"Middle Islands Passage, Isle Royale National Park, 2015." by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Isle Royale

National Park - Michigan

Isle Royale National Park is a remote island cluster in Lake Superior, near Michigan’s border with Canada. It’s a car-free wilderness of forests, lakes and waterways, where moose and wolves roam. The Greenstone Ridge Trail links the Windigo Harbor in the west and Rock Harbor in the east. The 19th-century Rock Harbor Lighthouse has a small museum. Dive sites in the lake include several shipwrecks.

maps

Official visitor map of Isle Royale National Park (NP) in Michigan. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Isle Royale - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Isle Royale National Park (NP) in Michigan. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

brochures

Visitor Guide to Isle Royale National Park (NP) in Michigan. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Isle Royale - Visitor Guide 2021

Visitor Guide to Isle Royale National Park (NP) in Michigan. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/isro/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_Royale_National_Park Isle Royale National Park is a remote island cluster in Lake Superior, near Michigan’s border with Canada. It’s a car-free wilderness of forests, lakes and waterways, where moose and wolves roam. The Greenstone Ridge Trail links the Windigo Harbor in the west and Rock Harbor in the east. The 19th-century Rock Harbor Lighthouse has a small museum. Dive sites in the lake include several shipwrecks. Explore a rugged, isolated island, far from the sights and sounds of civilization. Surrounded by Lake Superior, Isle Royale offers unparalleled solitude and adventures for backpackers, hikers, boaters, kayakers, canoeists and scuba divers. Here, amid stunning scenic beauty, you'll find opportunities for reflection and discovery, and make memories that last a lifetime. Isle Royale National Park headquarters is located in Houghton, MI. Visit the Houghton page on the Isle Royale National Park website for additional information and a map on how to access the visitor center. Houghton Visitor Center The Houghton Visitor Center is located in Houghton, Michigan. It is the mainland headquarters for Isle Royale National Park. Trip planning assistance, Ranger III tickets and information, a park store, and viewing the park film are available. The Visitor Center is located on the east end of Lakeshore Dr. in downtown Houghton, MI on the Keewenaw Waterway adjacent to the historic Dee Stadium. If traveling north on US41, turn right on Lakeshore Dr. just as you enter downtown Houghton on Shelden Avenue. The turn is adjacent to the Chamber of Commerce. If traveling north on M26, merge with US41 South. As you leave downtown use the left lane to briefly return to Shelden Ave and US41 North. Then take a right turn on Lakeshore Dr. Rock Harbor Visitor Center The Rock Harbor Visitor Center is located in Rock Harbor on the northeast end of Isle Royale National Park. It is only accessible by boat or seaplane. Permitting and fee payment, trip planning assistance, and a park store area available. Rock Harbor is accessible by ferry, private boat, or seaplane. The Ranger III (Houghton, MI), Isle Royale Queen IV (Copper Harbor, MI), and Voyageur II (Grand Portage, MN) boat ferries have service to Rock Harbor. Isle Royale Seaplanes (Houghton, MI and Grand Marais, MN) also has service to Rock Harbor. The Rock Harbor Visitor Center is located at the end of the main passenger ferry dock beneath the breezeway. Windigo Visitor Center The Windigo Visitor Center is located in Windigo on the southwest end of Isle Royale National Park. It is only accessible by boat or seaplane. Permitting and fee payment, trip planning assistance, a park store, and exhibits are available. Windigo is accessible by ferry, private boat, or seaplane. The Voyageur II (Grand Portage, MN) and Seahunter III (Grand Portage, MN) boat ferries have service to Windigo. Isle Royale Seaplanes (Houghton, MI) also has service to Windigo. The Windigo Visitor Center is located up a hill to the left of the main ferry dock. It is a brown building with a front porch. Beaver Island Campground Located in the center of Washington Harbor, near Windigo. All shelters are water facing. Boats can stay at the dock overnight. Stay limit: 3 nights effective from 6/1 - Labor Day annually. Shelters: 3 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 2'-5' Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Aerial View of Washington Harbor and Beaver Island Aerial View of Washington Harbor and Beaver Island. Beaver Island is located in the center of Washington Harbor. Beaver Island Dock L Shaped Dock along Lake Superior Beaver Island is a popular water access-only campground. Paddlers at Beaver Island Shelter Two kayaks rest in front of a campground shelter. Where will your Isle Royale paddles take you? Belle Isle Campground A campground located on Belle Isle, in Belle Harbor, on the northeast end of Isle Royale National Park. Boats can use dock for overnight stays. Stay limit: 5 nights, effective 6/1 – Labor Day. Shelters: 6 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 13’ Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Aerial View of Belle Isle Aerial view of Belle Isle and surrounding waterways. Belle Isle sits off the main island of Isle Royale and offers boaters and paddlers a hub to explore the northeast waterways. Belle Island Campground Shelter #1 A shelter sits along trees across a field with a blue sky above Relax at Belle Island Campground Birch Island Campground Small campground on Birch Island, near the mouth of McCargoe Cove, on the north side of Isle Royale National Park. One individual tent site and one shelter on site. Boats can stay overnight at dock. Stay limit: 3 nights June 1 - Labor Day annually. Shelters: 1 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 5' Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Birch Island Campground Birch Island Campground shelter visible across water through tress with a blue sky overhead. Birch Island Campground from the water. Caribou Island Campground Caribou Island Campground is located on the very western tip of West Caribou Island, in Rock Harbor Channel, on the northeast end of Isle Royale National Park. Boats can dock overnight. Stay limit: 3 nights effective from June 1 – Labor Day. Shelters: 2 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 10’ Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Aerial View of West Caribou Island Aerial view of West Caribou Island surrounded by the blue waters of Lake Superior. West Caribou Island is a popular campground for boaters. View of West Caribou Island View of West Caribou Island shoreline surrounded by blue water. West Caribou Island is a popular destination for boaters. Caribou Island Welcomes You Caribou Island sign with shelter in the distance behind trees. Caribou Island Shelter #1 View of Caribou Island Campground Rock Harbor Channel in the distance through trees with a shelter on the left side. Caribou Island is a popular boater campground Chippewa Harbor Campground Chippewa Harbor Campground is located in Chippewa Harbor, on the south shore of Isle Royale National Park. Trail access is via the Indian Portage Trail. Boats can stay overnight at dock. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 4 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 7’ Access: Canoe/Kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Site 25.00 1 Group Site by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Entrance to Chippewa Harbor A lichen-covered rock marks the entrance to Chippewa Harbor. The entrance to Chippewa Harbor is located on the south shore of Isle Royale National Park. Chippewa Harbor Shelter Sites Rocky shoreline with two shelters along the treeline with blue sky overhead. Shelters along the shoreline of Chippewa Harbor Daisy Farm Campground Isle Royale's largest campground is located at Daisy Farm, in Rock Harbor Channel, off of the Rock Harbor Trail, Daisy Farm Trail, and Mount Ojibway Trail. Boats can stay overnight at dock. Ranger Station staffed seasonally. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 16 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 9’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Daisy Farm Campground Sunrise Sunrise on the beach at Daisy Farm Campground Sunrise on the beach at Daisy Farm Campground Daisy Farm Campground Shelter Site #19 Shelter in the woods Shelters are popular camping spots on Isle Royale. Daisy Farm Campground Test Site #18 Campsite surrounded by trees with a cleared area in the foreground and picnic table in the backgroun An example of a Daisy Farm Campground tent site. Duncan Bay Campground Duncan Bay Campground is located on the west end of Duncan Bay, on the northeast end of Isle Royale National Park. Boats can stay overnight at dock. Stay limit: Three nights from June 2 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 2 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 6’ Access: Canoe/Kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Aerial View of the Water and Shoreline of Duncan Bay Beautiful blues highlight the waters of Duncan Bay. Duncan Bay is a popular haven for boaters and paddlers. Duncan Bay Campground Shelter A Campground Shelter overlooking the water along Duncan Bay Campground shelter along Duncan Bay Duncan Narrows Campground Duncan Narrows Campground is located in the narrows of Duncan Bay on the northeast end of Isle Royale National Park. Boats can stay overnight at dock. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 2 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 6’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Aerial View of Duncan Bay Narrows Aerial view of the blue waters of Duncan Bay Narrows and the surrounding green, boreal forest. Duncan Bay Narrows is popular locale for boaters and paddlers in the park. Welcome to Duncan Bay Narrows Campground Campground Sign with picnic table and shelter in the background Duncan Bay Narrows is a campground for boaters and paddlers. East Chickenbone Campground An inland campground located on the east end of Chickenbone Lake, off of the East Chickenbone Trail. No boater access. Canoe/kayak access using 1.2 mile portage from McCargoe Cove or .2 mile portage from Lake Livermore. Be aware that the campground is not on the shoreline - West Chickenbone Campground is more accessible for watercraft. Stay limit: Two nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Site 25.00 1 Group Site by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. View of Chickenbone Lake from the East Lake Chickenbone Trail View of aquatic vegetation and trees surrounding Chickenbone Lake. The East Lake Chickenbone Trail travels along Chickenbone Lake for part of the trail. East Chickenbone Campground Tent Site Tent in East Chickenbone Campground during fall foliage. Tent in East Chickenbone Campground during fall. Feldtmann Lake Campground Feldtmann Lake Campground is located on the shoreline of Feldtmann Lake, off the Feldtmann Lake and Feldtmann Ridge Trails, on the southwest end of Isle Royale National Park. This is an inland campground. Stay limit: Two nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 2 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Feldtmann Lake Campground Tent Site #2 Yellow tent sits on the edge of trees which sit on the edge of Feldtmann Lake. Feldtmann Lake Campground awaits off the typical Isle Royale backpacking routes. Sunrise at Feldtmann Lake Campground The sun rises through trees on the edge of Feltman Lake. A yellow tent sits in the foreground. Feldtmann Lake Campground awaits off the typical Isle Royale backpacking routes. Grace Island Campground Grace Island Campground is located on Grace Island, outside of Washington Harbor, on the southwest end of Isle Royale National Park. Boats can dock overnight. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 2 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 2’ - 4’ Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Grace Island Campground Shelter Campground shelter with a picnic table and thimbleberries Grace Island is a very popular campground for boaters. Grace Island Dock at Sunset Dock at sunset overlooking Washington Harbor with a motorboat tied off to the dock. Isle Royale provides many amazing sunset opportunities. Hatchet Lake Campground Hatchet Lake Campground is located on Hatchet Lake off of the Hatchet Lake Trail. This campground is located near the center of the island. Stay limit: Two nights form June 1 – Labor Day annually. