"John Day Fossil Beds. No Photoshop required." by Rikki / Julius Reque , public domain

John Day Fossil Beds

National Monument - Oregon

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is a U.S. National Monument in Wheeler and Grant counties in east-central Oregon. Located within the John Day River basin and managed by the National Park Service, the park is known for its well-preserved layers of fossil plants and mammals that lived in the region between the late Eocene, about 45 million years ago, and the late Miocene, about 5 million years ago. The monument consists of three geographically separate units: Sheep Rock, Painted Hills, and Clarno

maps

Official Visitor Map of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).John Day Fossil Beds - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument (NM) in Oregon. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Prineville Northeast in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Central Oregon - Prineville Northeast 2015

Map of Prineville Northeast in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Map of John Day Central North Half in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Central Oregon - John Day Central North Half 2014

Map of John Day Central North Half in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Map of John Day West South Half in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Central Oregon - John Day West South Half 2014

Map of John Day West South Half in the Central Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

https://www.nps.gov/joda/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acadia_National_Park John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is a U.S. National Monument in Wheeler and Grant counties in east-central Oregon. Located within the John Day River basin and managed by the National Park Service, the park is known for its well-preserved layers of fossil plants and mammals that lived in the region between the late Eocene, about 45 million years ago, and the late Miocene, about 5 million years ago. The monument consists of three geographically separate units: Sheep Rock, Painted Hills, and Clarno Colorful rock formations at John Day Fossil Beds preserve a world class record of plant and animal evolution, changing climate, and past ecosystems that span over 40 million years. Exhibits and a working lab at the Thomas Condon Paleontology and Visitor Center as well as scenic drives and hikes at all three units allow visitors to explore the prehistoric past of Oregon and see science in action. John Day Fossil Beds encompasses 14,000 acres in three geographically separated units in Oregon: Sheep Rock, Painted Hills, and Clarno. The Sheep Rock Unit is located between the towns of Dayville and Kimberly. The Painted Hills Unit is located 9 miles northwest of of the town of Mitchell. The Clarno Unit is located on Highway 218 twenty miles west of the town of Fossil. Thomas Condon Paleontology and Visitor Center Located in the Sheep Rock Unit, the Thomas Condon Paleontology Center is an NPS research facility dedicated to the John Day Fossil Beds. It is also the park visitor center and fossil museum. Picture windows let you view the working laboratory and collections room with over 60,000 specimens. In the fossil museum gallery, you can walk through nearly 50 million years of the Age of Mammals. Hundreds of fossil specimens are displayed, along with eight large murals depicting plants and animals of the time. The Thomas Condon Paleontology and Visitor Center is on Highway 19, two miles north of the junction with Highway 26. Sheep Rock Sheep Rock Sheep Rock, with the John Day River in the foreground Painted Hills Painted Hills The Painted Hills on a stormy winter day. Clarno Clarno The Clarno Palisades are remains of ancient volcanic mudslides. Paleontologist at work Paleontologist at work The Thomas Condon Paleontology Center is both a visitor center and research center. Historic James Cant Ranch Home White house surrounded by green with concrete path leading to the front Cant Ranch home 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments NPS Geodiversity Atlas—John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] river and mountain Geologic Maps in Action—Support Science <strong>John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon</strong><br> Example of the application of geologic map data to support paleontology research programs. fossil snail shell Cant Ranch Historic District Cultural Landscape The Cant Ranch Historic District is located in the Sheep Rock Unit of John Day Fossil Beds National Monument established in 1974. The Cant Ranch Historic District, as established in the 1984 National Register nomination, is a 200-acre vernacular landscape that documents early 20th century ranching operations in the John Day River Valley. Cant Ranch Complex Wildland Fire in Sagebrush Sagebrush will burn when the surrounding grasses are dry. With strong winds, fire spreads rapidly with flames sometimes reaching over 30 feet high. While fire easily kills sagebrush, the other plants resprout from protected roots producing lush forage for wildlife and livestock. Close-up of sagebrush leaves Arrowhead Adventures The iconic National Park Service arrowhead emblem was created in 1949 by Dr. Aubrey Neasham. He used symbols to show us ideas and themes