"John Muir Home" by NPS Photos/Luther Bailey , public domain

John Muir

National Historic Site - California

The John Muir National Historic Site is located in the San Francisco Bay Area, in Martinez, Contra Costa County, California.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Overview Map of the East Bay Regional Park District in California. Published by the East Bay Regional Park District.East Bay Regional Parks - Overview Map

Overview Map of the East Bay Regional Park District in California. Published by the East Bay Regional Park District.

https://www.nps.gov/jomu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Muir_National_Historic_Site The John Muir National Historic Site is located in the San Francisco Bay Area, in Martinez, Contra Costa County, California. John Muir played many roles in his life, all of which helped him succeed in his role as an advocate for Nature. As America’s most famous naturalist and conservationist, Muir fought to protect the wild places he loved, places we can still visit today. Muir’s writings convinced the U.S. government to protect Yosemite, Sequoia, Grand Canyon and Mt. Rainier as national parks. Please visit our main website for specific directions to our park. You may call the John Muir Visitor Center for additional information. John Muir National Historic Site Visitor Center Main visitor center for the John Muir National Historic Site in Martinez, California. Directions to the John Muir National Historic Site can be found on our website. John Muir Home at the John Muir National Historic Site John Muir Home at the John Muir National Historic Site John Muir Home at the John Muir National Historic Site John Muir National Historic Site A old copper sprayer sits against a tree-line background. Historic Copper Sprayer. Mount Wanda A natural foot path winds its way through hills and trees. Mount Wanda walking trail. John Muir National Historic Site A tall wooden windmill and a small white shed surrounded by trees. The old windmill. John Muir National Historic Site Old books, a writing pen and inkwell, and paper sit on John Muir's original desk. John Muir's desk in the "Scribble Den". John Muir and his efforts to preserve Mount Rainier John Muir and his efforts to preserve Mount Rainier As president of the newly formed Sierra Club, John Muir gave numerous lectures and wrote various articles advocating for the preservation of Mount Rainier from the years 1893 to 1899. Muir also made efforts to unite other organizations across the nation who were pursuing the same cause. Image of John Muir NPS Geodiversity Atlas—John Muir National Historic Site, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] historic home Bat Inventory of Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site, John Muir National Historic Site and Point Reyes National Seashore Bats are economically and ecologically important animals, providing ecosystem services such as pollination and predation of insects. In general, bat populations are believed to be declining. Researchers used acoustic sampling to inventory bat populations at Eugene O'Neill National Historic Site, John Muir National Historic Site, and Point Reyes National Seashore. All of these parks are on the wildland-urban interface. Photo of a hoary bat. Designing the Parks: Learning in Action The Designing the Parks program is not your typical internship. Each year since 2013, this program at the Olmsted Center for Landscape Preservation has introduced a cohort of college students and recent graduates to NPS design and planning professions through projects related to cultural landscape stewardship. In the internships, made possible by partner organizations, participants focus on an in-depth project that directly engages with a national park unit. A group of young people stand on forest trail and listen to two maintenance employees National Parks Pitch In to Help Save Monarch Butterflies As scientists and citizen scientists have noted, insect populations are plummeting across the globe. Monarch butterfly populations are no exception. Recent counts show that the western population has experienced a precipitous drop. As of 2018, the population of monarchs overwintering along the California coast stands at just 0.6% of what it was in the 1980s. Monarch butterflies among eucalyptus leaves, viewed through a scope Early Detection News – Spring 2018 Invasive Species Early Detection (ISED) team surveys began in April. They will be concentrated at Point Reyes National Seashore this year, with some additional work at Pinnacles National Park and John Muir National Historic Site. Barbed goatgrass How will Climate Change Affect Bay Area National Park Birds? The National Audubon Society has created research summaries for 274 national