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Camping at Hatchet Lake Campground in Fall A tent at an individual tent site with a view of Hatchet Lake in the fall. Hatchet Lake Campground is a popular stop for backpackers along the Greenstone Ridge Trail. Hatchet Lake Tent Site Blue tent at campsite amongst trees with lake visible in distance. Hatchet Lake is a major campground stop along the Greenstone Ridge Trail. Hay Bay Campground Hay Bay Campground is located in Hay Bay on the south shore of Isle Royale National Park. Boats can overnight at dock. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Depth at dock (normal conditions): 3’-7’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Hay Bay Campground Tent Site #1 Cleared area with a picnic table surrounded by trees. Hay Bay is a popular boater campground and dock. Hay Bay Dock Hay Bay of Lake Superior with a boat at dock and picnic table on the foreground grassy area, Hay Bay is a popular boater campground. Huginnin Cove Campground Huginnin Cove Campground is located at Huginnin Cove, on the north shore of Isle Royale National Park, off of the West and East Huginnin Cove Trails. Stay limit: Three consecutive nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak access. No dock available for boats. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. View of Hugunnin Cove View of the blue waters of Hugunnin Cove with the shoreline of Canada in the distance. Hugunnin Cove Campground is a quaint location to camp on the north shore of Isle Royale National Park. Sunset at Hugunnin Cove Campground Colorful sunset over Lake Superior at Hugunnin Cove Campground Hugunnin Cove Campground is an awesome location to watch sunsets. Huginnin Cove Campground Tent Site #2 Tent and camp chair looking through tress at Huginnin Cove of Lake Superior. Huginnin Cove is one of the few campgrounds along the north shore of Lake Superior. Intermediate Lake Campground Intermediate Lake Campground is located on the shoreline of Intermediate Lake. Intermediate Lake can be accessed via a .6 mile portage from Lake Richie or a .4 mile portage from Siskiwit Lake. Stay limit: Two nights effective June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak, no private boat access. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Intermediate Lake by Canoe Calm waters of a small lake greet the bow of an overturned canoe with paddles resting against it. Intermediate Lake is a small lake between Lake Richie and Siskiwit Lake Island Mine Campground Island Mine Campground is located .5 miles south from the junction of the Greenstone and Island Mine Trails, on the Island Mine Trail. This inland campground offers no canoe/kayak/boat access. Little Siskiwit River runs south of the campground, where water can usually be obtained for filtering, unless it is dried up. Check with a Visitor Center for current water status. Stay limit: Three nights effective June 1 – Labor Day annually. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 2 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Island Mine Tent Site #1 in Fall Color A small clearing covered in leaves surrounded by trees in fall color. Island Mine Campground has a small stream that provides water except in hot, dry summers. Hike at Island Mine Campground A hike sits on a fallen log surrounded by the forest in fall color. Leaves litter the ground. Island Mine Campground is full of color in the fall. Lake Richie Campground Lake Richie Campground is located on the north shore of Lake Richie, off of the Indian Portage Trail. Canoe/kayak access from .6 mile portage from Intermediate Lake, 2.0 mile portage from Moskey Basin, 1.2 miles portage from Chippewa Harbor, and .6 mile portage from Lake LeSage. Paddlers may want to consider staying at Lake Richie Canoe Campground. Stay limit: Two nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak. No private boat access. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 2 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. View of Lake Richie from Tent Site #3 View of Lake Richie with a few trees along the shoreline. Lake Richie is a popular backpacking campground. Lake Richie Campground Tent Site #3 A tent sits on a cleared area surrounded by trees. Which site will you choose? Lake Richie Campground: Group Site #2 Wide view of group campsite, clearing surrounded by trees. The larger group sites accommodate parties of 7-10 Lake Richie Canoe Campground Lake Richie Canoe Campground is located on the north shore of Lake Richie. Canoe/kayak access via the .6 mile portage from Intermediate Lake, the 1.2 mile portage from Chippewa Harbor, the 2.0 mile portage from Moskey Basin, and the .6 mile portage from Lake LeSage. Stay limit: Two nights effective from June 1st – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak. No private boat access. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Lake Richie Canoe Campsite Approaching from the Water From the water, a view of the distant shoreline where the Lake Richie Canoe Campsite is located. Paddling to Lake Richie Canoe Campsite Lake Richie Canoe Campsite From the Water Near Shore From the water, a view of the shoreline with evergreen trees, bare rock, and blue sky. A quiet place to spend a night. Lake Richie Canoe Campsite with Tent Lake Richie Canoe Campsite with sign post in foreground, tent surrounded by trees in distance. Lake Richie Canoe Campsite is one of the most remote campsites in the park. Lake Whittlesey Campground Lake Whittlesey Campground is located on the north shore of Lake Whittlesey. Consecutive night stay limit is two nights. Three individual tent sites are available. No boat access. Canoe/kayak access via .6 mile portage from Wood Lake and .6 mile portage from Chippewa Harbor. Stay limit: Three nights effective June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak, no private boat or trail access. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. View of Lake Whittlesey Tent in shadow beneath trees with lake in the distance. There are many great places to go on Isle Royale. Lake Whittlesey Tent Site Tent surrounded by trees. Paddling the interior of Isle Royale will bring you to the most remote campgrounds in the park. Lane Cove Campground Lane Cove Campground is located in Lane Cove, on the north shore of Isle Royale National Park, off of the Lane Cove Trail. The Lane Cove Trail can be accessed via the Greenstone Ridge Trail. Stay limit: Three nights effective June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/Kayak. No boat access. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Lane Cove Campground Tent Site #5 Backpack with a hat atop it resting in a cleared area, Trees edge the shoreline of Lake Superior. Lane Cove is one of the few campground on the north side of Isle Royale Lane Cove Campground Tent Site #5 An empty campsite ringed by trees along Lake Superior. A tent site waiting for you... Lane Cove Campground on the edge of Lake Superior Yellow Tent in a campsite along Lake Superior with trees along the shoreline. Lane Cove Campground can be very crowded during July and August. Little Todd Campground Little Todd Campground is located in Little Todd, on the north shore of Isle Royale National Park, off of the Minong Ridge Trail. Stay limit: Two nights effective June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak. No boat access. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Little Todd Campground with Tent at Sunset Tent set up at a Little Todd Campground tent site at sunset. Little Todd Campground is a scenic location on the north shore of the island. Little Todd Harbor Shoreline Lake Superior waves lapping the rocky shoreline of Little Todd Harbor. Little Todd Harbor offers majestic views of Lake Superior and Canada Malone Bay Campground Malone Bay Campground is located in Malone Bay, on the south shore of Isle Royale National Park, off of the Ishpeming Trail. Boats can overnight at dock. A ranger station, information station, and dock can be found just further east of the campground. The ranger station is not always staffed. Stay limit: Three nights effective June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 5 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 3’-6’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 2 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. View of Malone Bay View of the blue waters of Malone Bay from the shoreline. Malone Bay Campground is a popular spot on the south shore of the park. Malone Bay Campground Shelter #1 A shelter sits on the Lake Superior shoreline. Malone Bay Campground has shelters that overlook Lake Superior Malone Bay Campground Shelters 4 & 5 Trail in a field to two shelters along the forest's edge. There are 5 shelters and no small-party tent sites at Malone Bay Campground. McCargoe Cove Campground McCargoe Cove Campground is located in McCargoe Cove, on the north shore of Isle Royale National Park, off of the Indian Portage and East Chickenbone Trails. Boats can overnight at dock. Canoe/kayak access from Lake Superior or 1.2 mile portage from Chickenbone Lake. Stay limit: Three nights effective from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 6 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 7’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. McCargoe Cove Dock Dock stretching into McCargoe Cove. Shoreline visible across cove. If you need transportation to McCargoe Cove you can use the Voyageur II or a water taxi from Rock Harbor Lodge. McCargoe Cove Campground Shelter Rock trail leading to a shelter along the forest's edge. McCargoe Cove is a popular campground. Merritt Lane Campground Merritt Lane Campground is located in Merritt Lane on the northeast end of Isle Royale National Park. Boats can overnight at dock. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 1 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 8’ Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Merritt Lane Campground Tent Site A child pressed against a tent on the edge of Lake Superior. I see you! View of Merrit Lane View of Merrit Lane on Lake Superior with the edge of the shelter visible. Merritt Lane Campground is a popular paddling destination. Merritt Lane Campground Shelter Close up view of the front, mesh side of Isle Royale shelters. Shelters are first-come, first-serve on Isle Royale. Moskey Basin Campground Moskey Basin Campground is located in Moskey Basin at the west end of Rock Harbor Channel, off of the Indian Portage and Rock Harbor Trails. Boats can overnight at dock. Canoe/kayak access from Rock Harbor Channel or via 2.0 mile portage from Lake Richie. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 6 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 8’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 2 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Sunset at Moskey Basin Campground Soft sunset with small moon visible at Moskey Basin Campground. Gorgeous sunrises and sunsets can be viewed from Moskey Basin Campground. Moskey Basin Campground Shelter #7 Campground shelter on the water's edge surrounded by trees. Moskey Basin has sites right along the water's edge. Moskey Basin Campground Group Site #1 Large dirt clearing surrounded by trees with a picnic table. Group campsites are by reservation ahead of time for parties greater than 6 people. Moskey Basin Campground: View from Shelter #4 Blue sky, calm water, rock shoreline in foreground. Moskey Basin offers many sites right on the water's edge. North Desor Campground North Desor Campground is located on the north side of Lake Desor off of the Minong Ridge Trail. There is no boat/canoe/kayak access. Stay limit: Two nights from June 1 – Labor Day. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. View of Lake Desor from North Lake Desor Campground View of the blue waters of Lake Desor from the North Lake Desor Campground. Lake Desor is Isle Royale National Park's second largest inland lake. Campsite at North Lake Desor Campground in Fall Golden sugar maple leaves surround a tent at a campsite at North Lake Desor Campground in fall. North Lake Desor Campground is a beautiful location to stay at in the fall. Pickerel Cove Campground Pickerel Cove Campground is located in Pickerel Cove on the north shore of Isle Royale National Park. Canoe/kayak access from Pickerel Cove or via .1 mile portage from Lake Superior. Stay limit: Two nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak. No dock for boats. