by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Joshua Tree

National Park - California

Joshua Tree National Park is a vast protected area in southern California. It's characterized by rugged rock formations and stark desert landscapes. Named for the region’s twisted, bristled Joshua trees, the park straddles the cactus-dotted Colorado Desert and the Mojave Desert, which is higher and cooler. Keys View looks out over the Coachella Valley. Hiking trails weave through the boulders of Hidden Valley.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Black Rock Canyon in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Black Rock Canyon

Detail map of Black Rock Canyon in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Cottonwood in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Cottonwood

Detail map of Cottonwood in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Covington Flats in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Covington Flats

Detail map of Covington Flats in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of the Geology Tour in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Geology Tour

Detail map of the Geology Tour in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Keys West in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Keys West

Detail map of Keys West in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of the North Entrance area in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - North Entrance

Detail map of the North Entrance area in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Pine City in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Pine City

Detail map of Pine City in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Pleasant Valley in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Pleasant Valley

Detail map of Pleasant Valley in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail map of Turkey Flats in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Joshua Tree - Turkey Flats

Detail map of Turkey Flats in Joshua Tree National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/jotr https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joshua_Tree_National_Park Joshua Tree National Park is a vast protected area in southern California. It's characterized by rugged rock formations and stark desert landscapes. Named for the region’s twisted, bristled Joshua trees, the park straddles the cactus-dotted Colorado Desert and the Mojave Desert, which is higher and cooler. Keys View looks out over the Coachella Valley. Hiking trails weave through the boulders of Hidden Valley. Two distinct desert ecosystems, the Mojave and the Colorado, come together in Joshua Tree National Park. A fascinating variety of plants and animals make their homes in a land sculpted by strong winds and occasional torrents of rain. Dark night skies, a rich cultural history, and surreal geologic features add to the wonder of this vast wilderness in southern California. Come explore for yourself. From I-10, take exit 117 for CA Hwy 62 toward 29 Palms/Yucca Valley. This will allow you to access the West Entrance, the North Entrance, Black Rock, and Indian Cove. Take exit 168 off I-10 to come in at the park's South Entrance. Black Rock Nature Center Located in the heart of beautiful Black Rock Campground. Bookstore, water, flush toilets, picnic area. From CA Hwy 62 (the Twentynine Palms Hwy), turn south onto Joshua Lane or Avalon Avenue. Continue for about 5 miles, following signs to Black Rock. Cottonwood Visitor Center Near the South Entrance to Joshua Tree National Park. Exhibits, bookstore, water, and flush toilets onsite. Picnic area nearby. From I-10, take exit 168 for the Cottonwood Springs Rd. Enter Joshua Tree National Park at the South Entrance. Continue Cottonwood Springs Rd. for about 6 miles. Cottonwood Visitor Center will be on your right. Joshua Tree Visitor Center The first stop for park visitors headed towards the West Entrance. Located in the village of Joshua Tree on Park Blvd. just south of Hwy 62. Exhibits, bookstore, cafe, flush toilets onsite; public telephone and showers nearby. From CA Hwy 62 (the Twentynine Palms Highway) in downtown Joshua Tree, turn south onto Park Blvd. The Joshua Tree Visitor Center will be on your right. Oasis Visitor Center Located at the Oasis of Mara in Twentynine Palms. Exhibits, bookstore, water, flush toilets, picnic tables. From CA Hwy 62 (the Twentynine Palms Highway), turn south onto National Park Drive or Utah Trail. Parking for the Oasis Visitor Center is on the right near the intersection of National Park Drive and Utah Trail. Belle Campground This small (18 site) campground is at an elevation of 3,800 ft (1,158 m). First-come, first-served. Pit toilets. No water so bring plenty of your own. Belle is a great campground to see dark night skies. Campsite Fee 15.00 Campsites must be pre-paid at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Campsite Fee 7.