaches, and trails through dunes, marshland, and jack pine forests. The Dune Succession Trail at West Beach has views of the Chicago skyline and the lake’s bird-rich wetland. Near the Little Calumet River are the Bailly Homestead, an 1820s fur-trading post, and the restored Chellberg Farm. Indiana Dunes National Park hugs 15 miles of the southern shore of Lake Michigan and has much to offer. Whether you enjoy scouting for rare species of birds or flying kites on the sandy beach, the national park's 15,000 acres will continually enchant you. Hikers will enjoy 50 miles of trails over rugged dunes, mysterious wetlands, sunny prairies, meandering rivers and peaceful forests. Visitors can access the national park via Interstate 94, the Indiana Toll Road (Interstate 80/90), U.S. Highway 12, U.S. Highway 20, Indiana State Road 49, and various other local roads. The Indiana Dunes Visitor Center is located on Indiana State Road 49, between U.S. Highway 20 and Interstate 94 (1215 North State Road 49, Porter, IN 46304). For a driving map to the Indiana Dunes Visitor Center or other locations, check out our maps page. Indiana Dunes Visitor Center (Dorothy Buell Visitor Center) View lobby displays and pick up brochures about Porter County, Indiana, Dunes State Park, and Indiana Dunes National Park. Enjoy educational displays and watch two short orientation videos. Shop in the Eastern National bookstore. The visitor center is open everyday with the exception of Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. Open hours are 9:00 am to 4:00 pm (Due to COVID) Central Time. The Indiana Dunes Visitor Center is located on Indiana State Road 49, between U.S. Highway 20 and Interstate 94 (1215 North State Road 49, Porter, IN 46304). GPS Coordinates: 41.633349, -87.053762 (Decimal Degrees). Paul H. Douglas Center for Environmental Education The Paul H. Douglas Center for Environmental Education is your gateway to the stunning Paul H. Douglas Trail through Miller Woods. This facility connects you to the natural environment through educational hands-on exhibits, ranger-guided hikes, lectures, animals, crafts, and a Nature Play Zone. Summer hours are 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Central Time (Friday of Memorial Day weekend through Monday of Labor Day weekend). Winter hours are 9:00 am to 4:00 pm Central Time. The Paul H. Douglas Center for Environmental Education is located in the western portion of the national park at 100 North Lake Street, about one mile north of U.S. Highway 12 in the Miller neighborhood of Gary (100 North Lake Street, Gary, IN 46304). GPS Coordinates: 41.606286, -87.267483 (Decimal Degrees). Dunewood Campground Campground consists of two loops containing 66 camp-sites (53 conventional drive-in sites and 13 walk/carry-in sites). Four sites are wheelchair accessible (numbers 15, 30, 41 and 55). Each loop has modern restrooms and hot/cold showers. Some sites have limited recreational vehicle length. Convenience stores and a gas station are located 1/4 mile north of the campground at the intersection of U.S. Highway 12 and Broadway Ave. in the town of Beverly Shores. Campground closed during winter, Nov 2 - Mar 31. Standard Night Fee 25.00 $25.00 per night. Access Pass 12.50 The Access Pass provides a 50% each night. Dunewood Campground The Dunewood campground check-in building surrounded by trees. Exterior of the check-in building at Dunewood Campground. Central Avenue Beach Indiana Dunes National Park Michigan Lake beach with green grassy dunes in the background, under a blue sky. Central Avenue Beach at low water levels, spring 2006. Sunset at Indiana Dunes National Park Sunset on Lake Michigan Sunset at Indiana Dunes National Park Sunset on Lake Michigan Sunset on Lake Michigan Sunset on Lake Michigan Mnoké Prairie in Bloom Prairie in Bloom Mnoké Prairie Porter Beach Access Point Porter Beach Access Point Porter Beach Access Point Central Beach Central Beach Central Beach Sunset at Lake View Sunset at Lake View Sunset at Lake View Peace on Lake Michigan Peace on Lake Michigan Peace on Lake Michigan Emerging Concern Among “Every Day Chemicals” You may have heard the saying “all drains lead to the lake,” but it can be hard to remember that includes what is sent down sinks, toilets, and washing machines. Many things we do in the course of a day can contribute to the contamination of surface waters (lake and streams) in ways we cannot see. Some of these “every day chemicals” are known as contaminants of emerging concern. Person in stream collecting water sample 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Prescribed Fire protects Douglas Center from Wildfire at Indiana Dunes National Park The 16-acre Miller Woods Unit #7 prescribed fire at Indiana Dunes National Park in March 2019, helped firefighters protect the park's education center when a wildfire ignited two weeks later. Smoke and flames on a small forested hill. Great Lakes Mapping Great Lakes Network staff assisted Midwest Region staff in a mapping project that reveals a whole new way of looking at the Great Lakes parks. oblique view of the Gull Island shoal, Apostle Islands NL, Lake Superior Experimental reintroduction of state-endangered beach pea (Lathyrus japonicus) to Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore The author discusses best practices for successful reintroduction of this longlived plant species as revealed by the multiyear experiment. The beach pea flower is compact and erect, its color a showy purple. Park Fire Management Staff Complete Emergency Medical Responder Training and Certification The fire management staff at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore recently completed a national-standard emergency medical responder (EMR) course, and eight firefighters successfully earned both national and State of Indiana EMR certifications. The lakeshore fire management staff saw the NPS EMS program as an opportunity to train to be able to better respond to medical-related incidents on the fireline, for park visitors, and when they are dispatched to other parks and forests. A man in a National Park Service uniform uses a blood pressure cuff on a man Wildland Fire: Joint