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Pickerel Cove Tent Site A tent sits on a small peninsula in Lake Superior. Trees rise behind the tent. There is only one tent site on this picturesque cove designed for paddlers. Aerial View of Herring Bay and Pickerel Cove Aerial view of the blue waters of Herring Bay and Pickerel Cove. Aerial view of the blue waters of Herring Bay and Pickerel Cove. Rock Harbor Campground Rock Harbor Campground is located in Rock Harbor on the northeast end of Isle Royale, off of the Rock Harbor and Tobin Harbor Trails. Additional fees for boats to stay overnight at marina. Stay limit: One night from June 1 – September 15 annually. Shelters: 9 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 3’-12’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Rock Harbor Campground Shelter #3 Wooden campground shelter with picnic table in front. Shelters are very popular and not reservable. Rock Harbor Campground Tent Site #13 Bare ground spot between trees for setting up a camping tent with a picnic table in foreground. Rock Harbor Campground is the busiest in the park being closest to the transportation hub for RANGER III, QUEEN IV, and seaplane. Aerial View of Rock Harbor Aerial view of Rock Harbor and the Rock Harbor Lodge complex. The Rock Harbor Lodge provides amenities and lodging to the Rock Harbor area. Water Filling Station in the Rock Harbor Campground Water spigot and faucet in the woods. Rock Harbor and Washington Creek campgrounds are the only campgrounds where potable water is available. Rock Harbor Campground Group Site #1 Campsite for multiple tents with several open spaces surrounded by trees. There are 3 group sites for parties of 7-10 people camping and traveling together. Siskiwit Bay Campground Siskiwit Bay Campground is located in Siskiwit Bay on the southwest end of Isle Royale National Park, off of the Island Mine and Feldtmann Ridge Trails. Boats can overnight at dock. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 to Labor Day annually. Shelters: 2 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 2’-6’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Sunset at Siskiwit Bay Dock Sunset on the horizon of Siskiwit Bay, Lake Superior with a dock stretching into the water Another magical sunset on Isle Royale. South Lake Desor Campground South Lake Desor Campground is located inland on the south side of Lake Desor off of the Greenstone Ridge Trail. Stay limit: Two nights effective from June 1 – Labor Day. Access: No canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Aerial View of Lake Desor Aerial view of the blue waters of Lake Desor surrounded by a green hardwood forest. Lake Desor is the second largest inland lake at Isle Royale National Park. Sunset at South Lake Desor Campground Soft sunset at South Lake Desor Campground. South Lake Desor Campground is a great place for sunsets. South Desor Campground Tent Site A tent on a bare patch of ground surrounded by trees at South Desor Campground. A tent site at South Desor Campground Three Mile Campground Three Mile Campground is located on Rock Harbor Channel off of the Rock Harbor and Mount Franklin Trails. Boats can overnight at dock. Stay limit: One night effective June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 8 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 9’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Three Mile Campground Tent Site #9 Scenic view of Lake Superior's Rock Harbor Channel from a camp site with a tent. Three Mile Campground is very busy due to its proximity to Rock Harbor and the ferry terminals. Three Mile Campground Shelter Site #11 Campground shelter with picnic table. Shelters are very popular on Isle Royale. Don't expect one to be available your first evening in a campground. Three Mile Campground Dock Dock in Lake Superior through a tunnel of trees. Enjoy chilling your feet off the Three Mile Campground dock. Todd Harbor Campground Todd Harbor Campground is located in Todd Harbor on the north shore of Isle Royale National Park, off of the Minong Ridge Trail. Boats can overnight at dock. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 1 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 2’. Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Todd Harbor Tent Site A campsite with a tent and picnic table Where will you spend the night on Isle Royale? Sunset at Todd Harbor Campground Multi-colored sunset at Todd Harbor Campground. Todd Harbor Campground is a popular campground on the north shore of Isle Royale. Todd Harbor Scenic Shoreline Shoreline of Todd Harbor, Lake Superior with blue sky and barrier islands. Isle Royale offers many scenic vistas along its 337 miles of shoreline. Tookers Island Campground Tookers Island Campground is located on Tookers Island in Rock Harbor Channel. Boats can overnight at dock. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 2 Depth at dock (normal conditions): 7’ Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Aerial View of Tookers Island and Shaw Island Aerial view of islands in Lake Superior on the edge of Isle Royale Some of the park's 36 campgrounds can be found on small islands. Tookers Campground Shelter #1 Campground Shelter with picnic table. Tookers Island is a popular overnight spot near Rock Harbor for boaters. Tookers Island Campground Shelter #2 Campground shelter with picnic table. Tookers Island is a popular overnight spot near Rock Harbor for boaters. Tookers Island Campground Shelters 1 & 2 A trail through grass leading to two campground shelters with trees behind them. Tookers Island is a small campground having only two shelters. Washington Creek Campground Washington Creek Campground is located along Washington Creek near Windigo on the southwest end of Isle Royale, off of the Feldtmann Lake, Minong, and Greenstone Ridge Trails. The Windigo Visitor Center, Windigo Store, and Windigo Comfort Station are all accessible from the campground. Boats can stay at Windigo Dock (average depth at dock 4'-20') or stay and walk .3 miles to campground. Stay limit: Three nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Shelters: 10 Access: Canoe/kayak/private boat Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 4 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Washigton Creek As Seen From the Air Aerial view of the winding Washington Creek surrounded by a green forest. Washington Creek is a popular spot to look for moose. Washington Creek Campground Tent Site #5 Tent campsite; sign post with bare patch of ground and picnic table surrounded by trees.ounded by tr Washington Creek Campground has more shelter sites than tent sites. Washington Creek Campground Tent Site Tents pitched in a tent site with a picnic table; all surrounded by trees. Where will you pitch your tent? Washington Creek Campground Shelter Wooden shelter for camping with a picnic table. A shelter in Washingington Creek Campground West Chickenbone Campground West Chickenbone Campground is located on the west end of Chickenbone Lake, off of the Indian Portage Trail This inland campground has no boater access. Canoe/kayak access from the 1.2 mile portage from McCargoe Cove or the .2 mile portage from Lake Livermore. Stay limit: two nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Group Tent Sites 25.00 3 Group Sites by advanced reservation only. All parties of 7 or more must submit group permit requests through the park's online request system. The fee is a per permit cost for each party within a group of 7 or more. Aerial View of Chickenbone Lake Aerial view of the blue water of Chickenbone Lake. Chickenbone Lake has two campgrounds that are used by many backpackers traveling the Greenstone Ridge Trail. View of Chickenbone Lake coming from McCargoe Cove. View of marshy Chickenbone Lake area. This view greets many backpackers and paddlers heading from McCargoe Cove to Chickenbone Lake. West Chickenbone Campground Test Site Tent on the shores of Chickenbone Lake with trees along the shoreline. A tent site at West Chickenbone Campground Wood Lake Campground Wood Lake Campground is located inland on the north shore of Wood Lake. Wood Lake can be accessed via a .6 mile portage from Lake Whittlesey or from Siskiwit Lake. Stay limit: Two nights from June 1 – Labor Day annually. Access: Canoe/kayak. No private boat access. Small-party Camping (6 people or less) 0.00 No fee for small-party camping. A free overnight permit is required. Wood Lake A canoe on the rocky shoreline of Wood Lake stretching into the water with scenery. Wood Lake is one of the most isolated campgrounds in the park. Duncan Bay Narrows View from above the trees looking down at Duncan Bay Narrows, trees, Lake Superior, and Canada. Isle Royale, located in the northwestern corner of Lake Superior, offers views of the Canadian shoreline. Winter Ice Floes Ice floes float in a harbor Isle Royale National Park is closed in winter, with the exception of a few visiting researchers. Aerial View of Belle Harbor Aerial View of Belle Harbor One of the best ways to view Isle Royale's land and water is from the air. Bull Moose Young bull moose browsing for food Moose are one of the few mammal species who have journeyed to the island. Rock of Ages Lighthouse Aerial view of Rock of Ages Lighthouse Rock of Ages is one of four lighthouses at Isle Royale National Park. Aurora Borealis Over Isle Royale National Park Diverse colored Aurora Borealis in the night sky Isle Royale National Park's dark skies make it an excellent location to enjoy nighttime phenomenon, like the Aurora Borealis. Anderson/Scotland Fishery Near the south end of Amygdaloid Island, tucked into a small bay fronting Amygdaloid Channel lies the fish camp of Conrad Scotland and Andrew Anderson, two Norwegian bachelors of no relation to other Isle Royale Scandinavian fishing families. The Amygdaloid Island Ranger Station occupies the site today with NPS personnel making use of the cabin built by Scotland and Anderson. cabin on left side and a fish house on right side, looking out to Amygdaloid Channel Birch Island Fishery Captain Robert L. Francis of Duluth owned and operated a fishery on Birch Island in McCargoe Cove. Francis was known to have the largest pound net operation on Isle Royale, first operating at Francis Point, then Siskiwit Bay in 1888, and finally at the Birch Island location. cabin overlooking McCargoe Cove, dock in middle, fish house at far right American Fur Company Fisheries The first commercial fishing station on Isle Royale, established in July, 1837, was located on Belle Isle (then called Fish Island) on the site of the present campground. open field on Belle Isle where American Fur Company was located Swanson Fishery Four fishermen are recounted at Todd Harbor: Dan Lind, Dan Wilson, Rose and McLain, and Francis. Another interview lists 2 boats at Big Todd Harbor and 3 at Little Todd Harbor. It is quite possible that one of the fishermen listed at Big Todd Harbor may have operated from Little Todd. Much about the fishery at Little Todd remains ambiguous. fishhouse jutting out from Little Todd Harbor, boat docked in front, trees surrounding the water Crystal Cove Fishery Superintendent Gibbs approved use of Crystal Cove as a fishery to Milford Johnson in 1956. At that time, Milford moved his fishing site from Star Island to the Crystal Cove location. fish net hanging in front of Crystal Cove fishery Green Isle Fishery The history of the Green Isle Fishery is not fully understood; what we know is gathered from varied sources with scant detail. Lake Superior fishing interviews conducted in 1894 (Woolman) mentions 4 fishermen listed at Todd Harbor: Dan Lind, Dan Wilson, Rose and McLain, and Francis. Another interview lists 2 boats at Big Todd Harbor and 3 at Little Todd Harbor. log cabin at Green Isle Booth Island Fishery The Booth company established a fishery at Washington harbor in 1886, and provided consistent shipping on the large-capacity, company owned America vessel, creating a broader and more consistent market for the isolated Isle Royale fishermen two fish houses on shore of Booth Island with large dock Fisherman's Home Fishery Fisherman's Home, located within a sheltered inlet on the southwest end of Isle Royale on Houghton Point, retains historic integrity as a representative commercial fishery complex. boat unloading empty fish boxes at fish house Hay Bay Fisheries Tucked into the western shore of Siskiwit Bay is a long, narrow cove that was home to several fishing camps including Sivert Anderson, Ed Kvalvick, Albert Bjorvek, and John T. Skadberg. Known as Hay Bay, the well-protected cove extends from Hay Bay Point to the confluence of Siskiwit River at the south end of the bay. fishing residence with boat out front and ladder reaching roof at Hay Bay Mindestrom Fishery About one mile south of Fisherman's Home lies a small bay and inlet known as Small or Little Boat Harbor. Used exclusively by Hans Mindestrom, this site includes the boulder gravel beach of the inlet from the north point to the south point, and the fishing area that runs south along the shoreline about a mile and a half to the McCormick Reef area. small harbor and boat in front of fish house Malone Fishery Not much is known about the operations of the Malone Bay Fishery. The structures suggest that they may have been constructed with lodging in mind. three cabins with man in front cutting tree Vodrey Fishery Godfrey Vodrey first came to Isle Royale in the 1870's to perform work for one of the mining operations on the island. Vodrey would later operate his own fish camp in a small cove, now known as Vodrey Harbor, in the early 1900s. At the time, Vodrey Harbor was one of the few remaining locations along the south