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be pre-paid at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Belle Campground Information Board Belle Campground information board is shown in front of a trail and a Joshua tree. Located off Pinto Basin Road in the northern end of the park. Belle has 18 campsites. Belle Campsite A campground with a picnic table, a grill and a Joshua tree. Belle Campground offers great view to the west - making it a great place to watch the sunset. Belle Campground View Under a large rock in the distance you can see a pit toilet and road. Belle Campground offers great view to the west - making it a great place to watch the sunset. Facility at Belle Campground A paved path leads to a vault toilet. Belle has vault toilets and no running water. Campsite at Belle A post with the number "15". In the background, a picnic table and charcoal grill are in a campsite. There are 18 sites at Belle Campground. Campsites are surrounded by large boulders. Black Rock Campground This large (99 site) campground is located in the northwest corner of the park. Each campsite has a picnic table and fire ring with rest rooms and water nearby. Shopping facilities are only five miles away in the town of Yucca Valley. Campsites vary in size and can accommodate both tents and RVs. A day-use picnic area and a dump station are also available. For horse owners, a separate area is provided for camping or for staging a ride. Campsite 25.00 Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. The cost is $20 for tents, RVs, and equestrian sites. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Black Rock Horse Site 20.00 Black Rock Horse Camp is open all year and has 20 sites. Reservations are required. For reservations, call 1-877-444-6777. Senior/Access Pass Campsite 12.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Black Rock Horse Campsite 10.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Black Rock Horse Camp is open all year and has 20 sites. Reservations are required. For reservations, call 1-877-444-6777. Black Rock Campground Entrance A road leads past a sign that says "Black Rock Canyon Campground" Black Rock is one of the largest campgrounds in the park and is surrounded by a large concentration of Joshua Trees. Black Rock Campground and Visitor Center Parking Lot A small parking lot with cars and a building. The campground has a small nature center open October through May. Campers register and pay camping fees at the nature center located in the middle of the campground. The staff at this small visitor center will help you plan a hike or other activity. Black Rock Campsite A tent is next to a Joshua Tree in a campsite. Currently 99 sites are available at Black Rock Campground. Black Rock Campground Bathrooms A building is surrounded by Joshua trees. The Black Rock Campgrounds is one of the few that has running water and flush toilets. Campsite on the east side of the Black Rock Campground. A Joshua Tree, tent and two chairs are around a fire pit. There are 99 campsites at Black Rock. Cottonwood Campground The Cottonwood Campground is reservations only during the busy season (September-May) and has 62 sites, potable water and flush toilets. The Campground is near the Cottonwood Visitor Center in the southeast part of the park. The closest metropolitan area is Indio about 30 miles away. Campsite Fee 25.00 Individual Campsite Fee. Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Group Campsite Fee 40.00 There are three group campsites. Cost is $35-40 depending on site capacity. Tents only. RVs and habitable trailers prohibited. Senior/Access Pass Campsite Fee 12.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Group Campsite Fee 20.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. There are three group campsites. Cost is $17.50-20 depending on site capacity. Tents only. RVs and habitable trailers prohibited. Cottonwood Campground A view looking down onto the Cottonwood Campground showing the bathrooms, tent sites and RV sites. Cottonwood campground has individual and groups sites, including an amphitheater for evening ranger programs. Campsite at Cottonwood Campground A picnic table in a campsite is next to a road. The landscape around Cottonwood is that of the Colorado Desert, which encompasses the southern edge of the park and a large portion of Southern California. Cottonwood Campground Amphitheater Rows of seats are in front of an outdoor stage. Cottonwood campground has individual and groups sites, including an amphitheater for evening ranger programs. Campsite at Cottonwood Campground A campsite with a picnic table and fire pit. Cottonwood Campground is one of the best places in Joshua Tree National Park for stargazing and wildflower viewing. Located in the southern park of the park at lower elevation, it has little shade from vegetation. Facilities at Cottonwood Campground A small building with two doors and a circular sign that says "women" The Cottonwood Campground has running water and flush toilets. Hidden Valley Campground The Hidden Valley Campground has 44 sites, pit toilets and no water. The campground is located along park boulevard and is surrounded by large boulders and Joshua Trees. All sites at Hidden Valley Campground are first-come, first-served. Camping fees must be pre-paid at an entrance station. Hidden Valley Campsite 15.00 Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Hidden Valley Campsite 7.