"Visitors and horses along Anza Trail" by NPS Photo , public domain

Juan Bautista de Anza

National Historic Trail - AZ,CA

The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail is a 1,210-mile (1,950 km) extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco. The Trail commemorates the 1775–1776 land route that Spanish commander Juan Bautista de Anza took from the Sonora y Sinaloa Province of New Spain in Colonial Mexico through to Las Californias Province. The goal of the 1775–1776 trip was to establish a mission and presidio on the San Francisco Bay. The trail was an attempt to ease the course of Spanish colonization of California by establishing a major land route north for many to follow.

location

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Santa Ana in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Santa Ana - 1947

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Santa Ana in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1953 USGS 1:250000 map of San Bernardino in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - San Bernardino - 1953

Vintage 1953 USGS 1:250000 map of San Bernardino in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

brochures

The Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail route across Iowa. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).NHT Auto Tour Guides - Iowa

The Mormon Pioneer National Historic Trail route across Iowa. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The National Historic Trail route from Western Missouri through Northeastern Kansas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).NHT Auto Tour Guides - Missouri and Kansas

The National Historic Trail route from Western Missouri through Northeastern Kansas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The National Historic Trail route from Nebraska through Northeastern Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).NHT Auto Tour Guides - Nebraska and Colorado

The National Historic Trail route from Nebraska through Northeastern Colorado. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The National Historic Trail route along the Snake River through Idaho. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).NHT Auto Tour Guides - Idaho

The National Historic Trail route along the Snake River through Idaho. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The National Historic Trail route across Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).NHT Auto Tour Guides - Wyoming

The National Historic Trail route across Wyoming. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The National Historic Trail route across Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).NHT Auto Tour Guides - Utah

The National Historic Trail route across Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

The National Historic Trail route across Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).NHT Auto Tour Guides - Nevada