Annual Refresher Training at Indiana Dunes In March 2013, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore fire management staff and Midewin Interagency Hotshot Crew (IHC) conducted several joint training exercises in preparation for the 2013 fire season. They heard from a fire manager about fire management, leadership, and how to succeed in their career, reviewed a Facilitated Learning Analysis of a tree-felling incident that had recently occurred at Indiana Dunes, and participated in rescue training refreshers. National Park Service Staff Explore Strategies for Success at Leadership Conference With a goal of creating better leaders and promoting gender balance, the 2016 Women and Leadership Conference introduced influential policy and business leaders who shared their insights and offered tools to help participants become leaders in their respective fields. A group of men and women stand in front of a blue curtain and an Andrus Center banner. Letter to the Editor The EPA updated its criteria for assessing water and sediment quality. This enabled a more nuanced analysis of water quality conditions in the Great Lakes. Our analysis suggests that parks would benefit from additional work on water clarity. Nearshore water quality monitoring station near Sand Island, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore Community Protection through Prescribed Fire at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore On April 20, 2014 a wayward spark, possibly from a passing train, started a wildland fire that had the potential to threaten the town of Ogden Dunes, Indiana. As a result of a preventive prescribed fire conducted by the fire management staff of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in fall 2013, the fire did not become large and devastating. Great Lakes Fire Management Zone Fire Departments receive much needed wildland fire supplies and equipment. Three Fire Departments protecting NPS units in the Great Lakes Fire Management Zone received over $95,000 in wildland fire equipment this year through the Rural Fire Readiness Grant. NPS and Burns Harbor Firefighters stand in front of donated fire engine Nearshore conditions in the Great Lakes national parks: A baseline water quality and toxicological assessment Field survey results suggest generally good water quality, although nutrient concentrations were unexpectedly high near several parks, and metals and legacy pollutants continue to affect sediments and fish. Nearshore water quality monitoring station near Sand Island, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore National Parks in the History of Science: Plant Succession In the 1890s the dunes now protected as Indiana Dunes National Park hosted the first research on plant succession. That research helped establish ecology as a science, made succession an enduring concept, and explains why you mow your lawn. historical photo of a group of people sitting on a hill New Wildland Urban Interface Fuel Break Protects Community in Indiana Dunes National Park To reduce the threat of wildfire and ease prescribed fire preparations, the fire staff of the Great Lakes Fire Management Zone, based at Indiana Dunes National Park, constructed a permanent fuel break along the southwest property line of Dune Acres. This fuel break provides a prepared defensive break to protect the community from wildfire encroachment, while at the same time maintaining the northern edge of the 800-acre Cowles Dune Prescribed Fire Unit. Geoarchaeology of the Tolleston Beach, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore MWAC is conducting geoarchaeological research on the Tolleston Dune, focusing on how eolian processes affect archeological resources. The relation of a sparse archeological record on the Tolleston Dune to past human occupation in that area cannot be answered without understanding the geologic setting – the history of dune migration and its effects on the preservation of archaeological sites. left: sample collected from a shovel test. right: Vibracoring on the Tolleston Dune Junior Ranger Activities Indiana Dunes National Park has a lot to explore, both in the park and online. Check out this page for fun things to do to explore the park virtually. Become a Junior Ranger Today! Sand dune with pine tree and Lake Michigan in the background. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Parks in Science History Parks in Science History is a series of articles and videos made in cooperation with graduate students from various universities. They highlight the roles that national parks have played in the history of science and, therefore, the world's intellectual heritage. A woman looking through binoculars Protecting the Century of Progress Homes and the Community of Beverly Shores The Century of Progress Homes are situated among the oak trees and dune grasses of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. These homes which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, are in the Wildland Urban Interface leaving them vulnerable to wildfire. For the last several years, the area south of the homes has been burned in a series of prescribed fires to reduce the amount of vegetation in the area should a wildfire occur. Two firefighters monitor a fire while standing in a road in front of a fire engine. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Indiana Dunes National Park, Indiana Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] dune with view of lake superior Understanding Dune Prehistory Along Southern Lake Michigan Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore contains 15,000 acres of the last remaining intact dune lands between Chicago, IL and Michigan City, IN. Park-wide inventories indicate difference in distribution and density of materials between the lakeshore’s east and west units. Current research examines hypotheses for these discrepancies, including relative landform age, sedimentary processes within dune formations, and differences in middle to late Holocene human land use. Sunshine Flowers of Fall Park Ranger Julie Larsen gives us her unique insights about the goldenrod wildflower species found thought the Indiana Dunes.