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be pre-paid at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Hidden Valley Campground A pit toilet, information board, emergency phone and a path. Hidden Valley has 44 Campsites and is a popular campground. Campsite at Hidden Valley A tent, fire pit, picnic table are in a campsite surrounded by boulders. Campsites at Hidden Valley are surrounded by large boulder outcrops. Hidden Valley Campground Board A Campground Board in the foreground with a parking lot in the background. Hidden Valley has a medium sized parking lot. The Hidden Valley Campground area is a popular spot, especially for climbers. Hidden Valley Campsite and Climbing Two climbers are climbing on rocks behind a tent set up in a Hidden Valley Campsite. The Hidden Valley Campground is located in a popular climbing area. There are many climbing and bouldering routes right next to campsites. Hidden Valley Campground An RV is parked at a campsite in Hidden Valley. Both RVs and tents are allowed in Hidden Valley. RVs and trailers may not exceed a combined maximum length of 25 ft at Hidden Valley Campground. Indian Cove Campground Indian Cove Campground is located off of Highway 62, thirteen miles east of Joshua Tree Village and ten miles west of Twentynine Palms on the north side of the Wonderland of Rocks. Indian Cove Road dead-ends at this secluded area. Indian Cove has 101 campsites, including thirteen group campsites. Between Memorial Day and Labor Day it is 39 reservable sites. There are vault toilets but no water at the campsites. Water is available at the small ranger station roughly two miles north of the campground. Individual Campsite at Indian Cove 20.00 Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Group Campsite at Indian Cove 50.00 There are 13 Group Campsites at Indian Cove Campground. The cost is $35-50 depending on the site capactiy. These group sites can accommodate RVs or trailers, but maximum combined length can be no more than 25 feet. Senior/Access Pass Individual Campsite at Indian Cove 10.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Group Campsite at Indian Cove 25.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. There are 13 Group Campsites at Indian Cove Campground. The cost is $17.50-25 depending on the site capacity. These group sites can accommodate RVs or trailers, but maximum combined length can be no more than 25 feet. Indian Cove Entrance Station A sign that reads 'Joshua Tree National Park... Indian Cove'. Behind it is a building. The entrance station at Indian Cove Campground. You can pay the camping fee and get water here. Restrooms at Indian Cove A paved path leading to a small vault toilet. Indian Cove Campground has no running water around the campsites but there are vault toilets available. Indian Cove Campground Looking down on Indian Cove Campground with the road, a vault toilet and campsites. Indian Cove Campground lies amid the huge, steep rock formations for which Joshua Tree National Park is known. Amphitheater at Indian Cove Rows of seats and a stage surrounded by a large rock formation. Indian Cove has an amphitheater for ranger programs and talks. Indian Cove Group Campsite Several tents and picnic tables lit up in the evening in front of large rock formations. One of Indian Cove Campground's group sites. Jumbo Rocks Campground There are 124 individual/family sites in Jumbo Rocks Campground. Reservations are required during the busy season, September to May. The campground is centrally located and offers great views of rock formations. Jumbo Rocks Campsite 20.00 A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Jumbo Rocks Campsite 10.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Jumbo Rocks Information Board An RV drives past an campground information board. Jumbo Rocks accommodates both RVs and tent camping. There are 124 individual/family sites in this campground. All are first come, first served. Jumbo Rocks Campsite A picnic table and fire pit are in a campsite surrounded by boulders and some vegetation. There are 124 individual/family sites in this campground. All are first come, first served. View from Jumbo Rocks Campground A landscape photograph of rocky outcrops and vegetation. Jumbo Rocks Campground is located in a large boulder field. Skull Rock Nature Trail loops near the campground, leading visitors among the rock features and native plants. Jumbo Rocks Amphitheater Rows of seats are in front of a stage. Behind the stage are large rock formations. Jumbo Rocks Campground has an amphitheater for ranger programs. Jumbo Rocks Campsite and Facilities A campsite with a parking space in front is next to a restroom. Site 122 in Jumbo Rocks Campground is wheelchair accessible. Ryan Campground Ryan Campground has 31 campsites. All campsites are reservation only. The campground is centrally located in the park and is adjacent to the California Riding and Hiking Trail. There are 4 designated equestrian sites and reservations are required. For more equestrian campsites, see Black Rock Campground. There is no water available at Ryan Campground. There are 3 bicycle sites available at $5 per night, with no more than 3 tents and 3 people per campsite. Ryan Individual Campsite 20.00 Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Ryan Horse Site 15.00 Reservations are required for horse campsites. There are 4 horse sites available. Ryan Bicycle Sites 5.00 Sites 32A, 32B and 32C are for bicyclist, first-come, first-served. They are $5 per person, per night. Three people max and no parking for support vehicles. Senior/Access Pass Ryan Individual Campsite 10.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be paid within one hour of selecting a campsite. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Ryan Horse Site 7.