shore of Isle Royale not already claimed by other fishermen. a large supply of fish net floats laid out on a table Johnson/Olson Fishery Known to the general public as Chippewa Harbor and to the Isle Royale fishermen as Johnson's Resort, this fish camp began in the mid-to-late 1800s (see also the Vodrey Fishery). The operation was for fish oil from the fat trout, or Siskiwit, that was a popular catch during the 1800s. two-story fish house with dock surrounding it and boats tied up Bangsund Fishery Jack Bangsund operated a commercial fishery business out of the Rock Harbor area. Bangsund was a squatter and never held title to any Isle Royale lands. A main residence, two sleeping cabins, and a log crib are all the structures that remain from the Bangsund era. fish house on left, cabin in center, net racks on right Anderson Fishery Victor and Andrew Anderson were commercial fisherman who operated one of only two fisheries located in the Tobin Harbor area. Later, their sons Emil (no relation to Emil Anderson of Belle Isle) and Arthur continued to operate the family owned fishery until the establishment of Isle Royale National Park. fish house with two windows and two doors Edisen Fishery The Edisen Fishery is a historic folk fish camp located at the south end of Rock Harbor. Named for its last fisherman, Pete Edisen, the site contains the only on-fish-camp-site interpretive center. fish house on left, cabin in center, net racks on right Star Island Fishery Located approximately mid-way between Rock Harbor Lodge and Rock Harbor Lighthouse is a small, rocky, five-point island called Star Island. The Johnson families were relocated to this site from the Rock Harbor Lighthouse and Edisen Fishery in 1938. The island barely provided an adequate fish camp having only a small area of soil and little room for the children to play. fish house with door open, boat next to it, cabins in back Johnson/Holte Fishery The Holte Fishery has been described as equal to the Edisen Fishery in its representation of a Scandinavian-American fishery operation during the prime fishing years, the 1920s, on Isle Royale. The Holte, Anderson, and Andrew/Scotland camps contain the only log structures built specifically for commercial fishing use in the park. well constructed log cabin with covered porch in front Mattson Fishery The Mattson fishery represents one of only two fisheries situated in the Tobin Harbor area. Folk fishermen, primarily the Mattson family, shared the area with the temporary summer residents and commercial lodge operations that catered to summer tourists. fish nets drying at operational fishery History of Commercial Fishing on Isle Royale During its history, Isle Royale has had a variety of economic activities. Of these, commercial fishing has the longest continuous history. Fishing, like mining, has left its imprint on the landscape. Nearly every inlet, island, and sound of the archipelago has had its cluster of weatherbeaten shanties, wharves, and fishhouses. 4 fishers catching fish in net McGeath/Nixon Camp The McGeath Compound, located at Crystal Cove on the northeast end of Amygdaloid Island, was originally built as a private resort compound by the McGeath family of Omaha in the early 1920s. multiple room log cabin with screened in porch out front Schofield/Clay Camp Fred Schofield sold, what would become known as Clay Island to Dr. Frank H. Clay of St. Charles Minnesota. Clay did not favor the establishment of Isle Royale National Park and presumably did not agree to the terms of a life lease. He sold his property to the U.S. government on November 16, 1938, for a total sum of $2,722.71. a bench and a chair in front of cabin with broken window screen Teleford/Coventry/Fisher Camp Worthington S. Teleford owned this property between 1916 to 1918 before selling to Edith Coventry (Brown). Coventry then sold the property to Edward A. Fisher in "either the latter part of 1923 or early 1924...". Word of mouth said Fisher was fiercely against the idea of Isle Royale becoming a National Park, but later seemed open to the idea. white log cabin with open covered front porch Mcgeath/Nixon/Mcpherren Camp Sometime following 1934, Wayne and Marjorie McPherren purchased the 20.6-acre Captain Kidd Island, near Crystal Cove and Belle Isle, from the Nixon family of Omaha. Nixon purchased Captain Kidd from the McGeath family and only owned the island for a couple of years. The McPherren's made their purchase after park establishment, using the compound as a private camp. cabin with young pine trees out front Farmer Camp In 1901, Kneut Kneutson purchased one mile of Rock Harbor shoreline containing the Snug Harbor area. Kneutson and descendents developed "Park Place" - later renamed Rock Harbor Lodge - and catered to guests until the park service concessions took over the property in 1944. Kneutson's daughter Bertha and her husband Matt Farmer conveyed .88 acres of shoreline west of the Rock Harbor Lodge to their son Earl Weston Farmer and his wife Mary M. Farmer on May 25, 1935. green painted cottage with lovely corner windows, situated overlooking Rock Harbor Johnson/Davidson Camp Erik Johnson started the small-scale Tourist's Home resort in 1902 on what was then known as Johnson Island. Johnson's resort had a large dock, main house, dining house, and several sleeping cottages. In the 1910s, Johnson sold the resort to the Davidson family of St. Paul, who built the present house c. 1922. two story house with towering stone chimney and many windows Langworthy Camp The Langworthys, like most families that owned property in Snug Harbor, purchased their land from Kneut Knuetson. In 1908 the family constructed a cottage on the property, using it as a summer retreat. When the federal government began acquiring Isle Royale lands, Amy E. Langworthy and Mary H. Langworthy held title to the .23 acres along Snug Harbor. multi level cabin with half stone chimney and large covered front porch Morse Camp In 1919 W.W. Morse built a small cottage in Snug Harbor on property he purchased from Knuet Knuetson. The property was acquired by the U.S. government in 1939 by condemnation. The cottage was removed shortly thereafter. Little else is known about the Morse family or their use of the property. triangular 1.5 story wood shingled cabin Manthey Camp Frank W. Manthey of Minneapolis, Minnesota, owned slightly over 150 acres in the Rock Harbor area. Manthey established a summer camp on the main island across from East Caribou Island. The Rock Harbor Trail bisects a portion of his former property. woman reclining on couch on front porch, man looking on from steps Tallman Camp George Tallman owned a cottage in the Rock Harbor area near the Rock Harbor Lodge. Tallman was initially favorable of park establishment and was even Chairman of the Finance Committee for the Isle Royale Protective Association. Mr. Tallman likely continued to support the Isle Royale National Park movement, however, he did not agree with the purchasing agent's appraisal of his waterfront property. ornate two story house with woman waving from front steps Still Camp In 1912, Charles A. Still built a small cottage in Snug Harbor on property he purchased from Knuet Knuetson. The Stills completed an addition to the main cottage in 1916. In addition to the main cottage, the property had an outdoor toilet and water system. cabin with log hewn covered front porch and stone chimney Sterns/Orsborn Camp Stella B. Sterns, formerly of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, owned a quarter acre piece of property in the Snug Harbor area. Structures on her property included a main cottage and a privy. Sterns was not willing to donate the property to the U.S. government and also didn't feel as if the proposed purchase price was a fair offer. During negotiations, she mentions that Homer T. Orsborn was considering buying the property at a higher price than offered by the government. cabin with large screened windows and a chair looking towards the woods Tooker Camp Two of the earliest structures on Tooker's Island, a small cottage and a boathouse, were built in 1908 by Chicago native S.C. Tooker and Peter Solem (foreman). The property would later include a main house (1928), a log cabin, an additional boathouse, an engine house, a pumphouse, a toolhouse, three privies, and a dock. elaborate camp with elevated boardwalks and large cabins and boathouses Warren Camp The Warrens strongly supported the establishment of Isle Royale as a national park. The pair declined a life lease and became the first of few landholders to gift their property to the National Park Service. Their donation consisted of the westerly one-half of lot 19, and lots 30, 31, and 32. storage cabin with small windows and single corner door Weart Camp The Warrens strongly supported the establishment of Isle Royale as a national park. The pair declined a life lease and became the first of few landholders to gift their property to the National Park Service. Their donation consisted of the westerly one-half of lot 19, and lots 30, 31, and 32. storage cabin with small windows and single corner door Emerging Concern Among “Every Day Chemicals” You may have heard the saying “all drains lead to the lake,” but it can be hard to remember that includes what is sent down sinks, toilets, and washing machines. Many things we do in the course of a day can contribute to the contamination of surface waters (lake and streams) in ways we cannot see. Some of these “every day chemicals” are known as contaminants of emerging concern. Person in stream collecting water sample Great Lakes Mapping Great Lakes Network staff assisted Midwest Region staff in a mapping project that reveals a whole new way of looking at the Great Lakes parks. oblique view of the Gull Island shoal, Apostle Islands NL, Lake Superior 2012 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Every year, the National Park Service benefits from the extraordinary contributions of dedicated volunteers. Meet the six recipients of the 2012 Hartzog Awards honoring that service. Two volunteers assisting a visitor NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Isle Royale National Park, Michigan Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] rocky shoreline Nighttime Navigation and Light Station Landscapes Lighthouses of the Great Lakes region are historic navigational aids that have guided sailors under dark skies, around dangerous coast lines, and through treacherous weather. The light station landscapes are an important cultural resource, representing developments in navigational technology and patterns of commerce and settlement. The landscape features suggest the lives of the keepers and their families who operated these lights, guiding ships through dark waters. Aerial view of a light station with cylindrical light tower, surrounded by trees and grass. NPS Investigates Sunken Ships in Isle Royale NP At least 10 wrecks of large ships, dating from 1870s to the 1950s, lie within the boundaries of Isle Royale National Park. These sites comprise one of the most intact collections of shipwrecks in the National Park System. Preserved by the cold, fresh waters of Lake Superior, shipwrecks and submerged terrestrial sites offer amazing insights into Great Lakes shipping, commercial fishing, and the early settlement of Isle Royale. Diver swims near exposed drive system. Park Air Profiles - Isle Royale National Park Air quality profile for Isle Royale National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Isle Royale NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Isle Royale NP. Aerial view of Sargent Lake surrounded by forest Using Lake Superior parks to explain the Midcontinent Rift Explaining the spectacular scenery around Lake Superior resulting from the 1.1 billion–year–old Midcontinent Rift System gives park interpreters an opportunity to discuss some of the most important processes that shape our planet and influenced the region’s settlement and growth. Kayakers paddle past sandstone rocks at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore (Seth Stein) Meet the Ranger III Ferry Meet the largest motorized vehicle in the National Park Service! a blue boat (on right) tied by a rope to a dock covered in snow. Nearshore conditions in the Great Lakes national parks: A baseline water quality and toxicological assessment Field survey results suggest generally good water quality, although nutrient concentrations were unexpectedly high near several parks, and metals and legacy pollutants continue to affect sediments and fish. Nearshore water quality monitoring station near Sand Island, Apostle Islands National Lakeshore Your Dollars at Work The collection of entrance fees and sale of passes at Isle Royale National Park directly impacts the sustaining and maintaining of visitor services. trail crew paddling boardwalk planks across lake, 3 canoes strapped together Ribenack/Merritt Camp Albert Ribenack and his two brothers, Henry