The National Historic Trail route across Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/juba/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Bautista_de_Anza_National_Historic_Trail The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail is a 1,210-mile (1,950 km) extends from Nogales on the U.S.-Mexico border in Arizona, through the California desert and coastal areas in Southern California and the Central Coast region to San Francisco. The Trail commemorates the 1775–1776 land route that Spanish commander Juan Bautista de Anza took from the Sonora y Sinaloa Province of New Spain in Colonial Mexico through to Las Californias Province. The goal of the 1775–1776 trip was to establish a mission and presidio on the San Francisco Bay. The trail was an attempt to ease the course of Spanish colonization of California by establishing a major land route north for many to follow. "¡Vayan Subiendo!"("Everyone mount up!") was the rousing call from Juan Bautista de Anza. In 1775-76, he led some 240 men, women, and children on an epic journey to establish the first non-Native settlement at San Francisco Bay. Today, the 1,200-mile Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail connects history, culture, and outdoor recreation from Nogales, Arizona, to the San Francisco Bay Area. Details listed are for the Richmond, California administrative office of the Anza Trail (administrative office is not currently open to the public). The 1,210-mile Anza Trail connects historic, cultural, and recreation sites from Nogales, AZ, to the San Francisco Bay Area that reveal the legacy of our Spanish colonial heritage. Each site along the Anza Trail is managed independently. Contact individual sites for hours, directions, and other details. 1,200 Miles to Visit The 1,200-mile Anza Trail connects historic, cultural, and recreation sites from Nogales, AZ, to the San Francisco Bay Area that reveal the legacy of our Spanish colonial heritage. To learn more, visit http://www.nps.gov/juba. Each site along the Anza Trail is managed independently. Contact individual sites for hours, directions, and other details. Details listed are for the San Francisco administrative office of the Anza Trail. The 1,200-mile Anza Trail connects historic, cultural, and recreation sites from Nogales, AZ, to the San Francisco Bay Area that reveal the legacy of our Spanish colonial heritage. To learn more, visit http://www.nps.gov/juba. Each site along the Anza Trail is managed independently. Contact individual sites for hours, directions, and other details. Camping Along the Anza Trail The 1,200-mile Anza Trail connects historic, cultural, and recreation sites from Nogales, AZ, to the San Francisco Bay Area that reveal the legacy of our Spanish colonial heritage. To learn more, visit http://www.nps.gov/juba. Each site along the Anza Trail is managed independently. Contact individual sites for hours, directions, and other details. Anza Trail Logo Anza Trail Logo The Anza Trail is one of 30 National Scenic and Historic Trails Anza Trail at Presidio of San Francisco Anza Trail at the Presidio Annual events bring together descendants of the Anza Expedition of 1776. Remembering His Ancestors heritage event Annual events bring together descendants of the Anza Expedition of 1776. Trails & Rails trails & rails Anza Trail volunteers ride the Amtrak Coast Starlight to share about California's landscape and history. Campfire Program reenactors in costume Annual events bring together descendants of the Anza Expedition of 1776. Connecting the Dots: The Anza Trail in Sonora The Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail enters the US at Nogales, Arizona, beginning a 1200-mile stretch of historic trail through the deserts and mountains of Arizona and California. However, the origins of Anza expedition of 1775-76 are in Sonora, Mexico. The people on this historic journey were recruited from the mining towns and farmlands of Sonora and Sinaloa. Anza Trail staff had the opportunity to trace the trail in Mexico with host country partners. Four riders on horseback in front of a white church Corridos: Stories Told Through Song The corrido is a traditional Mexican song style that has evolved over the past 200 years in northern Mexico and the southwestern United States. Corridos are all about storytelling. They tell of battle victories (and loses), individuals taking on the establishment, the lives of great or notorious people, and – perhaps the most ancient type of story in human history – the epic journey. Learn about this enduring tradition and listen to a corrido about the Anza Expedition of 1776 A woodcut illustration of four people singing and a man playing guitar Women of the Pimería Alta-Cultural Preservation Women were not passive victims of colonization or the mission system. They resisted pressures to conform to European and Spanish cultural norms and worked to preserve their traditions, while choosing to incorporate those new things that they found beneficial. Historic photograph of an O'odham woman grinding grain. Women of the Pimería Alta-Cultural Exchange Indigenous women played important roles in mission communities by functioning as cultural brokers or mediators. They negotiated the many tensions that occurred as colonial and local indigenous societies blended. Historic photograph of an O'odham woman with a kiaha on her back, walking away. Women of the Pimería Alta-Gendered Violence Male honor or “machismo” played a big part in the Spanish conquest of the Pimería Alta. Machismo was often expressed through violence, especially against indigenous people, and particularly, women. Historic photograph of five O'odham people posed outside adobe house. Women of the Pimería Alta-Intersectional Bias Overlapping combinations of biases related to religion, race and gender meant that indigenous women had to face many intersectional layers of prejudice. These colonial European biases limited roles and opportunities of indigenous women. Historic casta painting depicting 16 racial groupings. 18th c., oil on canvas. Women of the Pimería Alta-Establishing Missions In the Pimería Alta, gender determined relationships and power in politics, economics, and social relationships. With the arrival of Spanish missionaries, O'odham women played an important role in navigating political and cultural interactions, especially in the initial establishment of Spanish missions. Historic lithograph of two O'odham women carrying baskets. Women of the Pimería Alta-Gender and Sex Sexual fluidity is as common to the historical record as it is today. O'odham and European conceptions of gender and sex sometimes clashed as missions entered the Pimería Alta. Learn about the sociocultural conceptions of gender and sex within O'odham society before colonization. Historic photograph of two O'odham women posed together. Circa 1881. Women of the Pimería Alta-Sickness and Health Native women played an integral in developing botanical, herbal, and medicinal knowledge in their communities. They continued to provide healing expertise in mission communities. Native women also suffered disproportionately from diseases introduced by European colonists. Learn more about their triumphs and struggles with disease and health here. Small white apothecary jar with green scroll pattern. Circa 1800 from Mexico. Women of the Pimería Alta-Symbolic Figures Women were key facilitators, both symbolically and literally, in political negotiations and diplomacy between O'odham and Yoeme communities and European missionaries. See how missionaries used female symbolism to get them through the doors of O'odham diplomacy and the roles that women played in the unfolding of colonization. Historic painting of the Virgen de Guadalupe with the Four Apparitions. Circa 1773. Oil on copper. Telling Tales Along Trails How do archeologists find past trade routes? Many times, we find items or trails left behind by previous travelers — like the Yuha Well and other sites along the historic trail. These routes have stories about who moved from place to place, and why. Artist's illustration of travelers on the Juan de Baptista trail Series: Women of the Pimería Alta Native women in the Pimería Alta were not passive victims of colonization or the mission system. They actively shaped the communities in which they lived and influenced the overall trajectory of colonial and mission life. An O'odham woman mealing corn. María Feliciana Arballo María Feliciana Arballo, a 25-year-old widow of Afro-Latina descent with two small children, was one of about forty women in the Anza expedition when it began its colonizing journey from Sonora, Mexico to Alta California (upper California) in 1775. Drawing of woman with shawl wrapped around her Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Trail Building along the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail in the Heart of the San Gabriel Valley text

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