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Reservations are required for horse campsites. There are 4 horse sites available Senior/Access Pass Ryan Bicycle Campsite 2.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Sites 32A, 32B and 32C are for bicyclist, first-come, first-served. They are $5 per person, per night. Three people max and no parking for support vehicles. Ryan Campground Entrance An unpaved road and campground signage is surrounded by vegetation and rock formations. Ryan Campground has 31 sites including 4 equestrian sites. Ryan Campground Facilities A small wheel chair accessible vault toilet and parking space. Ryan Campground has vault toilets and no water. Ryan Campsite Two tents, a picnic table, fire ring, and Joshua tree are in a campsite. There are 31 campsites at this centrally located campground. Mt. Ryan and Cap Rock are close by attractions. Ryan Campground Horse Camp A sign that reads "Horse Camp". Ryan Campground has 4 equestrian campsites. Reservations for equestrian sites are required. Campsite at Ryan Campground A tent and picnic table are surrounded by a large rock outcrop and vegetation. There are 31 campsites at Ryan Campground. Nearby attractions include Ryan Mountain and Cap Rock. Sheep Pass Group Campground Sheep Pass Group Campground has 6 group campsites and is centrally located within Joshua Tree National Park and is easily accessible to hiking trails and rock climbing routes. All campsites are by reservation only. It is one of three group campgrounds in the park. Towering rock formations and uniquely-shaped Joshua trees surround the facility. There is no water available in the campground. Group Campsite at Sheep Pass 50.00 Sheep Pass has 6 campsites that range in price from $35-50 depending on site capacity. Tents only. RVs and habitable trailers prohibited. Senior/Access Pass Group Campsite at Sheep Pass 25.00 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Sheep Pass has 6 campsites that range in price from $17.50-25 depending on site capacity. Tents only. RVs and habitable trailers prohibited. Sheep Pass Group Campground Two informational boards at the sheep pass group campground with large rocky outcrops behind them. Sheep Pass Group Campground is centrally located within Joshua Tree National Park and has easy access to hiking trails and rock climbing routes. Campsite at Sheep Pass Group Campground A sign that reads "Group Site 4". Behind are three picnic tables, a fire ring and a fire grate. Sheep Pass is one of three group campgrounds in the park. Facilities at Sheep Pass Group Campground An dirt road and a small paved walking path lead to a vault toilet. Sheep Pass has some amenities including vault toilets, picnic tables and fire rings. There is no water, cell service or a store of any kind at the campground. Sheep Pass Group Campground A landscape view of the campground with a campsite, tents, a parking lot, and a dirt road in view. Towering rock formations and uniquely-shaped Joshua trees surround Sheep Pass Campground. Sheep Pass Campsite A campsite with picnic tables and surrounded by large rocky formations. The campground is surrounded by towering rock formations. White Tank Campground Located off Pinto Basin Road in the northern end of the park, White Tank Campground is nestled among immense granite boulders. All campsites are first-come, first-served. RVs and trailers may not exceed a combined maximum length of 25 feet. There is no water available, bring plenty. White Tank has excellent night sky viewing and is located near the darkest section of the park. Individual Campsite at White Tank 15.00 Campsites at White Tank are $15. Camping fees must be pre-paid ahead of time at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. Senior/Access Pass Individual Campsite at White Tank 7.50 Nightly camping fee for one site for a camper with a Senior or Access pass. Camping fees must be pre-paid at an entrance station. A maximum of six people, three tents, and two cars may occupy an individual campsite, only if there is space available. Some sites only have enough parking for one vehicle. White Tank Campsite A picnic table and fire pit are in a campsite. Behind them are large boulders. White Tank Campground is nestled among immense granite boulders. The Arch Rock Nature Trail is located here - leading to a spectacular formation. White Tank Two cars are in a small, unpaved parking lot. White tank has 15 sites and limited parking. Campsite at White Tank A picnic table and fire ring are in a campsite that has a view looking out on a boulder field. The view from White Tank looks out over a large boulder field of granitic rock making it a popular campground. Campsite in White Tank Campground A picnic table and fire ring are in a campsite adjacent to a large boulder. There are 15 campsites in White Tank Campground and they are surrounded by boulders. Quail Springs Area at Sunset The sky turns hues of pink and purple over a field of Joshua trees. Quail Springs area at sunset Hidden Valley Hiker hiker looks over Hidden Valley Scrambling to the top of boulders in Joshua Tree can get you a great view. Historic Keys Ranch an historic wood house seen through the missing windshield of an old, rusty vehicle The historic Keys Ranch can be visited only on a ranger-guided tour. Lost Horse Valley Joshua trees grow on a flat plain with boulder