park units that describe how projected changes in climate under different emissions scenarios are likely to affect local bird populations. Hummingbird and house finch on the same branch Early Detection News, July 2017 A new edition of Early Detection News for July 2017 is now available. Brought to you by the Invasive Species Early Detection Program and Weed Watchers, this newsletter has the latest on invasive plants in the Bay Area. Everlasting pea History through Architecture and Agriculture John Muir National Historic Site is one of the landscapes intimately associated with the life of John Muir, the conservationist and national park advocate who lived at this farm for decades until his death in 1914. The property contains a large Italianate house, orchards, and an adobe house. Muir became business partners with settler John Strentzel in the 1880s and helped to manage and develop the already-successful farm. Today, the park is actively restoring the orchards. A wagon stands in a sunny field of peach trees, packed by tall palms. 2019 Early Detection Newsletter Now Available The 2019 issue of Early Detection News is now available. Brought to you by the Invasive Species Early Detection (ISED) Program, this newsletter has the latest on invasive plants in the Bay Area. In 2019, surveys took place between March and October at Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Point Reyes National Seashore, John Muir National Historic Site, and Pinnacles National Park. Patch of tall grass next to a bear bin and fire pit at a campground. Find Your Park 2019 ad campaign starts with parks in NYC and San Francisco In the fall of 2019, the National Park Foundation rolled out new ads in San Francisco and New York for the Find Your Park campaign. From September 23 through October 28, a series of digital and static outdoor ads appeared in bus shelters, billboards, and other spaces in the city of New York and San Francisco. display ads featuring John Muir National Historic Site Southwest National Parks Climate Roundtable Webinar Recording Now Available Following the publication of the Fourth National Climate Assessment Volume II: Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United States (NCA4), the National Park Service began hosting a series of roundtable webinars to convey relevant findings to national parks. Each roundtable covers one of the 10 geographic regions defined in the report. This month, they hosted their seventh regional installment, the Southwest Parks NCA4 Roundtable. Fourth National Climate Assessment: What Does it Mean for National Parks in the Southwest Region? Water Quality Monitoring in the San Francisco Bay Area Freshwater quality affects people’s enjoyment of San Francisco Bay Area national park resources, and plays a direct role in the health of aquatic habitats. In 2006, the National Park Service began monitoring freshwater quality under a long-term monitoring plan developed for Golden Gate National Recreation Area, John Muir National Historic Site, Muir Woods National Monument, Pinnacles National Park, and Point Reyes National Seashore. Rocky creek with flowing water. New Project Underway to Study Threatened Snake at John Muir National Historic Site This fall, the Natural Resources Management Team at John Muir National Historic Site initiated a survey of the Alameda whipsnake. Alameda whipsnakes are a sub-species of the California whipsnake that is only found in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area. Two funnel traps arranged at the end of a plywood Check Out the New San Francisco Bay Area Inventory and Monitoring Network Website The San Francisco Bay Area Inventory and Monitoring Network website is now fully updated! The new website features a modern look and feel, is fully accessible, mobile friendly, and makes it easier to find and share information. Partial screenshot of a new webpage on the new San Francisco Bay Area Network website Invasive Plant Species Priority Lists Read about how the Early Detection Team prioritizes removal of different invasive plants. Malfurada. Alameda Whipsnake: A Slithery Tail Continues… The Natural Resource Management team at John Muir National Historic Site has been working with The Wildlife Project to conduct a survey of the threatened Alameda whipsnake. Their goal is to help determine the occurrence and relative abundance of the snakes within the park. Survey efforts thus far show that there are surprisingly large populations of Alameda whipsnakes on Mt. Wanda. Adult Alameda whipsnake with a blue mark behind its head, about to slither away July 2018 Early Detection Newsletter Available The July 2018 issue of Early Detection News is now available. Brought to you by the Invasive Species Early Detection (ISED) Program, this