Indiana Dunes National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The SINGING SANDS 2021-22 Park Guide • MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR VISIT 4-5 • THINGS TO DO & BEACHES 6-7 • EVENTS & RANGER PROGRAMS 8 • PARK MAP 12-13 • KIDS PAGE 14 • HIKING & TRAIL MAPS 17-22 • BEACH PARKING: (219) 395-1003 How to Use This Trip Planner Welcome to two parks, one national and one state, both named Indiana Dunes. This guide will be your one stop shop for activities, safety tips, maps, rules, and fun ideas for your visit to Indiana Dunes State and National parks. You will find a map of the entire area in the centerfold of the paper. Use that to navigate your way around the area. Check out the index here to find the pages with details on camping, hiking, or trails. This guide has it all. Take it to the next level with the new National Park Service app. Download it from your app store by searching National Parks. Then search for Indiana Dunes. The app will give you real-time GPS data on your location and what you can do at each spot. NATIONAL PARK INFORMATION PARK WEBSITE Scan QR code or visit: NPS.gov/INDU Park Hours: Open 6:00 am – 11:00 pm Central Time (CT) unless otherwise posted. You will notice QR codes throughout the paper which will direct you to web sites with more content, photos, or video to help you plan your trip. We have a variety of programs available all year long, and the best place to find information on those fun activities with our staff is on our website calendar located at NPS.gov/INDU. Click on calendar to search by date to see what is happening during your visit and how you can join us. Most of our programs are free, but many require advance registration. Indiana Dunes Visitor Center Whether you are here for an hour or a week, this trip planner is your essential tool for a fun, safe visit to the Indiana Dunes. Paul H. Douglas Center for Environmental Education Two Great Parks, One Great Place Phone: (219) 395-1882 Open 9:00 am to 4:00 pm (Due to COVID) (CT) Address: 1215 SR-49 Porter, IN 46304 Phone: (219) 395-1824 Open 9:00 am to 5:00 pm (CT) Address: 100 North Lake Street Gary, IN 46403 MAILING ADDRESS: Indiana Dunes National Park 1100 N. Mineral Springs Road Porter, IN 46304 The Official NPS App is HERE Download Now Search “National Park Service” in the app stores or use the QR code. Indiana Dunes National Park Indiana Dunes State Park Call 1-800-PARKTIP (727-5847) to report emergencies and suspicious or criminal activity. Your adventure guide to the National Park Indiana Dunes Visitor Center Find all of your orientation needs here. Talk to a ranger and learn about the park’s locations, activities, programs, and nearby attractions. View two short films about the park and the region. Spend some time in the activity room and check out the gift shop. Scan for Visitor Center’s website 1215 SR-49 Porter, IN 46304 Phone: (219) 395-1882 Paul H. Douglas Center for Environmental Education - Interactive nature programs, activities, unique live animals, and exhibits can be found here. Hike through the beautiful Miller Woods, to the beach. Children can also explore the outdoor Nature Play Zone. Scan for Douglas Center’s website 100 North Lake Street Gary, IN 46403 Phone: (219) 395-1824 NATIONAL PARK Indiana Dunes State Park’s Nature Center A variety of hands-on exhibits serving as a fantastic introduction to the wonders of the Indiana Dunes and its habitats. Here interpretive naturalists offer experiences via hikes, live animals, indoor programs, and special events to a range of audiences. Scan for State Park’s website 1600 N. 25 E. Chesterton, IN 46304 Phone: (219) 926-1390 STATE PARK Over 25 distinct locations to choose from, stretched across 15 miles of the southern shore of Lake Michigan, measuring over 15,000 acres between Gary and Michigan City, IN. One contiguous landscape, Park is composed of a large recreation area and 1,588 acres of state designated nature preserves and national natural landmarks. All areas free except West Beach, $6 per vehicle, $30 per bus, applies Memorial Day - Labor Day. (Expanded Amenity Fee) See page 4 for accepted passes. Daily entrance fee: $7 Indiana resident vehicle or $12 nonresident vehicle. See page 4 for accepted passes. Dunewood Campground: $25 per night - primitive. Campground closed from Nov 2 to Mar 31. Reservations Only. See page 6. Sites include 50 amp electrical service and access to shower houses. $24.61 Sun-Wed. $32.10 Thur-Sat. For reservations, visit camp.IN.gov CONCESSIONS Indiana Dunes Visitor Center Gift Shop, West Beach Snack Bar & Gift Shop (seasonal), Portage Lakefront and Riverwalk Pavilion Snack Bar (seasonal). Food service and gift shop available at beach pavilion. Gift shop available at nature center. Supplies, food, and gifts available at camp store. BATHHOUSE / PAVILION West Beach Bathhouse: Seasonal restrooms, potable water, indoor showers, and lockers. Portage Lakefront and Riverwalk Pavilion
