James A Garfield

National Historic Site - Ohio

James A. Garfield National Historic Site is located in Mentor, Ohio. The site preserves the Lawnfield estate and surrounding property of James Abram Garfield, the 20th President of the United States, and includes the first presidential library established in the United States.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/jaga/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_A._Garfield_National_Historic_Site James A. Garfield National Historic Site is located in Mentor, Ohio. The site preserves the Lawnfield estate and surrounding property of James Abram Garfield, the 20th President of the United States, and includes the first presidential library established in the United States. A front porch can serve many purposes. For some, it is a place to enjoy the breeze on a warm summer night. For others, a perch from which to keep eyes on what's happening in their neighborhood. In 1880, James Garfield used his front porch as a platform to greet thousands of well-wishers during his presidential campaign. Today, the porch serves as a gateway to the story of the Garfield family. From Interstate 90 - exit at Route 306 and head north to Route 20. East on Route 20 about 1.5 miles. Site is on north side of Mentor Avenue. From Route 2 - exit at Route 306 and head south to Route 20. East on Route 20 about 1.5 miles. Site is on the north side of Mentor Avenue. James A. Garfield National Historic Site Visitor Center In 1893, Lucretia Garfield constructed a Carriage House and Horse Barn behind the Garfield Home. In 1998, the same building was opened as the Visitor Center at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. Inside visitors can find the site's 18-minute film as well exhibits in chronological order of the president's life. Tickets for the tour of the president's home can be purchased at the Visitor Center front desk. James A. Garfield National Historic Site is located at 8095 Mentor Avenue Mentor, Ohio 44060. For directions please visit the web address below. The Front Porch, Garfield Home Front porch of Garfield home showing red front door The front porch of James Garfield's home was the scene of the first front porch campaign. The presidential candidate gave patriotic speeches and met with thousands of people who came to which him well during the summer and fall of 1880. Carriage House Carriage House entrance from the south The Carriage House, built in 1894, was repurposed by the National Park Service to become a modern visitor center. It was part of a $12.5 million restoration in the 1990's. Visitor Center, Main Entrance Visitor Center main entrance off the parking lot. A friendly greeting awaits visitors who enter the Visitor Center. This historic building, constructed in 1894, serves as bookstore, exhibit gallery and auditorium where the park film is shown. Tickets for tours of the Garfield home are also available her James A. Garfield National Historic Site a large gray house with a red roof Thousands to visitors came to this front porch to hear presidential candidate James A. Garfield speak in 1880. Library addition, north side A view of the memorial library addition through the trees. Mrs. Garfield constructed a beautiful addition to the Garfield home following the President's assassination in 1881. These 9 rooms contain the first Presidential Memorial Library, including the a fireproof vault which once contained Garfield's papers. Hand-painted Fireplace Tile, Garfield Dining Room Hand-painted tile shows a bird next with blue eggs Mrs. Garfield was known for her artistic talent, which softly blankets the interior of the Garfield home. In particular, the dining room boasts two tiles which were hand-painted by Mrs. Garfield, surround by others done by her children. The Remarkable Roscoe, Part II Part 2 of The Remarkable Roscoe Conkling article. bronze statue of a man standing on pedestal The Remarkable Roscoe: Friend and Nemesis of Presidents (Part I) Roscoe Conkling was a senator from New York and one of Congressman and president-elect Garfield's biggest adversaries. Learn more about the man who led the Stalwart faction of the Republican Party. a bronze statue of a man standing on a pedestal The Remarkable Roscoe, Part III Part 3 and conclusion to the Remarkable Roscoe. bronze statue of a man standing on pedestal Defining The Victorians What made the Victorian era (1837-1901) so unique? Money. Empowerment. Status. Take a good look at the Garfield home. What do you think Lucretia may have had to communicate to her visitors that she was an educated woman of status? A Snuggery for the General President-elect Garfield met with supporters, wrote letters and speeches, and welcomed friends in his small private office during his campaign in 1880. Find out more about this room and what took place here. a sketch of the Snuggery shows five men conversing with each other A Fickle Current A young James A. Garfield left home to become a sailor. He worked on the Ohio and Erie Canal for awhile before returning home and attending school. Read about his experience here and learn about our upcoming podcast! a young Garfield wearing a jacket Caroline Ransom: Artistic Endeavors on the Western Reserve Inside the Garfield home there are many paintings that were done by Ohio artist Caroline Ransom, which includes the painting to the left the Garfield's youngest child Edward "Neddy" who died as an infant. This article will give readers a look into her life, her training, and some of the paintings inside the Garfield home at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. a little boy who is dressed in a white outfit wearing a straw hat with a blue ribbon around hat The Trial of the Assassin Guiteau Charles Guiteau assassinated President Garfield in 1881. Read this article about his trial and convinction! man wearing a suit standing to the left of a chair with right arm laying on the back of the chair April Fools: Foolish Presidential Cartoon Depictions April 1st is commonly celebrated as ‘April Fools’ Day’ in the United States, and elsewhere in the world. Nowadays, April Fools’ Day is relatively tame and rarely makes an individual the butt of a joke. Instead, one of the more April 1st pranks is for newspapers to publish a false news story. Learn more about Political cartoons became part of this foolish trend! Political cartoon that shows 