and Edward, owned and operated the Hotel Lenox on the corner of Sixth Avenue West and Superior Street in Duluth, Minnesota. While little is known about Ribenack and his time spent on Isle Royale, Albert was a close friend of Alfred Merritt of Merritt Lane. After Ribenack stopped coming out to the island, Merritt acquired his Tobin Harbor property. rectangular cabin with large windows all around Ralph Camp Roy Ralph, of Omaha, Nebraska, was not initially interested in a life lease and wanted to be paid within 90 days of agreeing to sell his property. Eventually he warmed to the idea of a short-term lease of 3-years, which allowed him a few extra years on the island and some time to remove personal property. cabin covered by snow, dock damage in the foreground after a late-season storm Herbert Hoover's National Parks Herbert Hoover is not thought of as one of our better presidents, but he made lasting contributions in the national parks he established. During Herbert Hoover's presidency from 1929 to 1933, the land designated for new national parks and monuments increased by 40 percent. Sepia photo of Herbert Hoover standing at the rim of the Grand Canyon. Carlson Camp Andrew Carlson and family hailed from Two Harbors, Minnesota. Mr. Carlson sold outright to the government on August 06, 1937, not accepting a life lease in exchange for his property. The main cottage was constructed in 1913 and removed by the NPS after purchase. Lucille Snell had hoped to purchase the Carlson property, however it was already under a purchase agreement with the Isle Royale Commission. wood sided cabin with large screened in porch on left Breen/Snell Camp The Breen/Snell property was originally part of a larger stretch of land owned by Edward T. Scoville et al, which was a vestige of the old Scoville mine interests. We presume that no structures were built at this location until 1922, the summer following the December purchase. Art Mattson reportedly constructed the original cottage, which was the only structure on site during the Breen era. green painted cabin with colorful leaves scattered on the ground around it Langley Camp Thorpe Langley's property near Scoville Point consisted of a main cottage, privy, and dock. The Langley's lived in Superior, Wisconsin. Details surrounding acquistion of the Langley property by the U.S. government are unclear. It is not known whether the Langley's accepted any agreement in exchange for their property. All structures were removed shortly after federal purchase. cabin with metal bucket hanging near back door and table leaning against building exterior Campbell/Beard Camp In 1910, Henry L. Beard of Omaha Nebraska purchased a .34 acres island (Bob's Island) in Tobin Harbor. The island is nearly bare rock and is separated from Newman Island by a shallow strait. In 1919 Beard had a cabin built on the Island and spent summer vacations with his wife Katherine, her son Bob Greene and their children J. Gerald MacVeigh and Gertrude MacVeigh. green cottage with four prominent windows in front, tall grass growing in front of structure Musselman Camp William and Grace Musselman of Glen Ellen, Illinois, occupied a small island northeast of Merritt Island in Tobin Harbor. All structures including a cottage, privy, and dock were removed shortly after federal purchase. The Musselman's did not receive a life lease in exchange for their property. It is unclear whether the property was sold outright or acquired through condemnation. rectangular wood sided cabin with back door ajar Merritt Camp Alfred Merritt was from Duluth, and discovered Isle Royale as a 19 year old deck hand in 1866. He later worked at the Island Mine Company in Siskiwit Bay, and began camping at Blake Point, on what is now known as "Merritt Island." He began buying Isle Royale islands in 1908 - shortly after the recently-surveyed islands had been made available for purchase through auction in Marquette, Michigan. large cabin with many windows and wood hews exterior decoration Prince/Gale Camp Alfred Prince bought Gale Island, formerly Chicken Island, from the Bandettini Family (~2.5 acres) for his daughter, Alfreda, and grandsons, John and Phil. Alfred was aware of 1931 Park enabling legislation and knew that any purchase would immediately result in subsequent sale to the federal government. flat wood cabin with large picture window Newman Camp The Newman family were from Omaha Nebraska. E.R. Newman was the son-in-law of Tom "Omaha" Smith of Smith Island. The date of construction for their cottage is not known, but land purchaser E.G. Willemin noted... "the cottage is about 15 years old" during his survey in 1936. plain cabin with six windows in front, covered front porch Connolly Camp Charles P. Connolly, of Rockford, Illinois, purchased his property in Tobin Harbor from C.F.W. Dassler in 1914. During the time the Connolly's owned the property, a main cottage, guesthouse, boathouse, dock, and privy were constructed on the property. Connolly was overall favorable of a National Park at Isle Royale and had interest in a life lease for his family in exchange for the property. multiple story log cabin with log hewn porches encircling structure Cochrane/Savage Camp Thomas and Louise Savage, of St. Paul, Minnesota, did not accept a life lease and sold the property, known as Cochrane Island, outright in 1939. They received $3,116.58 for consideration. multiple story log cabin with log hewn porches encircling structure Edwards Camp The Reverend Maurice D. Edwards, a Presbyterian minister in St. Paul, and his family, were among the first to establish a summer residence in Tobin Harbor. The Edward's Camp was established in 1912, though they were known to have visited the island since at least 1902. The Edwards family owned two islands in Tobin Harbor. red cabin with boat resting on open front porch Dassler Camp Charles F.W. (Judge Dassler) from Leavenworth, Kansas, owned 2.23 acres with a main cabin and a sleeping cabin (as well as boathouse and dock) at the very end of Scoville Point. He also owned a 1/3 share of another 48.55 acres (the heirs of Scoville owned the other 2/3). Judge Dassler was not in favor of a national park and did not believe the public wanted one or would visit if a park were established. small blue cabin with window open, surrounded by trees and Lake Superior Hart Camp Captain Albert Hart was a squatter who occupied land north of the Kemmer location in Tobin Harbor. The Merritt family held title to this land and likely granted Hart permission to build upon the property. All structures including a cottage, privy, and dock were removed shortly after federal purchase. shoreline of Tobin Harbor, heavily wooded along waterway's edge Emerson Camp Ralph W. and Jane D. Emerson, of Omaha, Nebraska, owned 0.13 acres of land in Tobin Harbor. Ralph was a relative of the famous essayist, lecturer, and poet Ralph Waldo Emerson. The main cottage was constructed in 1908. Other structures once existing on the property include a pagoda, boathouse, woodhouse, oil/gas house, privy, tool house, and numerous docks. cabin behind dense brush, open front porch, square-looking structure How Camp Calvin How owned .16 acres in Tobin Harbor - tract 51. In 1938 he declared his willingness to donate the land to the United States in exchange for a life lease that included his wife and daughter. Mr. How seems to have tried to challenge the right of the United States to take his land in condemnation. red cabin sitting on the water's edge, screened in back porch Sigismund/Tallman Camp Squatter Gustav Sigismund of Duluth, Minnesota, built a small log cabin on the western end of Big Island, now known as Tallman Island. George Tallman purchased this island in 1931. While it is not fully understood how much time he spent there, he is known to have occupied the island and even maintained a sizeable garden on the property. Tallman also owned a small cottage in the Rock Harbor area near the Rock Harbor Lodge. small cabin overtaken by brush Sigismund/Underwood/Kemmer Camp Elizabeth Kemmer, affectionately known as "E.K.", died July 6, 1987 at the age of 94. E.K. had first come to Isle Royale in 1928 to visit her aunt Elizabeth Underwood. She decided to purchase the cottage, along with Miss Underwood, that Miss Underwood had been renting a number of years. red cabin with many windows on front and side Zuris/Seifert Camp Originally owned by John T. Zuris, the Seifert cottage was constructed in 1920. Zuris, a former attorney turned municipal court judge, hailed from Chicago, Illinois. Robert G. and Frittzi Seifert, of Lima, Ohio, first came to Isle Royale in 1922. On June 22, 1926, Frittzi Seifert purchased the one-quarter acre parcel from Mr. Zuris. looking upslope at cottage, many windows facing, underbelly visible Tooker/Bailey Camp Stephen C. Tooker, from St. Paul, Minnesota, originally owned this property before selling to Everett Bailey. Bailey was a proponent of Isle Royale National Park and sold outright to the U.S. government. picnic bench blocking front door of cabin Smith Camp Thomas "Omaha" Smith owned a 1.6-acre island just north of Scoville point in Tobin Harbor. As his nickname suggests, he was from Omaha, Nebraska. Mr. Smith was not in favor of the establishment of a national park at Isle Royale. cottage completely encircled by mostly boarded up windows Roberts/Emerson/Stack/Wolbrink Camp The Stack/Wolbrink Camp, located on Minong Island, is a good example of an early 20th century wealthy Midwesterner's private wilderness camp as a retreat that provided conveniences and sophisticated surroundings in a wilderness setting. long rectangular cabin with covered front porch Wheelock Camp Ellen Wheelock maintained a favorable attitude of Isle Royale National Park establishment. Her island property in the Tobin Harbor area is now known as Wheelock Island. small square cabin with covered front porch taking up a substantial proportion of space Barnum Island Colony he Barnum Island-based camps, or "Colony", have a high degree of integrity, and was one of the earliest recreational developments on Isle Royale. Barnum Island retains seventeen historic structures: six residential cottages, (not including the Johns Hotel, and Johns log cabin), four privies (not including the Johns double privy), two boathouses, a woodshed, and a smoke house. an aerial view of island, structures visible along shoreline, clearing at right Tourist's Home Resort Scandinavian fisherman Erick Johnson opened the Tourist's Home Resort in 1907, on what is currently known as Davidson Island in Rock Harbor. Tourist's Home was rustic, and consisted of several simple one- and two-room cottages clustered on the small island. Johnson claimed he could offer accommodations for as many as 50 people at one time. small watercraft docked in front of waterside resort Island House Resort/Singer's Resort Walter H. Singer, head of the Lake Michigan & Lake Superior transportation company, answered the need for a full-service public resort on Isle Royale in 1902. There was strong competition in the booming Great Lakes shipping industry at the turn of the century, and the biggest plans and the most money often secured domination of the most profitable shipping routes. two story lodge with large front porch on right Washington Club Established in 1902 by twenty of Duluth's powerful business leaders, the Washington Club was a private sporting club, created with the intent of continuing "the breeding and propagation of brook trout, instruction and mutual improvement in the Art of Angling and the promotion of social culture among its members". young men sitting on front steps of large lodge building Park Place Resort/Rock Harbor Lodge On a less modest scale was Kneut Kneutson's resort. Circa 1900 Kneutson developed Park Place, (later renamed the Rock Harbor Lodge) on the southeastern end of Isle Royale in Rock Harbor. Kneutson purchased a block of land in what he named "Snug Harbor," and platted out streets and house lots. "With the help of his son, Kneutson built several small cottages, a central dining room, and cleared an area for tents. three story guest house alongside waterfront Belle Isle Resort In 1912, Fred Schofield set a new standard on Isle Royale when he opened the Belle Isle Resort. Schofield had co-owned the Tobin Harbor Resort for a short time, but wanted to start a new resort. By June 1912 he had built the main lodge and four cottages on Fish Island (now called Belle Isle), off Isle Royale's northeastern shore. resort with carved statue in front, sign with bold letters spelling name on roof Shaw/Smithwick Mine The Smithwick Mine was one of the earliest established on Isle Royale and is probably the one most often seen by visitors today. It was located in July 1843 by James Smithwick and worked by his agent, C. G. Shaw. sign noting location of Shaw-Smithwick mine site Johnson's Resort Although Rock Harbor, Belle Isle, Minong Lodge, and Singer's Island House resort on Washington Island