"Katmai Calder, glacier, and Mt Griggs" by NPS , public domain

Katmai

National Park & Preserve - Alaska

Katmai National Park and Preserve is on a peninsula in southern Alaska. Its wild landscapes span tundra, forests, lakes and mountains. The park is known for the many brown bears that are drawn to the abundant salmon in Brooks Falls. Lookout platforms at adjacent Brooks Camp offer close-up views of the bears. The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes is an area of lava flows and ash formed by a massive volcanic eruption.

maps

Official visitor map of Katmai National Park & Preserve (NP&PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Katmai - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Katmai National Park & Preserve (NP&PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Katmai National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Katmai - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Katmai National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Alagnak Wild River in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Alagnak - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Alagnak Wild River in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map sheet BCH-06 for the Becharof National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alaska. Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).Becharof NWR - BCH-06 2021

Map sheet BCH-06 for the Becharof National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alaska. Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map sheet BCH-05 for the Becharof National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alaska. Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).Becharof NWR - BCH-05 2021

Map sheet BCH-05 for the Becharof National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alaska. Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map sheet BCH-03 for the Becharof National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alaska. Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).Becharof NWR - BCH-03 2021

Map sheet BCH-03 for the Becharof National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alaska. Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

Map sheet BCH-01 for the Becharof National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alaska. Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).Becharof NWR - BCH-01 2021

Map sheet BCH-01 for the Becharof National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Alaska. Published by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

brochures

A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Alagnak, Aniakchak, Katmai - Guide 2021