1880 presidential candidates at ballerinas Coburn and Barnum: Creating A Presidential Library Learn all about the architects of Lucretia Garfield's Presidential Memorial Library in the Garfield home, and their role in the architecture of the greater Cleveland area. Sketch of Forrest A. Coburn Inauguration Day On March 4, 1881 James A. Garfield took the oath of office and was sworn in as the 20th President of the United States, learn more about this history of the inauguration in this article. James A. Garfield in front of a large crowd for his inauguration in Washington D.C. Garfield Meets Another Academic Yung Wing was a contemporary of James A. Garfield. He was honored by a dinner in 1880 which Garfield attended. Wing was a student at Yale University graduating in 1854. Find out more about Yung Wing and his similarities to President James A. Garfield. a young drawing of Yung Wing Lucretia’s Holiday Gone Wrong Traveling to New Jersey visit his wife, President James A. Garfield was shot by an assassin on July 2, 1881. This article will share the thoughts and feelings of First Lady Lucretia Garfield on her husband's shooting. a black and white portrait of First Lady Garfield DIGESTIVE DILEMAS in the Victorian Era My Jolly Friends Secret written by Dr. Dio Lewis can be found in the library at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. Read the article to learn more about the book and the author who wrote it! a amn with a long white beard is posing for a picture and facing to the left The Bard and the President The Cleveland Shakespeare Festival will be performing "Henry V". Find out more about the performance and President Garfield's connection to William Shakespeare! Says The Cleveland Shakespeare Festival Victorian Thanksgiving Traditions Thanksgiving has become a family tradition for many. President Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1863. Read this article to learn more the reason behind this holiday. picture says Thanksgiving Greetings with a little boy looking at a turkey You Need Your Head Examined! Phrenology, the examination of a person’s skull shape was a popular belief in President Garfield's lifetime. Learn more about the subject and what he thought of it. Phrenology chart A Century of Dishonor by Helen Hunt Jackson Read about one of the books that can be found in the library at James A. Garfield National Historic Site by author Helen Hunt Jackson whom shared a mutual acquaintance, Emily Dickinson, with First Lady Lucretia Rudolph. The book was a gift to the newly elected president in January 1881. a red book with the title A Century of Dishonor by Helen Hunt Jackson PICTURED BY THEIR CHILDREN: President Garfield, by his Daughter Mary Garfield Stanley-Brown Mollie (Mary) honored her father, President James A. Garfield, in an article written for the magazine, The Youth's Companion, in 1893. Read excerpts from the article here. A colorful picture of the magazine cover of Youth's Companion The Homes of the Garfield Children: Eastlawn Eastlawn was home to Harry Garfield, son of the President and his wife, and his family. The home was part of the country estate that First Lady Garfield planned. Learn more about the home here! white stone that was a cornerstone to Eastlawn that reads Revolutionary War Garfields Lexington and Concord was the first battle of the American Revolutionary War. Find out how an ancestor of President Garfield was involved in the battle. picture showing soldiers in the battle of Lexington and Concord A Private Chapter of the War, Part I First Lieutenant George W. Bailey wrote a book about his time in the Civil War where he was taken prisoner and sent to Andersonville Prison Camp in Georgia. The book acts as a diary where enters thoughts and activities on a day to day basis. He sent a copy of that book to President James A. Garfield in 1881. Today it is in the Memorial Library. Part 2 is also available. a brown book titled A Private Chapter in the War A Private Chapter of the War, Part II Bailey escaped Andersonville to a plantation in Georgia that is owned by a Confederate soldier. This article will share the conclusion of his journey back north during the same time as Ohioan William T Sherman is making his famous March to the Sea. a brown book titled A Private Chapter in the War Victorians and Women's Suffrage June is the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment. This article will look into the Victorian era and the women who fought for freedom. a drawing of two women holding up sign Garfield and Wilder Laura Ingalls Wilder was an author who wrote, Little House on the Prairie. Read how she and President Garfield are related! a young lady in a black and white picture wearing a dress Learning to Write John M. Washington and Wallace Turnage both escaped from slavery during the Civil War. In 2007, their memoirs were found and a book, A Slave No More by David Blight was written. A Slave No More book by David W. Blight How Might the 1880 Election Have Gone Differently? In 1880, newly elected President of the United States, James A. Garfield won by a narrow margin. What if the results would have had General Winfiled Scott Hancock? Can you image how our world would have been different? This article will delve into what may have been if Garfield was not elected. on the left is President Garfield and on the right is Vice President Chester A. Arthur An 1880 “October Surprise” What is an "October Surprise"? It is defined as a news event deliberately created or timed or sometimes occurring spontaneously to influence the outcome of an election. Such an event occcurred during the presidential campign of 1880. Find more about the event and candidate Garfield's response. banner- on top: Garfield and Arthur, on bottom-Hancock and English Political Satire and the 1880 Presidential Campaign Politicians vs. the Media has not changed much from the presidental campaign in 1880 to today. Learn more about the campaign and how the newspapers portrayed each candidate even family members. picture of President James A. Garfield John Rudolph: The Forgotten Son John Rudolph was brother to First Lady Lucretia Rudolph Garfield. This article will explore his military career where he was a member of the 42 Ohio Volunteer Infantry like his brother-in-law and future president James A. Garfield. photo of a young man wearing a suit jacket and bow tie Did