"Barataria Preserve Audio Tour Stop 7" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Jean Lafitte

National Historical Park and Preserve - Louisiana

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve (French: Parc historique national et réserve Jean Lafitte) protects the natural and cultural resources of Louisiana's Mississippi River Delta region. It is named after pirate Jean Lafitte and consists of six separate sites and a park headquarters. Three sites interpret the Cajun culture of the Lafayette (southern Louisiana) area, which developed after Acadians were resettled in the region following their expulsion from Canada (1755–1764) by the British, and the transfer of French Louisiana to Spain in the aftermath of the French and Indian War.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/jela/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Lafitte_National_Historical_Park_and_Preserve Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve (French: Parc historique national et réserve Jean Lafitte) protects the natural and cultural resources of Louisiana's Mississippi River Delta region. It is named after pirate Jean Lafitte and consists of six separate sites and a park headquarters. Three sites interpret the Cajun culture of the Lafayette (southern Louisiana) area, which developed after Acadians were resettled in the region following their expulsion from Canada (1755–1764) by the British, and the transfer of French Louisiana to Spain in the aftermath of the French and Indian War. In Jean Lafitte's day, silver and gold filled a pirate's treasure chest, but today's treasures are people, places, and memories. Discover New Orleans’ rich cultural mix. Learn Cajun traditions from people who live them. Watch an alligator bask on a bayou’s bank. Walk in the footsteps of the men who fought at 1815’s Battle of New Orleans. Follow the link to discover the treasure of Jean Lafitte. Jean Lafitte's headquarters and the park's French Quarter Visitor Center is located at 419 Decatur St. in New Orleans. There are five other park sites scattered throughout south Louisiana. For information on all of the park sites and visitor centers, see the Directions URL. Acadian Cultural Center Permanent and special exhibits, an award-winning film, ranger talks, and programs share the history, customs, language, and contemporary culture of the Acadians who became Louisiana's Cajuns. Admission to the center and to most programs is free. The Acadian Cultural Center is located south of Interstate 10 in Lafayette, near the airport and just east of the intersection of Surrey Street and Evangeline Throughway/Highway 90. Barataria Preserve With more than 26,000 acres of wild Louisiana wetlands, the Barataria Preserve's hardwood forest, swamp, bayous, and marsh offer trails, picnic areas, fishing, hunting (in season and with permits), and wildlife viewing. Visitor center films and exhibits explain the wetlands habitat and current environmental challenges; ranger programs are offered daily. Programs at the environmental education center are available by reservation. Admission to the preserve and to most programs is free. The Barataria Preserve is located 17 miles south of New Orleans on the west bank of the Mississippi River; Barataria Blvd./Highway 45 runs through the preserve. Note that not all GPS systems find the preserve successfully, so double check your GPS against a map. The Visitor Center is located just off of Highway 45. Chalmette Battlefield and Chalmette National Cemetery Site of the Battle of New Orleans in 1815, Chalmette Battlefield contains a reconstructed American rampart, an 1830s house, 100-foot-high Chalmette Monument, and outdoor exhibits for self-guided tours. Visitor center films and exhibits share the battle and the site's later history. Ranger talks offered daily. Chalmette National Cemetery was established during the Civil War and holds more than 14,000 graves of Americans from the War of 1812 to the Vietnam War; audio tour available. Free Chalmette Battlefield & Chalmette National Cemetery are 7 miles downriver from New Orleans and located next to each other. They are south of I-10 near Paris Road (Interstate 510/Highway 47). Note: St. Bernard Highway/Highway 46 in Chalmette is the same street as St. Claude Avenue in New Orleans. GPS Users: To reach the battlefield visitor center, use One Battlefield Road. 8606 West St. Bernard Highway is the battlefield/national cemetery mailing address and GPS will provide directions to the cemetery. French Quarter Visitor Center Visitor center exhibits and a film share the history and traditions of the lower Mississippi River delta and of New Orleans, home to one of America's most distinctive cultural mixes and rich in food, music, architecture, and more. Free admission. Jean Lafitte's French Quarter Visitor Center is located on Decatur Street between Conti and St. Louis Streets, just a few blocks from Jackson Square. No parking is available at the visitor center, but there are several pay-to-park lots available within easy walking distance. Prairie Acadian Cultural Center The Acadian exiles from Canada's Nova Scotia who settled Louisiana's prairies developed a distinctive cultural mix of Cajun, Creole, and cowboy. The Prairie Acadian Cultural Center tells this story through ranger programs, exhibits, and films. The center features cooking and crafts demonstrations, local musicians, and dancing for all. Center admission is free. This visitor center is currently closed. However, programming is offered off-site. From I-10, take Exit 80 to Route 13 north. After 18 miles, at the stop sign, turn left onto Maple Ave. In .2 miles, turn right on S C C Duson St. In .4 miles, turn left on Park Ave. After .1 miles, the Prairie Acadian Cultural Center is on your right. 