A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River, Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, Katmai National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/katm/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katmai_National_Park_and_Preserve Katmai National Park and Preserve is on a peninsula in southern Alaska. Its wild landscapes span tundra, forests, lakes and mountains. The park is known for the many brown bears that are drawn to the abundant salmon in Brooks Falls. Lookout platforms at adjacent Brooks Camp offer close-up views of the bears. The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes is an area of lava flows and ash formed by a massive volcanic eruption. A landscape is alive underneath our feet, filled with creatures that remind us what it is to be wild. Katmai was established in 1918 to protect the volcanically devastated region surrounding Novarupta and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes. Today, Katmai National Park and Preserve also protects 9,000 years of human history and important habitat for salmon and thousands of brown bears. Katmai National Park & Preserve is located on the northern Alaska Peninsula, northwest of Kodiak Island and southwest of Homer, Alaska. The park’s headquarters is in King Salmon, about 290 air miles southwest of Anchorage. Unlike most national parks in the United States, Katmai is almost exclusively accessed by plane or boat. Brooks Camp Visitor Center The Brooks Camp Visitor Center, open June 1 – late September, is the point of entry for all visitors to Brooks Camp. A park ranger is on duty to provide information, campground check-in, mandatory bear etiquette and safety talks, and backcountry planning. An Alaska Geographic Association (AGA) bookstore offers books, maps, and other Katmai-related items. Brooks Camp is located on the northern Alaska Peninsula, about 30 miles east of King Salmon and about 290 air miles southwest of Anchorage. Unlike most national park visitor centers in the United States, Brooks Camp's visitor center is only accessible by plane or boat. King Salmon Visitor Center Located next door to the King Salmon Airport, the King Salmon Visitor Center provides information on the many federal public lands of Southwest Alaska, particularly those in the Bristol Bay area. A large collection of films is available for viewing and an Alaska Geographic bookstore sells maps, charts, videos, posters, clothing and more. **At this time, the Visitor Center will only be staffed through a walk-up window with limited services. This visitor center is located next to the passenger terminal at the King Salmon Airport. Robert F. Griggs Visitor Center The Robert F. Griggs Visitor Center overlooks the famous Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes and is the starting point of the Ukak Falls Trail. The posted hours are estimated because the visitor center is only open during ranger-led Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes tours. Located 23 miles from Brooks Camp on the only road within Katmai National Park & Preserve. Visitors can participate in a Ranger-led Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes Tour where this center is a lunch stop before hiking to the valley floor. Brooks Camp Campground Brooks Camp Campground is the only developed campground in Katmai National Park and Preserve. It is located on the shore of Naknek Lake, about .3 miles (.5 km) from the Brooks Camp Visitor Center. Facilities in the campground include a food cache, gear cache, fuel storage locker, potable water, cooking shelters, fire rings, and vault toilets. The campground is also surrounded by an electric fence. Special regulations apply at Brooks Camp and in the campground. Brooks Camp Campground Fees: June 1 through September 17 12.00 The Brooks Camp Campground costs $12 per person per night June 1 through September 17. America the Beautiful Access and Senior pass holders can enjoy 50% discounts on camping reservations. Please note that fees for this campground are charged per person, not per group. Access and Senior pass discounts only apply to the cardholder. Brooks Camp Campground Fees: May 1-31 and September 18-October 31 6.00 The Brooks Camp Campground costs $6 per person per night in May and September 18 through October 31. America the Beautiful Access and Senior pass holders can enjoy 50% discounts on camping reservations. Please note that fees for this campground are charged per person, not per group. Access and Senior pass discounts only apply to the cardholder. Brooks Camp Campground Fees November 1-April 30 0.00 No fee is charged to stay in the campground from November 1 to April 30. No potable water is available at this time and the electric fence is not maintained. Food and Gear Cache at Brooks Camp Campground building with two doors in forest Brooks Camp Campground has a centrally located building to store food and equipment. cooking shelter in Brooks Camp Campground Adirondack style shelter and fire grate Three shelters in Brooks Camp Campground are designated for eating and cooking. Tent in Brooks Camp Campground Tent in Brooks Camp Campground Brooks Camp Campground is located in a balsam poplar forest. Brooks Camp Campground electric fence gate electric fence with gate for entry Brooks Camp Campground is surrounded by an electric fence to deter bears. Trail to Brooks Camp Campground gravel trail through spruce and birch forest The Brooks Camp Campground