Garfield Know Darwin or Twain? Did James A. Garfield know either Mark Twain or Charles Darwin? Find out here! man wearing a suit has dark hair and a dark beard The President James A. Garfield Death Mask It was common in the Victorian era to get a cast of a deceased persons face. President James A. Garfield's death mask and hand are on display at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. Learn more here! bronze cast of President Garfield's hand and face James A. Garfield and “Rain Follows the Plow” In his 49 years of life James A. Garfield had many jobs, hobbies, and interests. This article will explore his interest and hobby of agriculture. painting of James A. Garfield Candidate James A. Garfield's Neighbor E.T.C. Aldrich E.T.C. Aldrich and his daughter Mary (right) were neighbors of the Garfield family during the 1880 Presidential Campaign. Aldrich kept a diary during that time and this article will shed light on the events in the dairy. man with a goatee on the left and woman with white hair and gray dress on the right 1880 “Front Porch” Campaign Speeches Before 1880 it was not common for a candidate to give speeches to public on his own behalf. Learn more about why this changed during Garfield's campaign season and where he gave his speeches. blended together. Left the Garfield Home. Right is black and white of a group of people standing “If Any Outsider is Taken, I Hope it Will be Garfield”: The 1880 Republican Convention Many visitors who come to the site call President Garfield the "What If President". If he had lived how would the country have been changed during and after his presidency? This article delves into the scenario of what if Garfield had not been elected and someone else was. a caricature of Garfield Visit From Professor Cassius Marcellus Clay Zedaker During the campaign of 1880 James A. Garfield saw about 17,000 visitors at his Mentor farm, many of which were newspaper reporters. One unique visitor was Professor Zedaker a poet of sorts. Read more about the poet's visit to Mentor in August 1880. front page of a book titled Book of Poetry Eliza Ballou Garfield "Grandma Garfield" Learn more about the mother of the 20th President James A. Garfield, Eliza Ballou Garfield during the campaign season in 1880. a sketch of the balcony Garfield was sworn into officeon. Voting by Mail During a National Crisis In 1864, President Lincoln was running for a second term against Democratic candidate, General George McClellan. With many of the soldiers still on the battlefield how did they vote for their candidate? Learn more about absentee voting during the Civl War here! President Lincoln (left) and General McClellan (right) The Fisk Jubilee Singers The Fisk Jubilee Singers performed here at the Garfield Home during the campaign season. Learn more about the African American students from Tennessee who performed for the president elect, James A. Garfiield. The Round Robin Letter How did people communicate with each other before texting? They used a telegraph machine. Learn about election evening in 1880 when the two oldest boys were away at school in Massachusetts and how they communicated with their family here in Mentor, Ohio. table with a white table cloth, chairs surrounding the tableand the room has stain glass windows The Absent Ones Hal and James R. Garfield (picture left) were at school in New Hampshire at St. Paul's in 1880 when their father was campaigning at their Mentor farm. Read how the boys experienced the campaign season by reading this article. young man in his late teens early twenties who is wearing a suit and tie The Front Porch Campaign of 1880 In 1880, the first Front Porch Campaign took place at the home of James A. Garfield. About 17,000 visitors came from all over the United States to hear Garfield speak from his front porch. a large gray home with a red roof Campaign Music The music style of Garfield’s campaign marchs and performers was changed from previous candidates due to the influence of music during the Civil War. Learn more about Garfeild and Arthur's march as well as opposing Democratic candidate Gen. Hancock. sheet music of James A. Garfeild's campaign march Holidays with the Garfields Family was very important to James and Lucretia Garfield. Read what their holiday celebrations were like and excerpts from the president's diary. photo of the Garfield family “My Dear Mrs. Garfield”: Condolence Letters to Lucretia Garfield after the President’s Death, Part II “My Dear Mrs. Garfield”: Condolence Letters to Lucretia Garfield after the President’s Death, Part II. Three men wrote to the First Lady about their personal experience with her husband. Read those letters here. First Lady Lucretia Garfield Mrs. Mount Rushmore, Part II Part 2 of Mrs. Mount Rushmore. a painting of Lucretia Garfield James & Lucretia Garfield’s Love Story President and First Lady Garfield were married for 22 years before his life was cut short. This article explores their relationship from beginning to end. President Garfield on the left and First Lady Garfield on the right- these are two paintiings The Story of “Uncle Joe” Rudolph 'Uncle Joe" Rudolph was the brother of First Lady Lucretia Garfield. Read more about his Civil War service with the 42nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, his brother-in-law's regiment, and his life after as he spent many years living at the Mentor farm with the family. young man in his late teens early twenties who is wearing a suit and tie James A. Garfield and the Civil War (Part I) When the Civil War began in 1861, James A. Garfield had no military experience but hoped to be a part of the Union's cause. Learn more about his course to the 42nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. James A. Garfield in a Civil War General uniform The First Lady and the Queen: Two Women Brought Together by Tragedy Queen Victoria and First Lady Lucretia Garfield experienced the death of their husbands at a young age. The queen senr a wreath and handwritten note the Garfield family that are both on display at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. Read more about these two incredible women who suffered such tragedy. Queen Victoria leaning on her hand Education Congressman, Education President (Part I) Education was very important in President James A. Garfield's life. From his own education at