newsletter has the latest on invasive plants in the Bay Area. Get the highlights here. Deeply lobed leaves of poroporo branching off from a dark purplish stem Early Detection News - August 2017 The Invasive Plant Species Early Detection Monitoring team completed surveys for the 2017 field season in the San Francisco Bay Area. Several noteworthy species were detected this month including the spiny plumeless thistle, poroporo, black locust, common cocklebur, and stinkwort. Red flower of the red amaranth Plant Community Monitoring in the San Francisco Bay Area Plant communities create essential habitat for plants and animals. While several National Park Service projects have included limited forms of vegetation sampling for some time, a recently updated protocol guides comprehensive, long-term plant community monitoring. Coastal dune vegetation on a hillside at Point Reyes National Seashore Invasive Plant Early Detection in the San Francisco Bay Area Invasive plants can dramatically alter ecosystems and reduce the amount of habitat available for native plant and animal species. The San Francisco Bay Area Inventory and Monitoring Network has developed an invasive plant early detection protocol to prioritize, find, and map invasive plants at Golden Gate National Recreation Area, Point Reyes National Seashore, Pinnacles National Park, and John Muir National Historic Site. The yellow flowers of invasive creeping capeweed in the Marin Headlands Oak Tree Deaths at John Muir NHS Under Investigation Numerous reports of fallen oak trees on Mt. Wanda at the John Muir National Historic Site over the past few years have led park biologists to question if the rate of tree mortality is increasing at the site, and if so why. Person recording data alongside a fallen oak tree National Park Getaway: John Muir National Historic Site This year is the centennial anniversary of the National Park Service - celebrate by visiting the place where the idea for the National Park Service began! Stop by the John Muir National Historic Site and visit the home of prominent naturalist and writer John Muir in Martinez, California. a tall white house Early Detection News – July 2018 The Invasive Species Early Detection Team (ISED) conducted July surveys at Point Reyes National Seashore and John Muir National Historic Site. Noteworthy detections this month included yellow star thistle, small leaf spiderwort, mourningbride, and poroporo. Yellow star thistle. Community Science Update: 2020 San Francisco Bay Area City Nature Challenge Recap 2020 looked a little different for the City Nature Challenge, an annual community science event. The event encourages urban areas around the world to turn out the greatest number of naturalists, make the most nature observations, and find the most species. In previous years, people have traveled to parks to find nature and make observations. But given local shelter-in-place restrictions, organizers decided on a different strategy. Bee visiting a flower. Birds at John Muir National Historic Site As part of national efforts to inventory vertebrates and vascular plants and conduct long-term monitoring of critical natural resources, the National Park Service conducted bird surveys at Mt. Wanda of John Muir National Historic Site. The goal was to develop a comprehensive list of birds present at the park, especially during the peak breeding season, to help inform park management activities. Dark-eyed juncos perch in a tree at John Muir National Historic Site. Scientist Profile: Denise Amador, Biological Science Technician As part of a larger effort to highlight women who do science in national parks, we are featuring Denise Amador, biological science technician for John Muir National Historic Site. How does an anthropology major get to be a biological science technician within two years of graduating, you might ask? Read Denise’s story to find out! Selfie of biological science technician Denise Amador with red plant in her face. Preserving a "Big Tree" On one of John Muir's many journeys to the Sierra Nevada mountains, as the story goes, he wrapped a small giant sequoia in a moistened handkerchief and brought it down from its high mountain grove to his home. When a fungus affected the giant sequoia, the NPS took steps to clone the tree. While logging no longer poses the same threat, the cloned saplings and their high mountain relatives continue to face new challenges in the ever changing conditions of our environment. An Italianate mansion is surrounded by orchards. A wooden enclosure at an intersection is marked John Muir National Historic Site Cultural Landscape The John Muir National Historic Site consists of the remaining 336 acres of the Strentzel-Muir fruit ranch and is comprised of the Muir