outcrops and mountains in the distance Take in views of the park's iconic Joshua trees and rock outcrops in Lost Horse Valley. Joshua Tree Junior Ranger a little girl smiles while wearing a Jr. Ranger hat and badge Kids of all ages can take part in Joshua Tree National Park's Junior Ranger program. Joshua Tree Sunset a fiery sky behind the silhouette of a Joshua tree The wide-open desert of Joshua Tree National Park makes for stunning sunsets. Jumbo Rocks at Sunset people climbing on boulders are silhouetted against a colorful sunset sky Jumbo Rocks Campground is a fun place to explore the park's bouldered landscape. Stars Over the Park Entrance night scene showing stars of the Milky Way over a sign saying "Entering Joshua Tree National Park" Enjoy some of the darkest night skies in Southern California. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Joshua Tree National Park, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] rocks and people silhouetted at sunset Fossils in Joshua Tree National parks are special lands that are designated to permanently protect things that are part of our collective heritage like stunning views, unique wildlife, endangered species, areas of recreation, and wilderness. Seventeen national parks in the United States were created partly to protect the fossils found in them. Joshua Tree National Park is one of these! Scientists kneel in the dirt to excavate a mammoth tusk. Homesteaders From 1863 to 1976, United States citizens could claim 160-acre parcels of surveyed lands from the Federal Government under the Homestead Act of 1862 —though not after 1936 in the area that became Joshua Tree National Monument. Claimants had three to five years to "prove up" on their property, which meant completing three criteria: building a small home, improving the land, and growing crops or raising stock and proving they had met the requires. Color photo of wagon wheels in a line at Keys Ranch. NPS / Hannah Schwalbe Lost Horse Mine Even before the California Gold Rush of 1849, prospectors were finding gold in southern California. As the take from the mines in the Sierras petered out, miners fanned out into the deserts. Here hot summers, scarce water, limited wood sources, and the difficulty and high cost of transporting equipment and provisions created a challenging environment in which to operate a mine. Color photo of the wooden structure of Lost Horse Mine against a blue sky. NPS / Kristi Rugg Matt Riley's Fatal Mistake It was 114 degrees (46° C) in the shade and the distance to the nearest spring was 25 miles (40 km) when Matt Riley and Henry Kitto set off on foot from the OK Mine at 9 am. They had one canteen of water between them. Color photo of Matt Riley's gravesite. NPS / Kurt Moses Oasis of Mara In deserts the presence of water, that rarest of desert commodities, allows life to flourish and provides an oasis for natural and human activity. The Oasis of Mara is a cornerstone of the Joshua Tree National Park story. Color photo of California fan palms with a rainbow behind. NPS / Brad Sutton Movies in Joshua Tree Many film and TV productions have taken place in and around Joshua Tree National Park. It is easy to understand why these deserts are a highly sought after filming destination. Color photo of desert landscape at sunset. NPS / Kurt Moses Cowboys of Joshua Tree Cattle grazed throughout the park from the 1870s until 1945. The grazing ratio was about one adult animal to 17 acres. Color photo of bright sunshine obscuring desert landscape. NPS / Brad Sutton Meet our Volunteers: Tom Crochetiere Learn more about Tom's experience as a volunteer at Joshua Tree National Park. Volunteer smiles at the camera. Veteran Story: Patrick Pilcher After a successful military and NPS career, Patrick Pilcher helps visitors connect with the Klondike Gold Rush as a volunteer. A man poses in a volunteer uniform by a door labeled "Klondike Gold Rush" Park Air Profiles - Joshua Tree National Park Air quality profile for Joshua Tree National Park. Gives specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Joshua Tree NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Joshua Tree NP. Joshua trees at sunset in Joshua Tree NP World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Ravens Are you outside? Look up, look around you, and if you don’t spot one immediately, wait a few minutes. Your chances of seeing a common raven, Corvus corax, are very good. These jet-black birds with glossy, iridescent feathers, chisel-shaped black bills, and wingspans of up to four feet are ubiquitous in the Mojave and Colorado deserts. Color photo of a jet black raven sitting atop a very spiky Mojave yucca plant. Tarantula Autumn provides a brief glimpse into the workings of nature in the desert. At no other time is the intimate connection between life and death represented so clearly. One of the species that best embodies this relationship between life and death is the desert tarantula, Aphonopelma iodium. Woman lying on her stomach holding a smartphone to take a photo of a desert tarantula crawling. Wind, earth, and fire: The impacts of anthropogenic air pollution on soils in Joshua Tree National Park Third in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Annual plant species fill the interspace of creosotebushes at Joshua Tree National Park Draw a Joshua tree The park namesake, the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia) is