the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute in Hiram, Ohio to his becoming a teacher at the same school and at Williams College in Massachusetts. As a father he wanted his children to have the best education. During his time in Congress he was also thinking of the children of United State's education system. This part 1 of the article exlpores all of those aspects. President Garfield Phrenology in Victorian America Phernology, the study of the brain, was a very popular subject during James A. Garfield's time. Learn more about the subject here. phernology brain Colonel Don Pardee of the 42 Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Part 1) Don Pardee and James A. Garfield were both from Ohio and they were both in the Union Army during the Ciivl War. Learn more about their friendship here! Part 2 is also available. yellow faded picture of a man in military uniform Colonel Don Pardee of the 42nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Part II Part 2 of Colonel Don Pardee of the 42nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. yellow faded picture of a man in military uniform James A. Garfield and the Centennial Exposition of 1876 Part 2 Conclusion of 1876 Centennial Exposition article. map showing where buildings are located “This is the Age of Statistics”: James A. Garfield and the 1870 Census (Part I) A member of the House majority, Garfield was tasked with chairing a subcommittee to prepare a legislative plan for the upcoming 1870 census of the United States. Read more about census taking in 1870! census taken in 1870 James A. Garfield and the Centennial Exposition of 1876, Part I Learn more about the Centennial Exposition from 1880 which James A. Garfield and his wife Lucretia attended. map showing where buildings are located Dr. Willard Bliss: A Man of His Time? Dr. Bliss was the main doctor to attend President Garfield after being shot by an assassin. Learn more about the man and his experience of being doctor to the president. a deathbed scene of President Garfield with people surrounding Long Branch, New Jersey: The Resort Town that Hosted President Garfield On September 19, 1881 President James A. Garfield passed away, after being shot, in New Jersey. Learn more about the town where he spent his final days. stone marker where James A. Garfield died in New Jersey Garfield Rocks! (Part II) The conclusion to the Garfield Rocks! article about Berea Sandstone that was used in the construction of some buildings at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. front view of the carriage house turned visitor center Garfield Rocks! (Part I) If you've ever visited the Garfield Memorial in Lake View Cemetery you've seen Berea Sandstone. Berea Sandstone is well-known due to its extensive quarrying history and its use in many historic structures not only locally, but around the United States. a picture of a horse barn Mollie Garfield’s Commemorative Coin Mollie Garfield, daughter of the President and First Lady donated one special piece to be dsiplayed at the Visitor Center at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. Find out more about what she donated here! Mollie Garfield as a young woman James R. Garfield, Gentleman from Mentor (Part 2: A Young Man in Love) Part 2 of James R. Garfield A Young Main In Love. a man with a mustache and a dark suit James R. Garfield, Gentleman from Mentor (Part I): Founding Mentor Library James R. Garfield, second son of President and First Lady Garfield, was the founder of the first library in Mentor, Ohio. Part 1 of this article talks about why he wanted to do so. a gentleman with a mustache wearing a dark suit Harry Garfield and the Spirit of Cooperation Harry A. Garfield, eldest son of the President and his wife, became college president of Williams College in Massachusetts, the same school his late father attended. Find out more about Harry A. Garfield! black and white photo of a man wearing a suit The Homes of the Garfield Children: Hollycroft Hollycroft was the home of James R. Garfield, the son of President and Mrs. Garfield, and family. His home was next to the Mentor farm and would become part of Mrs. Garfield's country estate. Learn more about this home here! a black and white photo of a home A Double Wedding On June 14, 1888 two of the Garfield children had a double wedding ceremony in the Memorial Library. Mollie (left) married Joseph Stanley-Brown and Harry married Belle Mason (right). Learn more about the ceremonies here! two brides standing next to each other in their white wedding dresses Falling Stars: James A. Garfield and the Military Reputations of Generals Irvin McDowell, George McClellan, and Fitz John Porter During the Civil War, James A. Garfield was elected into the House of Representatives but they did not begin session until the end of 1863. While waiting to begin his new position Garfield was part of one of the most celebrated military trials in American history: the court martial of Maj. Gen. Fitz John Porter. Find out more about the trial and what part James A. Garfield played! nineteen men in suits sitting around a table Was the Civil War a “War of Choice?” Was the Civil War a war of choice? Read this article to learn more about the subject. black and white picture of fort sumter Captain Henry of Geauga, Part I Captain Charles E. Henry was a member of the 42nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry beside James A. Garfield. Learn more about the fellow Ohioan and what he did during the Civil War. Part 2 is also available. man with a whote beard and he is also wearing a hat Captain Henry of Geauga, Part II After the war Captain Henry was given a few jobs within the government from his good friend, Congress James A. Garfield. Find out his jobs in government and more about his life here! man with a beard wearing a hat “The Most Impressive Funeral Ever Witnessed”: The Funeral of President Garfield On September 19, 1881 20th President James A. Garfield passed away. This article will describe his final journey from New Jersey to Washington D.C. and the Cleveland, Ohio for his funeral. picture of President James A. Garfield The Federal Civil Service and the Death of President James A. Garfield Charles Guiteau, assassin of President Garfield, has been described as a disappointed office seeker but this article will examine his reasons further that were also political. man wearing