House, Gravesite, and Mt. Wanda, located near Martinez, CA. The landscape is significant for its association with John Muir, its connection to the Conservation Movement, and the Victorian Italianate architecture of the main house. The fertile soil and climate of the Alhambra Valley supported agricultural pursuits during the historic period. Muir House Alameda Whipsnake: Caught Speeding on Mt. Wanda, Sporting Yellow Racing Stripes The Natural Resource Management team at John Muir National Historic Site is continuing its multi-year effort surveying for populations of the Alameda whipsnake, which occurs within the park on Mt. Wanda. Also known as a striped-racer, the Alameda whipsnake has been a federally listed species since 1997. Black and yellow-striped adult Alameda whipsnake held by a rubber-gloved hand. Scientist Profile: Angie Pincetich, Hydrologic Technician As part of the International Day of Women & Girls in Science, the San Francisco Bay Area National Parks are highlighting the contributions and accomplishments of several dynamic women who do science in the parks by sharing their personal stories. First up is Angie Pincetech, Hydrologic Technician for the San Francisco Bay Area Network. Learn about what inspires Angie most, and what her path has been in the sciences and with the parks. Angie Pincetech, NPS Hydrologic Technician, smiles by a creek at Muir Beach Alameda Whipsnake: Monitoring Continues for Contra Costa County’s Speedster This spring, the natural resource management team at John Muir National Historic Site continued their multi-year effort to monitor resident populations of the federally threatened Alameda whipsnake. Due to COVID-19 and shelter-in-place orders, they delayed their trapping efforts between 14-21 days and may have captured fewer whipsnakes as a result. Still, the team still encountered a familiar capture pattern. Slender, black and yellow-striped snake among lichen-covered shrub branches. Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Early Detection News - 2019 The Invasive Species Early Detection Team (ISED) conducted surveys in 2019 at Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GOGA), Point Reyes National Seashore(PORE), John Muir National Historic Site (JOMU), and Pinnacles National Park (PINN). Noteworthy detections this year included yellow star thistle and purple star thistle at GOGA, poroporo and Jimson weed at PORE, cheat grass and smilo grass at PINN, and stinkwort at JOMU. A clump of green grass (cheat grass) laying on the ground Scientist Profile: Alex Iwaki, Hydrology Monitor "While I was in college, I didn't want to go back home for the summer to work at the local grocery. I applied for a bunch of environmental internships and got a fisheries internship in Colorado. I had no prior experience or any interest in fish, but I thought 'why not?' I went out there, learned a lot, and had an amazing time. After the fisheries internship, I knew I wanted to continue to work in natural sciences." Alex Iwaki Top Ten Tips for a Summer Visit to John Muir National Historic Site The Strentzel/Muir home at the John Muir National Historic Site, in Martinez, California. A two-store home sits on a small hill, surrounded by tree. Two Palm Trees tower above the porch. From Intern to Mentor: A Latino Heritage Internship Program Intern's Conversation with an Alum David Escobar, a Latino Heritage Internship Program (LHIP) intern at John Muir National Historic Site in California, shares his conversation with a park ranger LHIP alum that shaped his experience, perspective, and project. A park ranger and David Escobar standing next to a sign San Francisco Bay Area Network 2019 Long-term Monitoring Updates The San Francisco Bay Area Inventory & Monitoring Network has created a new product for sharing our science with the Bay Area parks community: an immersive, multimedia StoryMap! Discover key highlights from the 2019 monitoring season along with striking photos, interactive maps, annotated graphs, audio recordings, and more. Person sitting among ferns beside an enormous tree, recording owl data. Threatened Alameda Whipsnake More Flexible in Habitat Use Than Previously Thought The threatened Alameda whipsnake is generally thought to prefer habitat with chaparral or scrub plant communities. So when park scientists found Alameda whipsnakes in unexpected places at John Muir National Historic site, they realized that the snake may be using a broader range of habitats than previously thought. Their results could have significant implications for habitat management not only at John Muir, but across the snake's range. Image of snake with vertical black and yellow stripes stretching between branches of Oak trees.

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