a member of the Agave family. The Joshua tree is a twisty and spiky tree that can seem otherworldly, like it popped out of a book! Follow this step-by-step drawing activity to create your own Joshua Tree. No two Joshua trees look alike, so you can make yours as wacky and creative as you want! Paintings of Joshua Trees propped up outside. From Rock to Small Talk People long ago shared messages by making pictures on rocks. Today we have many other ways that we can communicate. What ways do you share information with your family and friends? Three people start in front of rock art. Create your own Rock Formation Just like you can find shapes in the clouds, people in Joshua Tree find shapes in the giant rock formations. Learn about how rock formations and then create your own. A rock that looks like a giant skull. Create your own Constellation The night sky is a giant story book! People all over the world connect stars into patterns. Create your own constellation and write its story. A Joshua Tree under the night sky Desert Tortoise Activity The desert tortoise has been on the earth for 15 to 20 million years. Learn more about the desert tortoise and how you can help this endangered species. An upclose desert tortoise picture Design your own Adaptable Plant Adaptations are skills which help an animal or plant to survive in their environment. Design your own plant. A bat flying out of a cave Junior Ranger Pledge After you have completed your Junior Ranger Activities you can say the Junior Ranger Pledge! A Junior Ranger gets sworn in by a Park Ranger National Park Service Finds Success at Hiring Event The National Park Service Fire and Aviation Program participated in a hiring event sponsored by the Department of Interior. The special hiring event was held in Bakersfield, CA and was a collaboration of all four natural resource management bureaus to hire open wildland fire positions in 2020. Employees talk to potential job candidates in front of a large promotional panel. Women of the West Women's stories have sometimes been overlooked or actively covered up in historical narratives, especially those concerning westward expansion. But many women made empowered choices to go to (and stay in) the California desert. Two of these women, Frances Keys and Elizabeth Campbell, are especially prominent in Joshua Tree's history. historic photo of a group of people, three standing women and one seated man Keys Ranch Historic District Cultural Landscape The Keys Ranch Historic District is located approximately twenty miles from the park headquarters and visitor center in the town of Twentynine Palms. The landscape is comprised approximately 1,038 acres and contains a wide variety of features including a ranch house, ore milling facilities, ranching compounds, agricultural areas and five dams. Keys used the area primarily as a grazing area with limited agricultural use. Keys Ranch Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde Save Water: Live Like a Desert Native Water conservation is always important in the desert, but saving water is even more critical during the current period of historic drought in the state of California. We can learn about how to be water-wise by looking to the example of native desert species, which have evolved to cope with rains that are not only scarce but unpredictable. open desert landscape The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand Respiratory Disease Outbreak Among Bighorn Sheep in Joshua Tree National Park Bighorn sheep were once common in Southern California and Nevada, but after more than a century of impacts from disease, unregulated hunting, and habitat loss, their numbers were in sharp decline. Since the 1960s, cooperative efforts from state and federal agencies to rebuild the herds were paying off, but now a disease outbreak at Joshua Tree National Park may pose a major threat to the majestic animals. bighorn sheep lamb showing symptoms of disease, with adult bighorn nearby El Niño in a Time of Historic Drought Deserts, by definition, get scant rainfall. Add the effects of a record drought, and it's crucial that desert dwellers and visitors alike focus on conserving water ... even when El Niño brings rains to some parts of California. mud cracks Desert Bighorn Sheep: Connecting a Desert Landscape Desert bighorn sheep live on islands of mountain habitat and use surrounding desert for travel and food. These same desert areas contain a variety of human-made barriers that threaten the area’s individual bighorn herds. Researchers are collecting data that will provide telling information about how we can help support and protect bighorn populations across the Mojave Desert into the future. Up close bighorn sheep standing on top of a large rock. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Joshua Tree Virtual Junior Ranger Program By completing the following activities on a sheet of paper at home, you will learn about some of the cultural and natural wonders of Joshua Tree National Park and earn a Junior Ranger badge by mail! A Junior Ranger with their badge and hat. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting Joshua Tree National Park Visit Joshua Tree National Park like an expert! Check out these top ten tips before your vacation to the California desert. A park ranger jumping through the air, in the background is a field of Joshua trees.