a hat is standing to the left of a chair with his left arm resting on the back of it “As a Matter of Fact, I Presume I Shall Live to be President”: A Brief Biographical Sketch of Garfield’s Assassin Charles Guiteau shot President Garfield on July 2, 1881 at the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station (pictured left). Read more about the assassin and the trial that followed after the shooting of the president. outside of a train station The Tragedy…and Triumph of President James A. Garfield and Alexander Graham Bell Alexander Graham Bell had invented a metal detector which was used to find the bullet inside President James A. Garfield. Learn more about Alexander Graham Bell, his invention, and what happened while trying to find the bullet. President Garfield on his deathbed while two doctors are standing next to him Stalwarts, Half Breeds, and Political Assassination Charles Guiteau shot the president July 2, 1881. After being arrested he stated "I am a Stalwart and Arthur is President." Find out his motivation behind the assassination of President Garfield and the split of the Republican Party that may have led to his death. man with curly hair wearing a dark suit is sitting for a photo Robert Todd Lincoln and Presidential Assassiations Robert Todd Lincoln, son of President and First Lady Lincoln, had the misfortune to be at the site of three Presidents of the United States. Read about occassion and how Robert Todd Lincoln was connected. a young man in his early twenties posing for a picture wearing a suit jacket The Execution of Charles Guiteau Charles J. Guitea shot the 20th President of the United States, James A. Garfield, on July 2, 1880. Learn more about his trial and execution that took place in 1882. a man wearing a hat standing next to a chair on the right Around and About James A. Garfield: Whitelaw Reid (Part I) Whitelaw Reid was editor of the New York Tribune for forty years, from 1872 to 1912. He played a major role in politics and was instrumental in presidential candidate James A. Garfield speaking from his home in Mentor, Ohio. a campaign poster- Benjsmin Harrison is on the left and Whitelaw Reid is on the righ Around and About James A. Garfield: Whitelaw Reid (Part II) The conclusion to Around and About James A. Garfield: Whitelaw Reid (Part II). candidate Benjamin Harrison on the left and Whitelaw Reid is on the right Friends to the End Colonel Almon Rockwell and James A. Garfield were lifelong friends who met at the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute. They were in the Civil War together and Almon was at President Garfield's bed side after he was shot by an assassin. Learn more about Colonel Rockwell and the friendship he had with President Garfield. an old photo of Colonel Almon Rockwell who is wearing a suit jacket and bow tie Four Hundred and Eight Strong If you've visited any National Park Service sites you may have noticed that different designations. Such as National Historic Site, National Monument, National Battlefield, or National Seashore to name a few. Learn more about these and other designations and what the name represents! arrowhead that says National Park Service Six Unusual Abraham Lincoln Facts and Rumors, Part II Facts 4-6 of Unusual and Unknown Lincoln Facts. President Abraham Lincoln James A. Garfield and the Lincoln Assassination James A. Garfiedl was a newly elected congressman from Ohio in April 1865 when President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth. Congressman Garfield was in Washington at the time and said to be shocked like the rest of the country by this act. Read about the newspaper article where Garfield supposedly calmed a growing group of rioters. John Wilkes Booth is standing behind President Lincoln holding a pistol Finding History's Forgotten Women with the Natoinal Register of Historic Places (Part 1) March is Women's History Month. Elizabeth C. Quinlan was known as the “Queen of Minneapolis” and she is one of the "forgotten" women in history. The Young-Quinlan Company was the first women’s ready-to-wear shop west of the Mississippi River opened in 1894 and she was the reason. Find out more about Elizabeth and what she did in America's history. woman is wearing a black dress with pearls around her neck while sitting in a chair Finding History’s Forgotten Women with the National Register of Historic Places, Part II Part 2 of Finding History’s Forgotten Women with the National Register of Historic Places. This article will focus on Anna Mary Robertson Moses or "Grandma Moses" as she was also known. woman is wearing a black dress with pearls around her neck while sitting in a chair How Do Fees Help Your National Parks? While you visit James A. Garfield National Historic Site you will see our fee program in action! Find out more here. Garfield Home with a red roof Presidents and Politicians: The 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry Many future politicians and presidents were members of the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the Civil War. Read more about the men who served and their stories. James A. Garfield and a Black Washingtonian, Part II Conclusion to James A. Garfield and a Black Washingtonian. James Wormley I am a Volunteer Volunteering at a National Park Service site can be very fulfilling. One of the volunteers at James A. Garfield National Historic Site shares a typical summer day at the home of President Garfield and his family! a round patvh on a shirt sleeve that says Volunteer in white letters Why We Laugh Samuel S. Cox served alongside James Garfield in the House of Representatives for fourteen years. In 1876, the same year the family the mentor farm, Samuel gifted a copy of the book Why We Laugh to Congressman Garfield. That book is now on displayed in the Memorial Library at James A. Garfield National Historic Site. Read to learn more about the friendship between Cox and Garfield. man with long and bushy sideburns portrait taken out of a book “Special Preparations”: The Crafting of an Inaugural Address Shortly after being naugurated as the 20th President of the United States, James A. Garfield started the process of writing his Inaugural Speech. His diary entries leading up to March 4, 1881 show us the process in which he had taken to complete the speech. picture of President James A. Garfield “The Most Important Political