were the main resorts which competed for Isle Royale's tourist trade, the tradition of fishermen offering lodging services continued into the 1930s. In the 1920s - 1930s, Chippewa Harbor fisherman Holger Johnson and his wife Lucy ran a resort called Johnson's Resort and Trading Post. people congregating around barrels in front of dockside store Pittsburg & Isle Royale Mining Company This company, incorporated in Pittsburg about 1846, began its mining activities in 1847 in the Todd Harbor area. In that year two log cabins and a blacksmith shop were erected, and nine men worked on a shaft near the shore. poor rock pile along lakeshore Ohio & Isle Royale Mining Company The Ohio and Isle Royale Company, like the Siskowit, was given permission by the Secretary of War to file on Isle Royale locations between Rock Harbor and Chippewa Harbor. A townsite named Ransom, after the Agent, Leander Ransom, was soon established. In 1847 forty or fifty men cleared land, built houses, planted a garden, and explored on the ridge north of the townsite for copper. rock remains of the Ransom townsite, surrounded by brush Minong Copper Company Near Minong Ridge in the McCargoe Cove area are hundreds of pits left by Indians who had mined for copper masses. These pits attracted the early attention of miners, and in 1874 three companies were formed in Detroit to exploit them-The Minong, the Cove, and the Ancient Mining companies. Excitement waxed in 1875 as substantial copper was harvested, one mass weighing 6,000 pounds, another of 3,500-4,000 pounds, and still another of 2,500-3,000 pounds. person climbing poor rock pile to the Siskowit Mine site Johns Hotel The Johns Hotel is the oldest surviving building representing the resort era on Isle Royale. It dates to the beginning of the recreation and resort movement when some entrepreneurs first began to exploit Isle Royale's recreational potential. The hotel's accommodations were rustic but consistent with its roots --a new commercial niche developed by an enterprising entrepreneur with connections to the commercial fishing industry. log hewn hotel structure with arched entryway Siskowit Mining Company This company went through a series of early changes, beginning as the Isle Royale Union Company in 1844, reorganizing as the Siskowit Mining Association in 1847, and becoming the Siskowit Mining Company in 1849. In its final form it was incorporated in Michigan, with directors from Washington, D.C., Wisconsin, and Philadelphia, and had Charles Whittlesey, an eminent geologist and business man, as agent. person climbing poor rock pile to the Siskowit Mine site Saginaw Mining Company The Saginaw Mining Company, apparently backed by Marquette capital, sent out a small work force in 1877 to mine an old location formerly prospected by the Ohio and Isle Royale Company. They sank two shafts with a winze connecting them and took out a limited amount of copper. But operations ceased after 1879. archaeologist looks on at flooded mine shaft Island Mining Company On the south side of the island an ambitious but short-lived operation grew up. S. W. Hill's party discovered a large number of Indian pits to the north of Siskiwit Bay. The Island Mining Company was organized in 1873, and that fall a force of 80 men reported for work on the island. With over 400,000 board feet of lumber shipped to the island, they laid out a townsite on the north side of Siskiwit Bay and built a road two miles to the mine. massive steam hoist engine sits in the forest Late Archaic Two cultural traditions germane to the prehistory of Isle Royale are recognized for the Archaic stage: the Shield Archaic and the "Old Copper Culture." Characteristics that distinguish these from the earlier Plano tradition include a more diversified material culture, a broader subsistence base, and larger populations. North Gap shoreline looking towards Ontario 19th Century Nineteenth-century documentation clearly indicates that an aboriginal population that included Ojibwa, Cree, and Assiniboin groups was present on the north shore of Lake Superior in the area of the "Great Carrying Place" (Grand Portage) and near the mouth of the Kaministiquia River at Fort William (present day Thunder Bay, Ontario). North Gap shoreline looking towards Ontario 16th and 17th Centuries Europeans became aware of Great Lakes region copper in the early sixteenth century when copper ornaments were found among the Indians along the St. Lawrence. In the winter of 1535-1536 Cartier was entertained and intrigued by tales of the "Kingdom of Saguenay" vaguely located to the north and west and from whence had come the copper objects in possession of his hosts, the St. Lawrence Iroquois. North Gap shoreline looking towards Ontario Terminal Woodland There is no sudden change in artifact style to mark the beginning of the Terminal Woodland substage. Instead it is defined in terms of the trends that set it apart from its antecedent. Terminal Woodland is characterized by increased localized cultural differentiation, measurable in increments of stylistic variability and raw material use. North Gap shoreline looking towards Ontario 18th Century Apart from proselytizing the faith, a perennial interest on the part of the French religious communities, the exploration of the Upper Country was strictly a means to an end - the discovery of the route that would open direct trade between Europe and Cathay and Japan. Eventually, the region came to be appreciated for its own qualities by Europeans and Euroamericans who sought to exploit its vast resources rather than merely use the land as a base for seeking a waterway. North Gap shoreline looking towards Ontario Historic The acquisition of European material culture preceded the arrival of the first whites, filtering through a down-the-line exchange network extending from the St. Lawrence River across the Great Lakes to the Mississippi valley. While there is no consensus regarding the extent and magnitude of sociocultural change brought on by contact and the fur trade, certain fundamental broad-scale shifts in native culture can be traced. North Gap shoreline looking towards Ontario Washington Island Fisheries Some of the earliest buildings on Washington Island were built by Sam and Andrew Sivertson, of Norwegian descent, who began fishing at Isle Royale in the early 1890s. Aside from potential Native American use or activities on Washington Island, the Sivertson's were the first commercial fishermen to operate at this location. Sivertson residence, fish house, and net house with barrels in front Johnson/Anderson Fishery Duluth fishermen Herman Johnson and John Anderson established a commercial fishing business at present day Belle Isle around 1890. Johnson and Anderson were squatting and never held title to the property. Eventually the land was purchased by Belle Isle Resort owner Fred Schofield. Believing he also held title to Johnson Island, Schofield granted the pair permission to relocate their operations across the harbor two fish houses on Johnson Island, door open on the left one, three boats tied out front Johns Brothers Fishery Captain John F. Johns was a miner, fisherman, and entrepreneur who established a small fishery on Washington Island in 1885, which employed several men. Around 1888, Johns acquired nearby Johns Island (formerly known as Johnson Island) and constructed a cottage as an intermittent dwelling and storage facility. aerial image of Johns Brothers Fishery in 1896 Initial Woodland The boundary between the Archaic and Woodland stages is archaeologically defined by the introduction of ceramic technology. In eastern North America south of the boreal forest the first ceramic-producing cultures are referred to as Early Woodland, dating as early as 1000 BC. North Gap shoreline looking towards Ontario Late Paleoindian and Early Archaic Although the prehistory of Isle Royale is known to have begun over 4,000 years ago, sites dating as early as 8000 B.P. dot the surrounding Lake Superior basin. Following the retreat of the last glaciation, prehistoric hunters found ample prey among the caribou, bison, elk, and moose in an environment then in transition from a periglacial tundra to the present southern boreal forest. North Gap shoreline looking towards Ontario SS George M. Cox: Operational History The SS Puritan served as a passenger steamer on Lake Michigan for most of its life, interrupted by a brief stint as a commissioned U.S. Navy ship in World War I. a crowd awaiting arrival of SS America in Tobin Harbor SS George M. Cox: Wreck Event and Survivor Accounts The first voyage of Puritan as the newly appointed George M. Cox was also to be its last. The SS George M. Cox bottomed out on the Rock of Ages reef, in close proximity to the lighthouse. SS George M. Cox, stuck on Rock of Ages reef, bow protruding into the air SS Kamloops: Construction KAMLOOPS was built in England by Furness Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. at its shipyard at Haverton Hill on Tees in 1924. Built for Steamships, Ltd. of Montreal, Canada for use in the Great Lakes package trade. view of the SS Kamloops' port side, substantial dock behind it SS Kamloops: Wreck Event The last trip of the 1927 season would be the SS Kamloops' final trip, before disappearing into the icy waters of Lake Superior, to be lost for decades. diagram of SS Kamloops on its side on the bottom of the lake SS Kamloops: Operational History After construction and delivery, KAMLOOPS spent the entire duration of its short life on the Great Lakes, sailing from 1924 to 1926. SS Kamloops underway with smoke billowing SS George M. Cox: Construction The steel passenger screw-steamer George M. Cox was named Puritan by its builder, the Craig Shipbuilding Co. of Toledo, Ohio in 1901. It was outfitted as an overnight passenger vessel for service on the Great Lakes. view of the SS Puritan being constructed on drydock in Toledo, OH SS Glenlyon: Operational History The SS Glenlyon was converted from a freight vessel to a passenger vessel, to service the Great Lakes for less than a year before being sold and converted back to a freight vessel. crew of the SS Glenlyon posing for a picture on the stern of the docked boat SS Monarch: Wreck Event and Survivor Accounts The final voyage of Monarch would have been its last trip of the 1906 season. It was not unusual for a Great Lakes vessel of this period to be lost on the last trip of the season. SS Monarch bow, stuck on the rocks of Isle Royale SS America: Wreck Event and Survivor Accounts The SS America sank on June 7, 1928. The only fatality was a dog. SS America sinking into North Gap SS America: Construction The SS America was built by the Booth Company in 1902 for operation as an excursion vessel. view of the starboard side of the SS America in black and white, smoke bellowing out SS America: Operational History The SS America sailed the Great Lakes from 1902 to 1928, primarily serving as the main vessel for transportation to and from Isle Royale. a crowd awaiting arrival of SS America in Tobin Harbor Rock Harbor Lighthouse The first to be built on Isle Royale, Rock Harbor Lighthouse marks the entrance to Rock Harbor at the Middle Islands Passage. In 1847 the location was chosen and preliminary survey work was completed. In 1853 Congress appropriated $5000 for construction. The lighthouse was completed and lit in 1855, utilizing a fixed white light visible for 14 miles. children in the front yard of an inhabited Rock Harbor Lighthouse Rock of Ages Lighthouse Situated five miles off the northwest tip of Isle Royale in Lake Superior, Rock of Ages Lighthouse stands as one of the tallest and most powerful beacons on the Great Lakes. first couple floors of the 117ft Rock of Ages lighthouse being completed during construction 19th Century Copper Mining The presence of copper on Isle Royale was a matter of common knowledge by 1843, with information ranging from Jesuit accounts and tales of American Fur Company fishermen to formal geological reports. To this impetus could be added the boom spirit of the time, an abundance of venture capital, and a highly unrealistic estimate of the ease by which fortunes could be acquired through copper mining. 