Joshua Tree National Park National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The official newspaper February – May 2017 Spring Guide Brittlebush blooms on rocky slopes near Cottonwood Springs Oasis. NPS/Brad Sutton The Desert Unsung IT’S BEEN THIRTY YEARS SINCE THE BAND U2 RELEASED THE JOSHUA Tree in March 1987. It was this album that catapulted the four Irishmen to international stardom; it was this album that drew the curious eyes of a generation to the otherworldly landscapes of the Southern California desert. The iconic back cover photo by Anton Corbijn, showing the band standing near a lone Joshua tree, cemented the association between the park and the album—even though the picture was taken off Highway 190 near Death Valley, about 200 miles north of here. Desert, and roughly half of the park’s 792,510 acres lie in the hotter, drier, and lower-elevation Colorado Desert—a subsection of the Sonoran Desert. Many of the 2 million people who come to Joshua Tree National Park each year are specifically looking for Joshua trees. Something about the bizarre forms of these branching yuccas captures the imagination. There’s no denying the plants are charismatic and a highlight of a trip to the park. From the Turkey Flats backcountry board, for example, you can look across vast sweeps of undeveloped wilderness to the Coxcomb Mountains, 25 miles distant. Creosote bush and white bursage are the dominant shrubs growing in this huge basin. There isn’t a single Joshua tree in sight, but the Colorado Desert you’re standing in has charismatic trees of its own. One great way to round out your park visit is to make sure you spend time in both the Mojave and the Colorado Deserts. Even if you have only a short time in the park, head for the Pinto Basin and stop at one of the pullouts along the road. Step out of your car. Soak in the silence and admire the immensity of the vista before you. They aren’t the only highlight, though. VisitorsColorado Desert who travel through only the northwestern partMojave of Desert Transition Zone the park, where Joshua trees grow, are missing out: our namesake plants are found only in the Mojave Welcome to your park. I just wanted to take a moment and welcome you to Southern California’s national park. Joshua Tree is the iconic symbol of the Mojave Desert. This year you are joining millions of people from around the globe who will experience the diverse, inspiring scenery that stretches across the Dry washes are a great place to look for trees like Joshua Tree National Park ironwood, smoketree, and blue palo verde. Their seeds sprout after being tumbled and bounced with …continued on p. 10 park. As you discover the desert, I would encourage you to also explore the neighboring landscapes that are preserved Joshua Tree Visitor Center for your enjoyment and that of generations Oasis Visitor Center to come. In addition to our northern Black Rock Nature Center Mojave M N D R E A S F A U L T N A Ch ihu N D R E A AN A S F ah ua take some time to visit the millions of U L T CO LO RA DO D E ES RT Cottonwood Visitor Center acres of public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management and the US Forest Service. Our newest neighbor to the east—Sand to Snow National Monument—links Joshua Tree to the wild slopes of Mt. San Gorgonio. To the north, Mojave Trails National Monument interprets prehistoric cultures as well as SE n A TR S SI TI Colorado Desert N N A Sonoran and Death Valley National Park, please E N A V DE sister parks at Mojave National Preserve T O S Joshua Tree O JA E R SE ZO Great Basin A LE VE L Route 66. The Colorado Desert is a subsection of the larger Sonoran Desert (left). The transition zone between the Colorado and Mojave Deserts hosts a wealth of biological diversity and is home to species characteristic of both deserts (right). Living in the west, we are truly lucky to have so many wonderful natural and Visiting on the Wing Fragments of the Past Safety; Rules & Regulations … p. 2 Springtime brings visitors of all types to Joshua How can the fossilized bones of extinct Tree, including not just humans but also our animals and artifacts left by past people help Hiking Trails … p. 4 feathered friends. Find out why birds not us understand how climate change may typically found in the desert show up here every affect Joshua Tree’s future? Take a look at spring. Get tips on where to spot commonly how scientists use fossils to reconstruct past (and not so commonly) seen species. Whether environments, learn about the creatures who you’re completely new to birdwatching or are once roamed this landscape, and discover how Night Sky Almanac ... p. 10 an advanced birder, the park’s birds are sure the environment shapes plants, animals, and Weather Information ... p. 11 to catch your eye, as Park Ranger Beth Hudick humans. Brad Sutton digs into what we have explains on p. 8. discov