Change We Have Known”: James A. Garfield, Slavery, and Justice in the Civil War Era, Part II Conclusion to “The Most Important Political Change We Have Known”: James A. Garfield, Slavery, and Justice in the Civil War Era article. General Garfield with a beard is wearing his Union uniform James A. Garfield and the “Yankee Dutchman”: Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel Major General Franz Sigel and James A. Garfield met each other in 1862. General Garfield's letters during the Civil War were put into a book called, The Wild Life of the Army: Civil War Letters of James A. Garfield. This article will examine the relationship and admiration Garfield had for a fellow Union officer. Franz Sigel Hurrah for Hancock Then candidate James A. Garfield gave many speeches from his front porch. A newspaper writer, James F. Ryder, happened to be at the Mentor farm on one of those days. Read the story told by the reporter and who it involved. little boy who is looking to the left Garfield’s Speech: Soldier’s Monument Dedication, Painesville, Ohio Congressman James A. Garfield delivered the keynote address at the ceremony dedicating a new Soldier’s Monument in Painesville Memorial Park. The monument still stands in Painesville’s town square today, nearly 140 years later. Read about the ceremony and the speech he gave. a Civil War monument that stands in Painesville, Ohio Murder, Mayhem, Voter Fraud, and Political High Jinks: The U.S. Army’s Thankless Task in the South, 1865-77 The Reconstruction Era started after the Civil War and lasted for many years. This article will touch on the U.S. Military and how they were stationed in the southern states during this time. portrait of President Andrew Johnson Mary Clemmer Ames and “Ten Years in Washington” Mary Clemmer Ames' book Ten Years in Washington, was first published in 1874. The book is an engaging account of the notable buildings and agencies centered in the nation’s capital, and the people whose activities breathed life into them. Read excerpts from her book which include First Lady Julia Grant, First Lady Lucretia Garfield among others. Mary Clemmer Ames portrait The 1879 “Government Shutdown,” Part II Part 2 of The 1879 “Government Shutdown”. President Rutherford B. Hayes 18th President of the U.S. Copying Campaign Correspondence In the Campaign Office at James A. Garfield National Historic Site there is a wet press. This machine would be used to copy correspondence during James A. Garfield's presidential campaign. a drawing of the outside of a small building President James A. Garfield’s Inaugural Address, March 4, 1881 March 4, 1881, in Washington D.C., James A. Garfield was sworn in as the 20th President of the United States. Read his Inaugural Address here. President Garfield standing to the right of a chair with his hand on the back On Presidential Births and Deaths There are many connections between the Presidents. This article will explore some of those connections. the United States Presidential Seal James Garfield: Congressman (Part I) James A. Garfield was a member of Congress for 17 years. This article will explore the first five Congressional terms ans the issues that he faced while in Washington, D.C. Garfield is wearing a straw hat and sitting in the picture The Generosity of James Rudolph Garfield Just in time for the holidays, this story revolves around James R. Garfield, second son of President and First Lady Garfield. During World War II, James R. hosted refugee children from England. Read to find out more! an older couple standing next to each other Assignment: Harry & Mollie Garfield’s Wedding Day In June of 1888 Mollie Garfield and her brother Harry were married in a double wedding ceremony inside the Garfield's home. Newspaper articles from that time show how important an event like this was to Mentor, Cleveland, and even the country. a picture of two older couples looking at a photo Celebrating the 19th Amendment On August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment became an official part of the US Constitution. The amendment made it possible for women to vote because it prohibited states and the federal government from denying access to the ballot box based on sex. While the amendment did not guarantee the vote for women, is was an important milestone in women’s equality. Explore the stories of a few important women connected to three National Park sites in northeast Ohio. Women in early 1900s attire smile holding a banner which reads, An Open and Businesslike Campaign This article will explore the "campaign" James A. Garfield made to earn a seat in the United States Senate in 1879. James A. Garfield portrait in a golden circle “The Rough and Tumble of a Public School” Franklin School in Washington, DC., was located near the Garfield home. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places and even one of the children, Harry, attended the school. Read this article to learn about the school and the public education of Harry, James, Mollie, Irvin and Abram Garfield. view of a building made of bricks used as a school James A. Garfield in Muskingum County, Ohio James A. Garfield had many jobs in his short 49 years of life. One of those jobs was as a teacher in Ohio. Henry Ballou, uncle to the future president, lived in Muskingum County, Ohio. James and his mother lived at his home a short time. Learn more about took the Garfield's to southeastern Ohio. map of Ohio with the county of Muskingum in red James A. Garfield and a Black Washingtonian, Part I James Wormley's hotel, Wormley Hotel, had become one of the favorite places for the leading citizens of the capital city, Washington D.C., where they could find the finest accommodations and delicious food. Learn more about the man and the hotel he owned. Part 2 is also available! man wearing a bow tie, picture says James Wormley in yellow font Telegraphy and the 1880 Presidential Election Technology was ever-changing in the mid-nineteenth century and the use of telegraphs was becoming very popular. During the campaign of 1880 the technology was very important. Find out how telegraphs and Morse code worked and why it was so important to then candidiate James A. Garfield. Two views of the same small building. A building that looks like a home with a front porch Garfield Reflects On Veterans James A. Garfield was an active member of several veteran