is accessed by a narrow trail .3 miles (.5 km) north of the visitor center. Salmon jumping at Brooks Falls salmon jumping at waterfall Each year, 200,000 to 400,000 sockeye salmon jump Brooks Falls. Bear catching jumping salmon Bear standing at the edge of a waterfall while a salmon is leaping towards it. In July, brown bears often stand on the lip of Brooks Falls to try to catch leaping salmon. Bear family walks near sleeping bear Three bears walk near a sleeping bear Salmon streams in Katmai attract high numbers of brown bears. Mount Katmai caldera lake inside of an ash and glacier covered volcano Mount Katmai's summit collapsed during the 1912 Novarupta-Katmai eruption. Today, the caldera is filled with a deep lake. sedge meadows and volcanoes at Hallo meadow in foreground and snow capped volcanoes on the horizon Glacially clad volcanoes loom over the sedge meadows of Hallo Bay Lichen Biodiversity Read the abstract and get the link to an article published in Mycosphere: McCune B, ... Walton J. 2018. Biodiversity and ecology of lichens of Katmai and Lake Clark National Parks and Preserves, Alaska. Mycosphere 9(4):859–930, Doi 10.5943/mycosphere/9/4/10 A box of different lichens. Spatial Correlation of Archeaological Sites and Subsistence Resources in the Gulf of Alaska Discover how a GIS-based analysis of nearly 2,000 coastal archaeology sites demonstrates the strong correlation between seasonally-available marine food and human settlement around the Gulf of Alaska. map of southwest alaska Brooks River Cutbank Project Archeologists often try to stabilize sites to protect them from deterioration, but in many cases erosion cannot be stopped. In Katmai National Park & Preserve on the Alaska Peninsula, across from Kodiak Island, erosion exposed human remains at the Cutbank site. Archeologists and culturally affiliated Alaska Native groups worked together to develop a research design to address questions of mutual interest. They found some surprises. Excavating at Cutbank Southwest Alaska Network Lichen Inventory Southwest Alaska Network Lichen Inventory Subsistence The study of subsistence resources in parks has been a mix of long-term work and projects instigated by issues facing the Federal Subsistence Board. Winter hunting is an important subsistence activity in many Alaska communities and park areas. Science in Wilderness Marine Reserves ANILCA establishes the largest scientific laboratory...ever! A spawning salmon struggles to get back into the water. Bald Eagle Monitoring in Alaska Southwest Alaska's Inventory and Monitoring Network continues to improve bald eagle nest monitoring in NPS lands along the northern Gulf of Alaska. bald eagle flying with fish Monitoring Mussel Populations in Southwest Alaska Parks Mussel are an important food for many marine birds and mammals. Learn more about their populations in southwest Alaskan parks. monitoring mussel beds Tales from the Tides - FOR BIRD'S SAKES! (Science Stories for Kids!) Written for a young audience, this article describes the March 2018 Winter Marine Bird Survey off the coast of Katmai National Park and Preserve. Kids will learn why the research is important, will witness an amazing wildlife encounter experienced by the research team and discover what it's like to be a marine biologist in Alaska. Researchers on a skiff off the coast of Katmai Archeologists Excavate Alagnak Village At Katmai National Park & Preserve on the Alaska Peninsula, across from Kodiak Island, there is still much to learn about the history of ancient occupation along the Alagnak River. Archeological testing at a village site occupied between about 2300 and 1200 years ago reveals both details about village life and the need to monitor, evaluate, and respond to the erosional threats to this important place. Excavating at Katmai In Celebration of ANILCA Former President, Jimmy Carter, offers a sentimental introduction to the 25th Anniversary Edition of Alaska Park Science and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). Black and white photo of six white men standing in front of an old National Park Service Building. Morale, Welfare and Recreation in WWII National Parks Wartime NPS Director Newton Drury wrote 'In wartime, the best function of these areas is to prove a place to which members of the armed forces and civilians may retire to restore shattered nerves and to recuperate physically and mentally for the war tasks still ahead of them.' During World War II, parks across the United States supported the morale of troops and sought to become places of healing for those returning from war. B&W; soldiers post in front of large tree Cleaning Up Alaska's Beaches Cleanup crews hit the beaches in 5 of Alaska's coastal national parks in 2015 to collect, assess and ultimately remove abandoned and washed up trash. The massive endeavor was part of a larger project aimed at understanding the sources of marine debris and keeping it out of the ocean and off of Alaska's beaches. NPS staff and volunteers with bags of trash collected off beach. A History of Science in Alaska's National Parks National park units in Alaska precede the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. The first park unit, Sitka National Monument, was conceived in 1908, and by the mid-1920s four national monuments along with Alaska’s first national park were part of the growing park system. Discover how the early 1900s and observations of a few helped to establish the National Park