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Official Trip Planner of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore The SINGING SANDS 2016 - Vol. 37 No. 1 - 50th Year Anniversary Saving the Dunes: Then and Now by: Nicole Barker, Executive Director, Save the Dunes 100 Years Let’s Celebrate! The National Park Service turns 100 on August 25, 2016, and everyone can take part in the celebration! The centennial will kick off a second century of stewardship of America’s national parks and engaging communities through recreation, conservation, and historic preservation programs. We invite you to find your park and discover the national parks and programs in your own backyard! Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore turns 50 on November 5, 2016. We invite you to take part in the celebrations happening throughout this special year. Contact Information ADDRESS Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore 1100 N. Mineral Springs Road Porter, IN 46304 (GPS - N41.6336 W87.0544) PHONE 219-395-1882 visitor information E-MAIL indu_communications@nps.gov WEBSITE www.nps.gov/indu www.facebook.com/ IndianaDunesNL I t’s a simple fact: the dunes would not have been saved for the enjoyment of future generations without the work of passionate advocates. The fight to save the dunes began in the early 1900s. A diverse group of people rallied around the cause as development sprawled from Chicago towards Northwest Indiana at an alarming pace. They succeeded in establishing the Indiana Dunes State Park in the 1920s, but there were still pristine areas along the lake threatened by development. Through two World Wars and the Great Depression, advocates for the dunes never gave up hope. The Save the Dunes Council formed in 1952 under the leadership of Dorothy Buell, an English teacher who spoke eloquently of the need for preservation. Thankfully, their call for a national park in the dunes was heard by Senator Paul Douglas of Illinois. With a champion in the halls of Congress, the group succeeded in establishing our beloved Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore in 1966. The park was created in a compromise that would shape Northwest Indiana’s identity going forward–a port would also be developed, and the region would forever have the challenge of balancing the needs of nature, industry and community. Save the Dunes is proud to carry on that work today. The organization has worked tirelessly in the decades since to address challenges that the founding members might never have imagined. In the years following the creation of the park, notable Save the Dunes members organized opposition to projects Today, Save the Dunes is keenly focused on threats to the natural resources and biodiversity of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. As the 7th most diverse unit in the National Park System, there is a lot to lose if we do not properly steward this incredible resource we have in our backyards. The top threats to the dunes today are invasive species, potential climate change impacts, fragmentation, and lack of sufficient funds to address these threats effectively. Save the Dunes is hard at work protecting our special dunes biodiversity by securing funding, planning for climate change adaptation strategies, and spearheading regional collaborations between government agencies, land trusts, nonprofits, heavy industry, and the community. As we approach the 50th anniversary of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Save the Dunes reflects on the struggles behind us, while adapting to address the challenges of today Senator Paul H. Douglas leading the charge to save the dunes. and tomorrow. What began as an inspiring group of passionate volunteer activists has grown into a diverse organization with environmental professionals on staff, working every day to build strong partnerships across the region. Saving the dunes today means working together across many perceived boundaries to recognize our common interests and our shared love of the lakeshore. Through collaboration, mutual respect, positive energy and the right know-how, we can ensure that generations to come will have the dunes to enjoy as a place of wonder and respite. It may take time, but if looking out on the dunes shows us anything, it is that amazing things happen over time in the right environment. Happy 50th, INDU. I encourage you to learn more about our work at www.savedunes.org, seek us out on Facebook and on Twitter at @ savedunesin. Dorothy Buell directed her enthusiasm, determination, and fearlessness toward a single goal, saving the Indiana Dunes! Visitor Centers - A Great Place to Start Unless otherwise posted, the public areas of the park are open from sunrise to 30 minutes after sunset. Most parking areas are open from 7:00 a.m. until 30 minutes after sunset. Lake View parking area remains open until 11:00 p.m. https://www.flickr.com/photos/ indianadunes http://twitter.com/IndianaDunesNPS Call 1-800-PARKTIP (727-5847) to report emergencies, and suspicious or criminal activity. Printed on Recycled P