6,000 pound mass of copper, harvested in the 19th century, hammered by the ancients Isle Royale Land Corporation During the last years of mineral exploration on the island, the lsle Royale Land Corporation bought 84,000 acres of land at the western end of the island. Realizing their charter only gave them the right to search for minerals, not to mine them, they set up a subsidiary firm, the Wendigo Copper Company. In 1890, this new company was given 5,000 acres of land on the western end of Isle Royale. Their purpose was to search for and mine copper. multi story mine company building as photographed in 1892 SS Cumberland: Construction The side-wheeler CUMBERLAND was built in 1871 at Port Robinson, Ontario, by Melanchthon Simpson for Charles Perry and Co. drydock view with people gathered around of the SS Manitoba, sister ship to the SS Cumberland SS Cumberland: Operational History The SS Cumberland sailed the Great Lakes from 1871 to 1876, to provide passenger and package service on the lakes during its relatively short lifespan. view of the SS Cumberland docked with large building behind it SS Emperor: Construction When the steel bulk freighter EMPEROR was launched on December 17, 1910, it was the largest ship ever built in Canada. an early view of the SS Emperor under power, painted in a dark color scheme SS Cumberland: Wreck Event The SS Cumberland struck the Rock of Ages reef on July 25, 1877. boiler of the SS Cumberland sitting on lake bottom SS Emperor: Operational History The SS Emperor suffered from a few different mishaps during its years of service, including an event where it had to dump 900 tons of ore after bottoming out near the Straits of Mackinac. a crowd awaiting arrival of SS America in Tobin Harbor SS Emperor: Wreck Event and Survivor Accounts SS Emperor struck Canoe Rocks shortly before 4:15 am. According to various accounts, the ship stayed afloat from 20 to 35 minutes. bridge and mast of SS Emperor still visible above water after wreck at Canoe Rocks SS Glenlyon: Construction SS William H. Gratwick was built to serve as a package freighter for John Mitchell & Company of Cleveland. The hull was of steel with a length of 328 feet, a beam of 42.5 feet and a depth of 20.5 feet. Gross tonnage of the vessel was 2,818.27 and the net was 2,202.90. steamship covered in ice and snow at Duluth SS Glenlyon: Wreck Event and Survivor Accounts At about 1 am on November 1, 1924, SS Glenlyon reached the entrance of Siskiwit Bay. While entering, the vessel ran hard aground on a submerged reef off Menagerie Island. Most of the ship's remains today are widely diffused in the waters near Isle Royale Lighthouse. engine of the SS Glenlyon SS Monarch: Construction Monarch was built in Sarnia, Ontario on the St. Clair River in 1890. The vessel was constructed for extended season service on Lake Superior and was strongly reinforced with iron. SS Monarch docked with many people on the bow and gazing from the dock SS Monarch: Operational History The normal route for Monarch and running mate United Empire was from Sarnia, Ontario on Lake Huron, through Sault Ste. Marie to Fort William in Thunder Bay, Ontario, and to Duluth, Minnesota. Passengers and package freight were carried both ways. crew on deck of the SS Monarch SS Algoma: Operational History The SS Algoma carried passengers on the Great Lakes from 1884 to 1885. the SS Algoma is covered in a thick layer of ice from bow to stern SS Algoma: Wreck Event and Survivor Accounts The SS ALGOMA crashed into the rocky shoreline of Mott Island before being swept further out into the lake and violently filling with water. The wreck remains the highest fatality disaster on Lake Superior in recorded history. only a small fraction of the SS Algoma remained to sink into Lake Superior SS Algoma: Construction The SS Algoma was built by Aitken and Mansel of Glasgow, Scotland and had two sister ships that were identical to it and owned by the same lines, the SS Athabasca, and the SS Alberta. SS Algoma docked at Port Arthur with large building behind it SS Henry Chisholm: Construction Henry Chisholm was built in Cleveland by the firm Thomas Quayle's Sons, under the direction of master carpenter John Drackett. SS Henry Chisholm docked in Duluth, MN SS Henry Chisholm: Operational History During Henry Chisholm's operational life it was involved in many accidents, some minor, some serious, which was not unusual for bulk freighters of the period. pastel painting of the SS Henry Chisholm sailing turbulent seas on a dark moonlit night SS Henry Chisholm: Wreck Event The SS Henry Chisholm wrecked on October 20, 1898. underwater view of SS Henry Chisholm engine SS Chester A. Congdon: Construction CHESTER A. CONGDON was built as SALT LAKE CITY for the Holmes Steamship Company of Cleveland, then managed by W.A. Hawgood. early image of the SS SALT LAKE CITY with 'Salt Lake City' flag flying atop wheelhouse SS Chester A. Congdon: Operational History The SS Salt Lake City, renamed the SS Chester A. Congdon in 1912, served the Great Lakes as a bulk freighter, transporting grains and other materials. SS Chester A. Congdon arriving in port, lamps lighting the dock on the left and person looking on SS Chester A. Congdon: Wreck Event and Survivor Accounts The SS Chester A. Congdon ran aground on Canoe Rocks on November 6, 1918. The wreck resulted in one of the largest financial losses that has ever been dealt by the Great Lakes. SS America sinking into North Gap Isle Royale Lighthouse The second copper mining boom on Isle Royale began in 1873, once again bringing ships into Isle Royale's rocky harbors. This wave of mining ventures incited the creation of the island's second lighthouse, the Isle Royale Lighthouse. lighthouse and outbuildings on rocky Menagerie Island Archaeological History of Isle Royale and Ancient Copper Mining Isle Royale's prehistoric record began about 4,500 years ago, in the Archaic stage, which continued up to around 100 BCE when pottery was introduced. It was during the Archaic stage that copper mining and working began in earnest, although associated artifacts and habitation sites are only now being identified. hammerstones atop a pile of spent rock at McCargoe's Cove Resorts History By 1890, two new forces made themselves felt in the socio-economic development of Isle Royale. One was the realization, by the large companies that owned the island, that copper mining was not a paying business. This led to the search for other forms of revenue. Out of this mixture of economic and aesthetic-recreational values came the search for summer homes and the rise of commercial resorts. construction of the Rock Harbor Lodge Mattson's/Tobin's Harbor Resort/Minong Lodge By 1900, Gus Mattson, who had a fishing station in Tobin Harbor was renting rooms to sportsmen, while his wife cooked meals. He was one of several in the fishing industry who saw a further business opportunity in recreation and tourism. Mattson owned boats he could rent for fishing or sightseeing. small watercraft docked in front of waterside resort Passage Island Lighthouse The most important of Isle Royale's light stations is Passage Island. Marking the narrow passage between Isle Royale's Blake Point and Passage Island, the light primarily guides Canadian ships traveling between Sault Saint Marie, Michigan, and Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. visitors in front of the Passage Island lighthouse A Tale of Backcountry Paddling What is an Isle Royale wilderness experience like? Jump in the canoe and explore. Bull moose eating in forest. Voyage of Mammals Many common mammals found along the shores of Lake Superior are absent from Isle Royale. Why would this be? Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Wildland Fire Additional Resources Glossary of commonly used fire terms and links for more information about wildland fire at Isle Royale National Park and throughout the park service. prescribed fire at Glacier National Park Managing Fire on Isle Royale Isle Royale maintains a Fire Management Plan (FMP) that includes procedures for various types of fire including nature caused fires, prescribed fires, and human caused fires. prescribed fire at Glacier National Park Benefits of Fire on Isle Royale Wildland and structural fires are managed at Isle Royale National Park by a comprehensive and strategic plan. NPS firefighters training on a structural fire at Yosemite National Park. History of Wildland Fire on Isle Royale By recorded history, the most substantial fire to beset Isle Royale occurred in the year of 1936, the first year that the federal government had control of the archipelago in commencing the Isle Royale National Park Project. Approximately one-quarter of the land area of the island was burned. Observer surveying the fire exposed roots of a balsam fir after major 1936 wildfire. CCC Years at Isle Royale: 1935 to 1941 From 1935 to 1941, the Civilian Conservation Corps played a vital role in preparing Isle Royale for its destiny as a national park, creating or revitalizing all of the necessary island infrastructure necessary for the park to exist. Yet in addition to its intended mission, the CCC at Isle Royale are remembered for their heroic role in fighting the fire of 1936, a blaze that remains the largest and most destructive on record. the charred remains of Isle Royale forests subsequent to the 1936 blaze Fire Towers on Isle Royale Though no longer actively used for fire detection, Isle Royale has had three vantage points from which to command a broad sweep of the island. The primary utilization of these towers is for communication purposes in the present. historic photo of Mount Ojibway fire tower Predator-Prey Relationships on Isle Royale The isolated island of Isle Royale National Park presents a unique opportunity to study the interconnected predator-prey relationships between wolves, moose, and beaver. View of a wolf's head with an open mouth. Patterns of Pathogen Exposure in Gray Wolves Read the abstract and link to a new published article on wolf pathogens across North America: Brandell, E. E., P. C. Cross, M. E. Craft, D. W. Smith, E. J. Dubovi, ...B. L. Borg, M. Sorum, ... et al. 2021. Patterns and processes of pathogen exposure in gray wolves across North America. Scientific Reports 11: 3722. Aerial view of a wolf pack in the snow. Why Relocate Wolves to Isle Royale? Why were wolves relocated to Isle Royale National Park? A gray wolf stands in the snow during the winter at Isle Royale National Park. Park Partners in Wolf Relocation to Isle Royale The wolf relocation project was possible because of Isle Royale's partnering organizations. Wolf Biotechs collect samples of wolf scat at Isle Royale National Park. Isle Royale Wolf Relocation Between Fall 2018 and Winter 2019 nineteen wolves were captured in the Great Lakes Region and relocated to Isle Royale. Gray wolf exits cage after being relocated to Isle Royale. Heritage of Minong Minong and the waters immediately surrounding the archipelago are a significant part of the North Shore Ojibwe's traditional cultural history and were part of the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippwa's (Ojibwe) ancestral land. For the Grand Portage Band, it is a traditional cultural property where they connect and practice their traditional heritage that has included hunting and trapping, maple sugaring, fishing, plant gathering, and spiritual practice. hammerstones atop a pile of spent rock at McCargoe's Cove Invasive Mussels at Apostle Islands: They're Hardier than You Thought Lake Superior was once thought to be inhospitable to zebra and quagga mussels because of it’s cold water and low calcium levels, yet they have been found in the waters of Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in recent investigations. What is the National Park Service doing, and what can you do to help? A map of the western end of Lake Superior, including Apostle Islands National Lakeshore