Joshua Tree Guide National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Joshua Tree National Park A planning guide for visitors to Joshua Tree National Park 2014 Photo by Stacy Manson At first glance, the desert seems lifeless and barren. However, a closer look reveals a landscape teeming with life, providing a home for hundreds of species. Joshua Tree National Park is comprised of two distinct desert environments the Mojave and the Colorado deserts. Joshua trees dwell in the higher elevations of the Mojave, while creosote bushes, cholla cactus, and ocotillo dominate the lower Colorado. A changing landscape greets you at every turn. Joshua tree forests intermingle with immense boulder outcroppings. Reminders of ancestral peoples combine with the remains of mining infrastructure and pioneer homes. On your journey through the park, examine the transitions you see, feel the struggles of survival in an unforgiving place, and discover the subtle beauty of the desert. Hello and Welcome to Joshua Tree National Park! Ocotillos in bloom. NPS Photo Experience Joshua Tree National Park Take a Drive Explore Park Boulevard and the Pinto Basin Road. Take the spur to Keys View for incredible panoramic views. A park map is located on pages 4 & 5. Get Active Take a hike, walk a nature trail, ride a bike, go rock-climbing. Opportunities to get your heart pumping are almost limitless. Trails are listed on page 5. Relax, Reflect, and Recharge Take a moment to disconnect from the outside world. Think about what brought you here and what this place means to you. Emergencies Call 909-383-5651, dial 911, or contact a park ranger. Cell phone coverage in the park is limited. Table of Contents Information Rock Formations Maps, Programs, & Hiking Camping & Trip Planning Backcountry Travel & Activities Black Rock Canyon 2-3 3 4 6 6-7 7 Visitor Center Hours Oasis Joshua Tree Cottonwood Black Rock Daily (except Fridays) Fridays 9 am – 5 pm 8 am – 5 pm 9 am – 4 pm October – May 8 am – 4 pm Noon – 8 pm It is our goal to ensure you have a safe and fulfilling experience when enjoying this unique landscape. The weather varies greatly with the seasons, so be prepared and always carry water. Please keep your distance from wildlife – the animals are wild. I have found through my work here that we all can find adventures, challenges, and unforgettable experiences while enjoying the park. It is my sincere hope that you have a safe, enjoyable, and memorable time during your visit to Joshua Tree National Park. joshua tree national park 74485 national park drive twentynine palms, ca 92277 Attend a Ranger Program Interested in learning more about Joshua Tree National Park? Join park rangers and volunteers who know it inside and out. Walks and programs listed on page 4. Visiting Joshua Tree National Park will provide you with an opportunity to experience an environment completely different from what you might ordinarily see – the uniqueness, diversity and grandeur of two desert ecosystems found in the “California Desert.” With close examination, you will find subtle and intense beauty like no other. Mark Butler, Superintendent Joshua Tree National Park Important Information Park Information getting to the park The park is located about 140 miles east of Los Angeles via I–10. Entrances to the park are located off CA HWY 62 (Twentynine Palms Highway), at the towns of Joshua Tree and Twentynine Palms. A third entrance is located about 25 miles east of Indio, via I–10. international visitors Park information is available at visitor centers and entrance stations in Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish. entrance fees Admission to the park is $15 per vehicle and is good for seven consecutive days. An annual Joshua Tree Pass may be purchased for $30 and a National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass, costs $80 (free to active US military). Both are good for 12 months. A Senior Pass may be purchased by any U.S. citizen 62 or older for $10, and it is good for life. For Your Safety food, lodging, services There are no concessions within the park. However, surrounding communities can fulfill most visitor needs. lost & found Report lost, and turn in found, items at any visitor center or ranger station. Lost articles will be returned if found. accessibility The nature trails at Bajada, Cap Rock, and the Oasis of Mara are accessible. Keys View is accessible and Site 122 at Jumbo Rocks Campground is wheelchair accessible. wildflowers Spring blooming periods vary with elevation, temperature, and the amount of moisture in the soil. You can find current information on the park website: www.nps.gov/jotr. visitor centers Oasis Visitor Center (9 am - 5 pm) is located in Twentynine Palms. Joshua Tree Visitor Center, (8 am - 5 pm) is located in Joshua Tree Village. Cottonwood Visitor Center (9 am - 4 pm) serves the southern entrance. Black Rock Nature Center (Monday to Thursday 8 am - 4 pm; Friday noon - 8 pm) is open Octobe

also available

National Parks
USFS NW