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Official Trip Planner of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore The SINGING SANDS Summer 2015 - Vol. 36 No. 1 Celebrate 50 Years with 50 Ways to Play Mission of the National Park Service The National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout this country and the world. Mission of Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Preserve, restore, and protect the outstanding ecological and biological diversity along with the geological features that characterize the southern shore of Lake Michigan. Provide access for a large diverse population to experience natural, scenic open spaces and recreational, scientific, historical features, and inspirational, and educational opportunities. Contact Information ADDRESS Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore 1100 N. Mineral Springs Road Porter, IN 46304 (GPS - N41.6336 W87.0544) PHONE 219-926-7561 visitor information E-MAIL indu_communications@nps.gov WEBSITE www.nps.gov/indu www.facebook.com/ IndianaDunesNL I f you haven’t heard the news yet, let me be the first to tell you that Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore will turn 50 next year. No black balloons or tiptoeing around the fact for this 50th birthday! We plan to shout it far and wide that our national park will hit the half century mark in 2016. We will also be celebrating other important birthdays next year, including the Centennial anniversary of the National Park Service and the 200th birthday of the state of Indiana! Stay tuned for a year full of celebrations. As part of the 50th anniversary of the park, we and our partners are sponsoring a variety of activities throughout the year, and we want to focus on how visitors play in our Indiana Dunes. Why focus on play, you may ask? Parents used to think of play time as something you send your kids to do so you can have a few hours to clean the house. Today, though, it is often an endangered activity that has to be scheduled by parents. Scientists are showing that children and adults need to “play” outdoors to connect with nature for our mental and physical health. Educators recognize that playing for young children is integral to their growth and development. Doctors are prescribing outdoor recreation to keep their patients fit and healthy. The dunes are not too old for play either! This park provides a plethora of play opportunities with 15 miles of beach, 45 miles of trails and 15,000 acres of fun. How do you play in the park? Send us your suggestions, photos, and activities. We want to include them in a new publication we are creating, “50 Ways to Play at Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore.” The end product will likely be an online directory of ideas that others can use for planning their trips to the dunes. Please send your submissions Here are a couple ideas from my family to get you started. I have two teenagers, and I have to drag them away from their social and school activities. But when I asked them what their favorite dunes activities were, here is what they told me. 1. Camping: When summer arrives, we make time for camping. We pack up the dog and the car with our gear, and we hit the road. The Dunewood Campground at the national lakeshore is a great destination. The sites are well spaced. The bathrooms are clean, and the beach and trails are close by. You don’t have to make reservations because it is first-come, first-served. So we try to get there early on Friday to get a campsite. The nice thing is that all the campsites are great! 3. Kayaking: This summer my kids want to learn how to kayak. We love water sports and kayakng will be our new challenge for this summer. Even though we don’t have our own kayaks, we plan to join park staff at the beach to learn how to paddle in Lake Michigan. Park staff will be roving some east end beaches with kayaks and other water toys this summer on the weekends. Contact the visitor center at 219-395-1882 to find out when and where they will be stationed and join them for some water play in the lake. No matter what your favorite activity is—hiking, skiing, swimming, or just relaxing on the beach, your neighborhood national park at Indiana Dunes is the place to play. Help us celebrate our 50th anniversary by sharing your favorite family activities as we develop our “50 Ways to Play in the Dunes.” 2. Kite Flying: Their next suggestion is kite flying at the beach. My son is an avid kite flyer and has lost a few kites during his 17 years! Lakeview is an excellent beach area for launching a kite with lots of open sky. The park will be hosting a kite making event on Saturday and Sunday, July 11 & 12 at the Douglas Center in conjunction with the Gary Air Show. Participants can make their own kites and t

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