Your Guide to Isle Royale National Park www.nps.gov/isro National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Minong, the Good Place Not a day goes by that I don’t look to the east from Grand Portage, my eyes searching for the familiar low outline on the horizon; and wonder how soon before I am able to visit yet again. Named Minong, or “the good place” by our Ojibway ancestors, this vast cluster of islands continues to be a part of our cultural heritage The sinew that binds us all to Minong is a deep respect and gratitude for this remarkable environment. With the acknowledgment in 2019 of Isle Royale as a Traditional Cultural Property of the Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, and listing on the National Register of Historic Places, the islands now loom much closer than the actual sixteen nautical miles from our northern shore. This designation becomes tinder for our imaginations; beckoning us to connect with the past and to craft new relationships with those who are its current keepers. Through thousands and thousands of years it has always been hard to get to Minong. For our ancestors, land rich in resources offered the promise of copper, food, and medicine which outweighed any hardship. Today’s visitors seek other rewards. Whether you arrive by water, air, or as did my greatgrandfather, by dogsled over a frozen bridge of ice, the feeling upon landing remains much the same. Whether new acquaintance or old friend, “The Good Place” embraces you and invites you in. Rick Anderson Grand Portage Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Welcome to Isle Royale National Park A dear friend of mine had a theory about National Park Service employees. He believed that they imprint on the place they most closely identify with— oftentimes their "first" park. Much like first love, he’d say, in terms of depth of feeling and passion. While that was certainly true for him, I have had a series of loving relationships with the amazing places where I have been privileged to live and work. Last fall I began my acquaintance with “the island” and I am excited to deepen that rapport. As I write, it has been snowing here on the Keweenaw Peninsula for days. When not working or skiing, I am preparing for the summer season and for moving to the island. Winter nights offer plenty of time to pore over maps and routes and read stories of island life. Boats, paddles, and life jackets have been bought; our fishing poles found. Here’s to a wonderful new relationship with Minong! Whether you are a first-time visitor or have generational ties to the island, I look forward to learning about your connections to this special place as I continue to develop my own. Denice Swanke, Superintendent Printing courtesy of Isle Royale and Keweenaw Parks Association. Treasured Island............................................2-3 Paddling, Diving, Fishing.................................9 Know Before You Go.........................................4 Visitor Centers, Programs, Lodging...............10 Printed by Christensen Printing & Publishing on recycled paper using agri-based inks. Protect Your Park..............................................5 Transportation...............................................11 Map, Campgrounds, Trails............................6-7 Contacts, Fees, Park Store..............................12 Please recycle. Camping, Boating..............................................8 Treasured Island One of the privileges of being an Isle Royale ranger is greeting the familiar faces of returning visitors. The island has an intimacy that holds people close. A first visit is rarely a last. For some, like these island devotees, Isle Royale’s landscape and waterscape soak into their identity. Share in their stories and deepen your connections to place. Maintaining Memories From the time before I could walk Isle Royale has been a part of my life. My father was raised there. My grandfather was raised there. My great-grandfather and greatgrandmother immigrated from Norway to commercially fish on the island. During my childhood, my father worked in Duluth and every summer he would pack my mother, my sisters and myself into Picnic—our family boat. We would spend a month traveling around the island: camping and visiting friends at Crystal Cove, Edisen Fishery, Fisherman’s Home, and with family in Washington Harbor. Some of the best days of my life have been spent cruising in Picnic. Picnic is a 24-foot open wooden boat built in 1949. In 1980 my dad stepped through the bottom of Picnic…and passed it down to me. Little did I know what a learning process owning a wood boat would be. In past years, I have assisted the park by restoring other old boats from around the island. While working on these boats, I felt connected to those who sailed them—in treacherous rough waters and on glorious calm seas. Restoring vessels preserves these memories for others to experience. Picnic will be ready this summer to return to the island. Once ag
Isle Royale National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Isle Royale National Park Passage Island Lighthouse Rock Harbor Area Guide Nor e de Th alisa P Isle Royale Lake Superior s Blake Point in Po ke c o t Merritt Lane ok ou Hidden Lake 1. 4 er ng Fi y e a v Fi B r 0.5 Th ree M ’s zy Su ave C ile in Tookers Island St ol or em lM il ra lT ia 0 1.2 2 2.0 Mt. Franklin 1. Gr ee n st on e 2.4 1. Ri dg e 1. 8 Tr a il 3. 4 0. 7 0. 5 To b D un ca n To Lookout Louise Raspberry Island Lane Cove H Ba ar y bo Lake Superior Scoville Point Scoville Point Lo Duncan Narrows tL ou is e L th 8 0. Seaplane Dock Mott Island Park Headquarters 3. 7 4. ve Ca Rock Harbor Lodge Rock Harbor Visitor Center Caribou Island Daisy Farm Rock Harbor Lighthouse n ise y Edsher Fi 0 21 9/ 20 6 20 5/ 20 Seaplane Dock 21 Smithwick Mine 6 21 5/ 21 20 1/ 20 Hiking Trails Ampitheater Interpretive Trail Paved Walks in Tob rbo Ha Visitor Center Tower Scenic Overlook Visitor Center Restrooms Showers Laundry Rock Harbor Campground il ra lT t ia in or Po em ille l M ov ol Sc St to ail r Tr Campgrounds Chippewa Harbor 3 21 2 Tobin Harbor 4 1 /2 St ol to l Me Sc m ov or ill ial e P Tr oi ail nt Legend 20 3/ 20 4 Moskey Ba s i n 0 22 9/ 20 7/ 20 8 Rock Harbor Saginaw Point /2 12 Trail ’s 18 y wa zy 21 7/ 2 1.9 Daisy Fa rm jib rail yT 7 wa 1. Ojib L O e ak 2 Mt 5 1. To Su 21 1 Mt. Ojibway Tower Store r rbo Ha ck il Ro Tra Tra Spruces First Aid Station sh Auditorium Ojibway 61-75 Restrooms Nokomis 41-55 Fuel Dock Boat Rentals Fish Cleaning Station Snug Harbor Restaurant Snack Bar Gift Shop rail nT Guest House Lodge Office tso eu Kn Lake Superior Saginaw 21-35 Chippewa 1-15 Buildings Docks N Walking Trails Paved Paths Welcome to Wilderness 0 50 100 Scale in Feet America Dock Enter the quiet of the boreal forest and wander beneath spruce and fir trees draped with tangles of Old Man’s Beard. Perch on a rock and experience Lake Superior’s moods which shape and change this area’s rugged shoreline. Listen for the cry of the loon, luring you deeper into this isolated Island wilderness. Explore… The northeastern end of Isle Royale National Park offers a variety of activities designed to enhance your park experience. Drop by the Rock Harbor Visitor Center to: view displays, browse publications, receive your backcountry permit, check the interpretive program schedule, or have your questions answered. To aid in your explorations, the Rock Harbor Lodge offers boat, canoe, and kayak rentals, as well as sightseeing tours. Short Trips Scoville Point 4.2 mile loop This trail winds its way between the forest and shoreline communities out to spectacular Scoville Point. The contrast between the intimacy and protection of the woods and the powerful influence of Lake Superior is dramatic, especially on a stormy day. Hike all or part of this figure eight loop to experience the interplay of land and water. Interpretive signs along the Stoll Memorial section (1.8 miles) offer insight into these processes and their effect on the Island’s history. Mount Franklin 10 mile roundtrip To reach this scenic overlook honoring Benjamin Franklin, take either the Rock Harbor Trail or Tobin Harbor Trail until they meet the wooden post which directs you to the Mount Franklin Trail. Then begin your ascent of Mount Franklin, a high point on the Greenstone Ridge. From this breathtaking overlook, view the Island’s interior and north shore, as well as the distant Canadian mainland. Bring along a day pack including lunch, a day’s supply of water, and rain gear on this all day hike through the Island’s Wilderness. Canoe or Boat Further Afield Lookout Louise 2 mile roundtrip A 20 minute paddle or water taxi ride will put you at the start of the Lookout Louise Trail, which leads hikers to a magnificent overlook. The trail winds its way past Hidden Lake, a small pond with a natural mineral spring which is a lure for moose; and then begins the climb upward. Halfway up the ridge, Monument Rock looms over the trail. This inland sea stack was carved by wave action thousands of years ago when lake levels were significantly higher than today. Traverse higher to the overlook and be rewarded by a superb vista of the north side of Isle Royale and the Ontario mainland. Adventurous people equipped with a day’s supply of water, rain gear, and snacks may choose to hike the 9.4 miles back to Rock Harbor via the Greenstone Ridge, Mount Franklin, and Tobin Harbor Trails. Edisen Fishery and Rock Harbor Lighthouse Step back in time at the historic Edisen Fishery located across the harbor from Daisy Farm. Named for commercial fishers Pete and Laura Edisen, this friendly couple’s restored fishery tells the story of this once booming industry. After exploring the fishery, walk the quarter-mile to the Rock Harbor Lighthouse, built in 1855 to guide ships safely
Isle Royale National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Isle Royale National Park Windigo Area Guide A Portal to Wilderness A warm breeze blows through the maples and birches, a splash echoes across the water as a cow moose wades into the protected harbor, an osprey circles overhead. This is the edge of Wilderness. Welcome… A Community Carved from the Wild Step one hundred years into the past and imagine living in this isolated outpost year round. A community of 135 worked and played on the island’s west end; although the forest has grown and hidden much of the evidence, a discerning eye may discover remnants of the people who once lived here. The Wendigo Mining Company operated from their headquarters, which was located just behind the Windigo Visitor Center, from 1890-1892. Workers and their families braved the isolation and long winter months in hopes that a workable deposit of copper would be found - it never was. After these few brief years this Members Only If you wanted to visit Windigo in the early 1900s, you needed to carry a membership card! The Washington Club, a group of Duluth businessmen, used this area as a private retreat. They relaxed in their club house, the former headquarters for the mining company; and tried their luck hunting caribou and other game. They A Guiding Beacon Captains navigating the western passage around Isle Royale must have breathed a sigh of relief after passing the warning light of the Rock of Ages Lighthouse, a double flash every ten seconds that could be seen for almost 20 miles. bustling mining company port and the small settlement of Wendigo fell silent, ending the last attempt to mine copper from Isle Royale. The network of old mining roadways stretching between Huginnin Cove and Lake Desor now serve as pathways into Isle Royale’s Wilderness. As you follow these trails, you walk in the footprints of those who came before. Look carefully, rusty nails, rotted timbers and broken clay pipes all have stories to tell: stories of those who called this place “home” in a time not so long ago. even had white-tailed deer imported to the island! The deer and caribou are gone and so is the club. Only the building’s foundation, beside the present day Windigo store, remains. Among the most remote life stations on the continent, the light was “home” to keepers who lived there for months at a time, protecting vessels from the dangers of the surrounding shallow reef. The light’s second-order Fresnel lens was the largest sized lens used on the Great Lakes. View this magnificent lens at the Windigo Visitor Center. It was relocated to Windigo in 1985 when the Coast Guard installed a new battery-powered solar beacon. No Moose Allowed! Isle Royale supports a large population of moose. In 1995 an amazing 2400 moose were estimated to be on the Island! Near the Windigo Store, you can witness the effect that these large herbivores have on the Island’s vegetation. A fenced-in exclosure, installed in 1979, was designed to keep moose out. The difference between the “moose-free” exclosure and the surrounding forest landscape is dramatic. While current populations of moose are smaller, they still continue to have enormous impact on the Island. Windigo Area North Minong Ridge Overlook 3 Miles One Way Huginnin Cove 9.4 Mile Loop Huginnin Cove ong Min 3.1 Trail West Huginnin Cove McGinty Cove 3.3 Huginnin Cove Campground East Huginnin Cove Trail Lake Superior Windigo to North Desor Campground 12.9 Miles e Ridg Trail eek n Cr ngto hi Was 6 0. 6 0. Beaver Island Beaver Island Campground ton hing Was bor Windigo to Feldtmann Lake 8.5 Miles Windigo to Island Mine Campground 6.9 Miles Moose Exclosure Self-Guided Nature Trail 1.2 Mile Loop il ra eT ak L n ldt Fe n ree Windigo Feldtmann Lake Trail Windigo to Overlook 1.8 Miles One Way Har il Tra G 0.3 SeaPlane Landing Area e idg eR n sto 0.3 Washington Creek Campground n ma Grace Creek Overlook Grace Creek Gas Campground (Individual Only) Visitor Center Campground (Individual & Group) Store Trail Overlook Dock 0 1/2 0 1 Mile 1 Kilometer Discoveries Await The southwestern end of Isle Royale National Park offers a variety of activities designed to enhance your park experience. Drop by the Windigo Visitor Center to view displays, browse publications, receive your backcountry permit, check the interpretive program schedule, or have your questions answered. Explore the trails, relax on the deck of the Windigo Store or take a dip in the often chilly, but refreshing waters of Washington Harbor. Short Trips Grace Creek Overlook 3.6 mile roundtrip This scenic trail skirts the Washington Harbor shoreline through the boreal forest, thick with lichens, and then cuts inland. As the trail climbs higher, forests of mature hardwoods give way to an open ridge top. Follow the ridge then turn on the small spur trail leading to a rocky outcropping for a view of the Island’s interior and Lake S

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