organizations, and was a vocal supporter of the monuments, statues, and pension acts for which his fellow veterans advocated. Read about a speech Garfield gave where he spoke to the realities facing many of his fellow veterans. a faded portrait of James A. Garfield wearing his Union Army uniform The Joy of Historical Sleuthing The Wooten Desk is one of the many original artifacts that visitors can see on their tour of the Garfield Home. Park Ranger Alan Gephardt, of our staff, found letters from First Lady Lucretia Garfield from 1882 about the desk. a large writing desk that has many little cubby holes for storage and the desk is on wheels Treaty of Mentor The "Treaty of Mentor" is said to have taken place inside the Garfield Home in Mentor, Ohio. It was a meeting between presidential candidate James A. Garfield, Roscie Conkling and former President Grant. Did the meeting really occur or was this something newspapers made up? Find out here! painting of President James A. Garfield Mourning President Garfield On July 2, 1881 President James A. Garfield was shot inside the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad Station in Washington, D.C. How did the country mourned for their 20th President? Find out here. shows a white farm house and barn with a dirt road in front The “Fine Times” of James A. Garfield’s Education, Part I James A. Garfield spent his school years in northeast Ohio as well as Massachusetts. In this article his time at Geauga Seminary (Chesterland) and also the Western Reserve Eclectic Institute (now Hiram College) will be explored. young Garfield wearing a jacket Eliza Arabella "Little Trot" and Edward "Neddie" Garfield Eliza Arabella, the first child of James A. Garfield and Lucretia Garfield, died at a young age of diphtheria. Edward "Neddie" Garfield (pictured here) was the couple's last child; he died of whooping cough. Read more about these children here. Edward Garfield is wearing a hat with a blue ribbon around the brim The “Fine Times” of James A. Garfield’s Education, Part II In part 2 of, The “Fine Times” of James A. Garfield’s Education, Garfield's time at Williams College in Massachusetts will be explored. young Garfield on rhe left and young Lucretia on the right “The Vanishing First Lady”-or Am I? Debbie Weinkamer portrays First Lady Lucretia Garfield and writes about her life with James and their family. a close up picture of First Lady Lucretia Garfield “My Dear Mrs. Garfield”: Condolence Letters to Lucretia Garfield After the President’s Death, Part I After the death of President James A. Garfield, First Lady Lucretia Garfield received many condolence letters from people all over the country. Ranger Alan of our staff found some of the letters while visiting the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Read some of the letters sent to her. First Lady Lucretia Garfield Mrs. Mount Rushmore? If there was a version of Mount Rushmore called Mrs. Rushmore what First Ladies would be on it? Ranger Joan of our staff asked this question. Read the possibilities here. painting of Lucretia Garfield A “Testimonial of Esteem”: The Pietra Dura of President James A. Garfield First Lady Lucretia Garfield received many different memorial pieces after the death of her husband, President Garfield. One of those items came from an Italian artist in 1882. The piece, a pietra dura is located inside the Memorial Library. Find out more about the artifact here. mosaic piece shows President Garfield in the center James A. Garfield and the Civil War (Part II) Part 2 of James A. Garfield and the Civil War explores Garfield involvement during the Battle of Chickamauga and later wartime experiences. Battle of Chickamauga Giles B. Harber: Navy Cadet, Admiral, Friend of James & Lucretia Garfield Giles Bates Harber became the first Naval Academy cadet appointed by Congressman James A. Garfield in 1878.The two developed a relationship and accounts can be found in the president's diary. Learn more of their friendship with each other and see one of the artifacts in the Garfield Home that was a gift from Giles B. Harber. older gentleman wearing his Naval uniform E.T.C. Aldrich Edmond Tilson Cantine Aldrich, ETC, was the neighbor of presidential candidate James A. Garfield in Mentor, Ohio. Read some of the diary entries he made during the summer of 1880 and the election campaign. black and white photo of a man wearing a suit and a white beard “This is the Age of Statistics”: James A. Garfield and the 1870 Census (Part II) Continue reading about Congressman Garfield's involvement in the census of 1870 and a new law proposal about the census he wrote. picture of President James A. Garfield's home in Mentor, Ohio First Official National Decoration Day James A. Garfield gave the first Decoration Day speech at Arlington National Cemetery on May 30, 1868. Read the speech here. picture of President James A. Garfield James Garfield: Congressman (Part II) This is the continuation and conclusion of the James Garfield: Congressman article. man with a beard wearing a straw hat Education Congressman, Education President (Part II) Part 2 of Education Congressman, Education President. Congressman Garfield was a part of the establishment of The School for the Deaf and Dumb (now Gallaudet College) in D.C. and also a supporter of the US Geological Survey and the Naval Observatory. Find out more here! picture of President James A. Garfield The 1879 “Government Shutdown,” Part I In recent history there have been a few times when the United States government has been shutdown. Has this ever happened in history before? In 1879 the threat was very real. This is part 1 of The 1879 Government Shutdown. Read how Congressman Garfield was a part. President Rutherford B. Hayes picture as he looks to the left “It Bristles with Law Points”: James A. Garfield’s Career as a Lawyer, Part I On January 26, 1861, James A. Garfield was admitted to the Ohio Bar. His first case as a lawyer was Ex parte Milligan (Milligan pictured to the left) which took place before the United Stated Supreme Court. Learn more about the case. Lambdin Milligan "The Most Important Political Change We Have Known" JAG, Slavery, and Justice in the Civil War Era (part 1) This article will explore Garfield's thoughts and feelings about African-Americans, specifically slavery through diary entries. James A. Garfield in a Civil War General