"Wave breaking at Kaloko Fishpond" by NPS photo , public domain

Kaloko-Honokōhau

National Historical Park - Hawaiʻi

Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park is located in the Kona District on the Big island of Hawaiʻi in the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi. It includes the National Historic Landmarked archaeological site known as the Honokōhau Settlement. The park was established for the preservation, protection and interpretation of traditional native Hawaiian activities and culture.

maps

Official visitor map of Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park (NHP) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Kaloko-Honokōhau - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park (NHP) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail (NHT) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Ala Kahakai - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Ala Kahakai National Historic Trail (NHT) in Hawaiʻi. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Driving Map of the Island of Hawaiʻi (Hawaii). Published by the Hawaii Tourism Authority.Hawaiʻi - Driving Map

Driving Map of the Island of Hawaiʻi (Hawaii). Published by the Hawaii Tourism Authority.

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii North 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Hawaiʻi - Vintage USGS Map - Hawaii North 1951

Vintage map of Hawaiian Islands - Hawaii North 1951. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/kaho/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honok%C5%8Dhau_Settlement_and_Kaloko-Honok%C5%8Dhau_National_Historical_Park Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park is located in the Kona District on the Big island of Hawaiʻi in the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi. It includes the National Historic Landmarked archaeological site known as the Honokōhau Settlement. The park was established for the preservation, protection and interpretation of traditional native Hawaiian activities and culture. To survive in a hot and arid environment the native Hawaiians (kanaka maoli) used ancient fishing skills, including the building of fishponds, and the knowledge of the location of precious fresh water (wai) that flows into the many brackish pools throughout the park. The spirit of the people (poe) and the knowledge of the elders (kupuna) created a tradition of respect and reverence for this area. Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park is located on the west coast of the island of Hawai'i, approximately 3 miles south of the Keahole International Airport (Kailua-Kona AIrport) and 3 miles north of the town of Kailua-Kona, on the ocean side of Highway 19. The visitor center, Hale Ho'okipa, is located half a mile north of the entrance to Honokōhau Harbor. The Kaloko road gate is located across the highway from the Kaloko New Industrial Park (across from the big yellow "Kona Trade Center" building). Hale Ho'okipa Visitor Center Stop by to receive a park orientation at Hale Ho'okipa, the Park's Visitor Center and location of the Hawaii Pacific Parks Association Bookstore. Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park is located on the west coast of the island of Hawai'i, approximately 3 miles south of the Keahole International Airport (Kailua-Kona Airport) and 3 miles north of the town of Kailua-Kona, on the ocean side of Highway 19. The visitor center, Hale Ho'okipa, is located half a mile north of the entrance to Honokohau Harbor. The Kaloko road gate is located across the highway from the Kaloko New Industrial Park (across from the big yellow "Kona Trade Center" building). Kaloko Fishpond The rehabilitation of Kaloko fishpond started in 1998 and still continues today.... Kaloko Fishpond is the largest walled fishpond in the state (800 ft. long) Ai'opio fishtrap Honu (sea turtles) are common on the beach in this area of the park Ai'opio fishtrap is on the south boundary of the park and is used frequently by visitors and for special events (annual children's cultural festival shown). pu'uoina heiau wall construction Great skill was needed to build rock walls Kids working at station for Archeology game Hawaiian cultural festival Fourth graders at Park's Cultural Festival Plant activity for fourth graders at Park's Cultural Festival Learning from park staff about plants Fourth Graders learn about native plants at the park Hands in Craft Making Hawaiian objects The detail of a Hawaiian artist Entrance to Petroglyph Boardwalk Modern version of Ki'i Pohaku (Petroglyphs)! When you visit the Petroglyphs in the park you'll see this image in modern stone! Ho'okupu Offering Offering during the time of Makahiki Voices of Science: Fishponds at Kaloko-Honokōhau Native Hawaiians were some of the first fish-farmers in history. 800 years ago, they built large fishponds where they’d raise fish for the whole community. And nature provided, too. Naturally-formed fishponds dotted the coast of the Big Island of Hawaii. Today, Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park works hard to maintain these symbols of the past, to preserve them for our future. Waves crash against a massive sea wall Crystal Clear: Evaluating Potential Water Quality Changes in Hawaii Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park, on the west side of the island of Hawaii, was established in 1978 to preserve, interpret, and perpetuate traditional Native Hawaiian culture and activities. Vital to this mission are a variety of culturally and ecologically significant resources that are dependent on water. a pond separated from the ocean by a natural barrier. Climate Change Clues from Monitoring As climate changes, significant changes in weather conditions impact the natural environment by shifting patterns of precipitation, promoting extremes in storm behavior, and influencing bird migration, invasive species spread, coral reef decline, and much more. The Pacific Island Network (PACN) undertakes systematic long-term monitoring of a wide variety of natural resources to accurately determine if change is occurring and why. Precipitation seen over the lush valleys of Kalaupapa National Historical Park. Sea Level Rise & Anchialine Pools Anchialine pools are brackish coastal ecosystems without a surface connection to the ocean, where groundwater and ocean water (from underground) mix. In Hawai‘i, groundwater flows through these pools and out to wetlands and coral reefs making them valuable indicators of broad-scale groundwater recharge and contamination. An anchialine pool in Pu‘uhonua O Hōnaunau National Park Algae Grazers Help Clean Up How unique marine assemblages at Kalaupapa National Historical Park and Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park provide an excellent opportunity to study nutrient inputs into nearshore waters, and its influence on benthic communities and the associated fish assemblage. Red pencil sea urchin (Heterocentrotus mammillatus) NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park, Hawaii Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] waves breaking on stone wall Voices of Science: Coral Bleaching in the Pacific Coral bleaching is a global crisis. Warmer water temperatures cause corals to react by expelling algae, called zooxanthellae, leaving stark white corals in their wake. If corals stay bleached for too long, the whole reef could die. Our reefs are home to a wide variety of sea life, and to lose this biodiversity would be devastating. But reef biologists in Kaloko-Honokohau say there’s still time to help control the warming that’s underway. Coral and small fish under the water National Park Getaway: Kaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park Begin your adventure in Hawaiʻi, one of the most remote island chains in the world. You travelled here looking for new experiences–much like the first Polynesians, who set out from distant shores in the South Pacific and arrived in these islands. waves crashing over a stony shore Bird Beak Buffet Learn about birds, the importance of beak shape and size, and what type of food they eat with the fun, interactive activity! A Hawaiian Stilt and a Coot forage for food in ʻAimakapa Fishpond 2020 WORLDFEST FILM FESTIVAL WINNERS In 2020 Harpers Ferry Center (HFC) won eight awards at WorldFest Houston. Many of these can be viewed over the summer through our upcoming film festival in celebration of HFC’s 50th Anniversary. (Note: The Special Jury REMI Award is given for a ranking of A+ and recognizes the top films in each category.) Green trees grow in red dirt canyons unde a cloudy sky. Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Anchialine Pools Anchialine pools are unique aquatic ecosystems where water pools in the crevices and cracks of lava near shore. They are made up of brackish water - a mixture of fresh groundwater that comes from the rain on the mountain, filtered through porous lava rock and salt water that is linked to the ocean by subterranean tunnels. Water levels in the pools often fluctuate in response to ocean tides due to the coastal location and connection with the ocean. Anchialine Pool in the Park Plan like a Park Ranger Top 10 items to remember when visiting the park Lono pole for Makahiki Ceremonies

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