250 Park Ave Eunice, LA 70535 Wetlands Acadian Cultural Center The Acadian exiles who settled along Louisiana's bayous created a distinctive Cajun culture based on life in a watery realm. The center shares their way of life through a film, special and permanent exhibits, musical performances, and boat tours of Bayou Lafourche. Admission to the center and to most programs is free; boat tours are by ticket and reservation. Bayou Lafourche runs through the city of Thibodaux; Highway 308 follows its north bank and Highway 1 its south bank. The center is located on the south bank of Bayou Lafourche near downtown Thibodaux and the Jackson Street bridge. Barataria Preserve of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Spanish moss hangs from live oak tree Spanish moss and lush vegetation provide glimpses of Louisiana's wild wetlands at Jean Lafitte's Barataria Preserve. Chalmete Battlefield at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve An oak tree arches over a cannon-guarded rampart with historic house and American flag in background Chalmette Battlefield's American rampart and cannons still guard the site of the Battle of New Orleans in 1815. Chalmette National Cemetery at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Setting sun lights up cemetery headstones Established during the Civil War, Chalmette National Cemetery's 14,000+ headstones pay tribute to those buried there. French Quarter Visitor Center of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Visitor center exhibit titled "Crossroads of Cultures" Hundreds of years of history and thousands of people from all over the world have created New Orleans' distinctive cultural mix. Acadian Cultural Center of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Model of an early Acadian home sits in a glass case Bringing skills and traditions from Nova Scotia, the Acadian exiles in Louisiana found a new home and a new name---Cajuns. Wetlands Acadian Cultural Center of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Exhibit case full of musical instruments Acadian (Cajun) music began in cabins and dancehalls and has become famous worldwide. Prairie Acadian Cultural Center of Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve guitar sits on a dimly lit porch styled stage The Music Porch at the Prairie Acadian Cultural Center in Eunice, LA National Parks and National Cemeteries Currently, the National Park Service manages 14 national cemeteries. These cemeteries represent a continuum of use dating to a period before the establishment of the historical parks of which they are an integral part and are administered to preserve the historic character, uniqueness, and solemn nature of both the cemeteries and the historical parks of which they are a part. Setting sun lights up graves and decorations Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. Barataria Preserve Trail-Based Water Quality Monitoring Project The Barataria Preserve elevation & hydrology dynamics monitoring array project was a collaboration between Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve (JELA) ecologists, staff, and college interns. It sought to develop an understanding of basic water quality conditions at the park and assess interior freshwater wetland locations not already studied by regional NPS Inventory and Monitoring teams. JELA marsh “The rattle of his drum was heard [even] amidst the din of battle… in the hottest hell of fire” Throughout the War of 1812, more than 4,800 slaves fled their bondage, and were evacuated as refugees to Bermuda, and later to Canada, Trinidad, and other British colonies. When Admiral Cochrane began planning his Gulf Coast campaign, he anticipated refugee slaves would swell his ranks, supplement his army, and potentially topple American control of the region. Photo of Jordan Noble: Old man with long white beard Choctaw recruits fight with the U.S. Army The road to the Battle of New Orleans for the Choctaws began with the Redstick Creek attack on Fort Mims on August 30, 1813. Map of the Battle New Orleans NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, Louisiana Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] wetland grasses Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road. Resetting Ground Supporting Headstones Grave markers may need to be reset for a variety of reasons. The techniques that we will cover in this video are applicable to any grave marker that is ground supported: no other base, held upright only by pressure of the Earth. Run the line levels and measure out for the row we are working on. When resetting in an organized cemetery such as Chalmette, bring the stone up to proper height and keep it inline with the other stones in its rows and aisles. Jason Church, speaking in Chalmette National Cemetery, about resetting ground supported headstones. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Outside Science (inside parks): Swamp Science in Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve Join the Outside Science (inside parks) team at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve as they use different techniques to measure how much flooding has increased at Barataria Preserve. image of swamp water. text reads Swamp science outside science inside parks Women in Fire Science: Alicia Schlarb Alicia Schlarb is the lead fire effects monitor for a portion of the National Park Service's Southeast Region. She and her crew provide prescribed burning, monitoring, and wildland fire responses to national parks located within Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and portions of Tennessee, Kentucky, and Florida. She loves fire and that she can change perceptions about wildland fire through science. Alicia Schlarb. Hunter Miles Davis' Journey from Intern to Park Ranger, Musician, and Audio Producer at the National Park Service Meet Hunter Miles Davis, a Park Guide at New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park and learn about his pathway to the National Park Service. He was a Greening Youth Foundation intern at this park and at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve and is now a full time NPS employee. Watch the video at the end as he explains his journey. Hunter jamming on drums as a Ranger inside NOLA Jazz Museum

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