uniform “It Bristles with Law Points”: James A. Garfield’s Career as a Lawyer, Part II Part 2 of "It Bristles with Law Points". James A. Garfield would keep a job as a part-time lawyer during his Congressional career. Find out what other cases he took part in here! James A. Garfield in a dark colored suit with a bow tie James A. Garfield’s Letter Accepting the 1880 Republican Presidential Nomination On July 12, 1880, James A. Garfield accepted the nomination as the next republican presidential candidate. Read his letter of acceptance here. President James A. Garfield portrait looking to the right From Rhetoric to Railroad to Radio: Ohio’s Presidential Campaigns There were eight presidents from the state of Ohio . Read this article to learn more about each of those presidential campaigns. picture showing the Garfield Home as visitors in carriages arrive in front of the home “An Event of Considerable Importance” During the campaign season of 1880 the Garfield family welcomed visitors to their Mentor farm. At the end of September that year two different events occurred at their home and were recorded by the president himself in his diary. Read to find out more. 1880 photo of the farm with the whaite Garfield home More to Explore at Your National Parks When someone asks how many National Parks are there, they are thinking about the "big" parks such as the Grand Canyon or Yosemite. If you ask a National Park Service Park Ranger the answer probably be for the whole system. This article explores some of the historic and cultural sites in the National Park Service including James A. Garfield National Historic Site! brick path leading to a large white house and a tree is in front of the house with branches James Garfield and Joshua Chamberlain Joshua Chamberlain wrote a letter offering advice to Mrs. Garfield who was recovering from malaria in New Jersey. The letter also invited the president to Maine to attend a graduation ceremony at Bowdoin College on July 14, 1881. Read the letter here. General Garfield on the left and General Chamberlain on the right Good Fences... James A. Garfield National Historic Site has a new fence surrounding the site. That got us thinking about how many fences did the Garfield family have while living here. Find out more about the different fences and view pictures as well. Garfield farm and home Lucretia R. Garfield: A Remarkable Life Part 2 Continuation of Lucretia Rudolph Garfield: A Remarkable Life. First Lady Lucretia R. Garfield is a lesser known First Lady because her husband only served 200 days as president. Here at James A. Garfield National Historic Site her story continues about 37 years longer as she changed the family into what visitors see when visiting. Learn more about her as she served the country, created the First Presidential Memorial Library, and much more. Lucretia Garfield in 1911 Malaria: The Evil Spirit of the White House The First Lady’s Illness, Part Two As First Lady Lucretia Garfield began to recover from malaria it was decided that a trip to Elberon, New Jersey was in order. Learn more about her recovery here! a green tinted layout of the grounds Malaria: The Evil Spirit of the White House First Lady Lucretia Garfield suffered from malaria in May of 1881. Her husband, President Garfield, was consumed with worry for her. Readers will view the progression of her illness through diary entries of President James A. Garfield. White House with a black cloud Plan Like a James A. Garfield NHS Park Ranger Starting to plan Summer vacation? Here are 10 important tips to consider when visiting James A. Garfield National Historic Site. James A. Garfield National Historic Site Cultural Landscape The home and farm of President James A Garfield, nicknamed "Lawnfield," remains significant for its association with President Garfield and for its distinctive design. In 1880, visitors and reporters traveled to Congressman and presidential candidate Garfield's Mentor, Ohio farm to hear him deliver campaign speeches from his porch. After President Garfield’s assassination in 1881, his widow, Lucretia Rudolph Garfield, made many improvements to the buildings and landscape. Leaves of overhanging trees frame a one-story structure with siding and a small front porch. Lucretia Garfield’s perilous journey First Lady Lucretia Garfield was in Elberon, New Jersey recovering from malaria in 1881. While there she was told that her husband, President Garfield, had been shot. Learn more about her travel and how she found out about this tragedy. Elberon House Hotel in New Jersey Famous Inventor Tried to Help Save President’s Life On July 2, 1881, President James A. Garfield was shot by an assassin. Alexander Graham Bell brought a new invention, a metal detector, to the bedside of the president. This article will explore his new creation and how it was used in July of 1881. a young man with dark hair and beard looking to the left Country mourns as president is laid to rest This article will discuss the funeral of President James A. Garfield. drawing of President James A. Garfield James A. Garfield Continuation of the biography of President James A. Garfield. a man standing with his left hand on the back of a chair October birthdays for 2 sons During the month of October James A. Garfield National Historic Site celebrates two of the Garfield children's birthdays. Read about whose birthday it is! a family photo of Lucretia Garfield surround by four of her adult children and grandchildren GoFundMe account set up for the Garfield family in 1881 After President Garfield was shot in 1881 Cyrus Field (pictured), a family friend, created a fund for First Lady Lucretia Garfield and her children. This fund is what we know as a GoFundMe page today. Learn more here. a man wearing a suit is holding a paper in his right hand Fat Book Week You've heard of #FatBearWeek...now get ready for #FatBookWeek! In honor of the 10,000+ books in the Longfellow family collection, we called on other literary-minded sites to submit the fattest book in their museum collections for a tournament-style bracket of 10 heavyweight tomes. Check out the bracket, then visit @LONGNPS on Instagram each morning from October 6-12 to vote for your favorite bulky book! Graphic of a bear with a paw on a stack of books. Text reads "Fat Book Week October 6-12, 2021"

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