important to the National Parks. What do you think they the symbols mean? Find out more by completing this activity and then create your own arrowhead for specifically for John Day Fossil Bed! a black and white drawing of the National Park Service arrowhead logo Coloring Pages of John Day Fossil Beds Unearth fossil animals and plants found at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument by printing your own coloring pages! two children with an adult are seated and smile while looking up from coloring Mystery Fossil Game Explore John Day Fossil Beds National Monument’s website to find amazing fossil animals and plants. Discover the fossils of the John Day Region and learn how Oregon has changed, right from where you already are! a cat-like animal with saber tooth wearing a ranger hat examines a fossil using a magnify lens New Paleontologist joins staff at John Day Fossil Beds After an extensive search, Nick Famoso was selected as the new Chief Paleontologist at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. Nick recently completed his PhD at the University of Oregon and is excited to begin his new career with the National Park Service. Nick Famoso posing with a Flat Stanley Junior Ranger Program Take care of our National Treasures by becoming a Junior Ranger at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. This park is a window into the past with the rock record spanning nearly 50 million years! Here, the rock layers record the time after the dinosaurs went extinct and mammals diversified to dominate the landscape. Complete as many activities as you can, then e-mail or mail your finished booklet to Park Rangers at John Day Fossil Beds to receive your badge. John Day Fossil Beds junior ranger booklet color shows Painted Hills and sketches of fossil animals Website Scavenger Hunt Are you ready to take on the challenge of virtually exploring the park? Explore the park at your home and discover more about the Age of Mammals and Flowering Plants at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. a cat-like saber-toothed animal wearing a ranger hat examines a newspaper article Jennifer Cavin, Fossil Preparator at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument Jennifer Cavin has been the fossil preparator at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, Oregon, since 2008. Her work involves exposing collected fossils from the surrounding rock, repairing damage to specimens, and other tasks that are intended to preserve and protect fossils for future study and display. a person in a lab coat working on a fossil Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 12, No. 2, Fall 2020 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> fossils on the ground with two people and a mountain in the distance Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Uses of Geologic Information Geologic maps are critical to understanding a national park. Park staff use geologic maps for many purposes. These are just a few examples. colorful section of a geologic map of bryce canyon Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 09, No. 1, Spring 2017 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology News</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> NPS Paleontology logo illustration with fossil icons Paleogene Period—66.0 to 23.0 MYA Colorful Paleogene rocks are exposed in the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon National Park and the badlands of Badlands and Theodore Roosevelt national parks. Extraordinary Paleogene fossils are found in Fossil Butte and John Day Fossil Beds national monuments, among other parks. fossil skull with teeth expsoed Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Scientist Profile: Tom Rodhouse, Ecologist and Project Manager Meet Tom Rodhouse, ecologist for the Upper Columbia Basin Network. Tom studies the plants and animals of our National Parks, and believes we have an important role to play in protecting these special places. Read about his adventures as a field wildlife biologist, and how he got to be where he is today. Biologist smiles by sweeping view of green fields, conifer treetops, and snow-capped mountains. Using GIS Data to Improve Fossil Collection Practices at John Day Fossil Beds National Monument John Day Fossil Beds National Monument protects geologic formations that contain one of the longest, most continuous fossil records on Earth. Staff were scheduled to prospect for fossils in each of the park's five most productive areas, every four years. Yet the areas were large, and staff availability varied. They were almost never able to stick to the schedule. So they started to wonder: was a four-year cycle really the best way to find the most fossils? Person kneeling in fossil quarry working with small tools to remove rock matrix from a fossil. A New Resource for Researching America's Elephants Mammoths, mastodons, and other proboscideans are among the most familiar fossil organisms. An inventory complied by Jim Mead and others documents the occurrences of these animals in 63 National Park Service units. photo-illustration of a ranger standing next to a mammoth Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 13, No. 1, Spring 2021 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> park ranger in uniform

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