Service in Alaska. Black and white photo of Arno Cammerer sitting at his desk looking through papers. Old is Getting Older In the last 25 years, persistent archaeological survey and improved scientific techniques have resulted in new data which confirms that Alaska sites are actually much earlier than we once believed. NPS archaeologist works at Amakomanak site in Noatak National Preserve. A Partnership to Remove Marine Debris from Alaskan Coastal Parks Marine debris can affect marine mammals and birds through entanglement, strangulation, and digestive blockage. In summer 2015, we conducted an extensive multi-partner project to remove over 11 tons of marine debris from remote beaches in five Alaska parks. park rangers putting trash into white plastic bags on a rocky beach An Overview of the Changing Tides Research Project Southwest Alaska’s coastal brown bears are the largest of their kind in the world, deriving much of their bulk from the abundant salmon resources that pulse into the rivers from the sea each summer. Bears also use intertidal resources such as clams and mussels. Along the shores of Lake Clark National Park and Preserve and Katmai National Park and Preserve, bears spend hours in the mudflats digging, chomping, slurping, and digging again. a brown bear pawing at a clam on a beach PARKS...IN...SPAAAACE!!! NASA astronauts have quite literally an out-of-this-world view of national parks and take some pretty stellar pictures to share. Travel along with the space station on its journey west to east getting the extreme bird’s eye view of national parks across the country. And one more down-to-earth. View of Denali National Park & Preserve from space Black-Capped Chickadee Black-capped chickadees and boreal chickadees are tiny but tough songbirds that are year-round residents in many parts of Alaska. Mussel Abundance in the Gulf of Alaska Read the abstract and get the link to a paer published in Oceanopgraphy. Bodkin, J. L., H. A. Coletti, B. E. Ballachey, D. H. Monson, D. Esler, and T. A. Dean. 2017. Variation in abundance of Pacific blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus) in the northern Gulf of Alaska, 2006-2015. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography. DOI: 10.1016/j. dsr2.2017.04.008. A cluster of mussels in the intetidal zone. Intertidal Mapping Using Unmanned Aircraft 2018 Resource brief on intertidal zone mapping in southwest Alaska using a small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS). A researcher operating a UAS along the coast. Changing Tides: April 2016 Recap The Changing Tides project is a three-year study examining the link between the marine and terrestrial environments, specifically between coastal brown bears, clams and mussels, and people. It is a cooperative project of the National Park Service, U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Sealife Center, and Washington State University. Preliminary data from the summer of 2015 creates more questions to study. A researcher looking through a scope on the beach. Tree Rings Reveal Drought Stress Read the abstract and get the link to the article published in Ecological Applications: Csank, A. Z., A. E. Miller, R. L. Sherriff, E. E. Berg, and J. M. Welker. 2016. Tree-ring isotopes reveal drought sensitivity in trees killed by spruce beetle outbreaks in southcentral Alaska. Ecological Applications 26:2001-2020. A researcher bores a core from a tree. Bristol Bay Canneries The Yup’ik, Alutiiq, and Dena’ina subsisted off the salmon runs in this area for 9,000 years. Bristol Bay had a high concentration of canneries due to this high volume of salmon. The Arctic Packing Company constructed the first saltery in Bristol Bay at Kahulik in 1883, and the competitive market created a culture than altered the region forever. Native Alaskan populations were exposed to disease, and overfishing threatened subsistence lifestyles of Dena’ina people upstream. Black and white photo: Boats move between chunks of ice floating on the water's surface Kukak Bay Cannery The Kukak Bay Cannery ruins are located in a glacially carved fjord. The historical archeological district in Katmai National Park & Preserve is surrounded by three hills and a rocky shoreline. The first cannery at the site was constructed in 1922 by the Hemrich Packing Company to can razor clams. In 1980, after the passing of Alaska National Lands Interest Conservation Act (ANILCA), this area of coastline was designated wilderness, ending further use as a cannery. View over the bow of a boat on water to a collection of buildings on the shore Volcanic Hazards in Alaska’s National Parks There are over 100 volcanoes in Alaska, 54 of which are considered historically active, and 14 are found in Alaska national parks, preserves, and monuments. The Alaska Volcano Observatory monitors and conducts research on volcanoes in Alaska in order to better understand volcanic processes and determine the likelihood of future volcanic hazards, with a primary goal of informing the public about volcanic hazards and impending volcanic activity. Alaska Park Science 18(1), 2019. A snow covered volcanic peak. Marine Bird and Mammal Surveys 2018 Resource brief about marine bird monitoring in Southwest Alaska parks. people in boat Aurora Borealis: A Brief Overview A brief overview of how Northern Lights occur. two ribbons of greenish light in a dark blue sky, over a very dark forest Practice Safe Bear Spray Use Proper behavior in bear country and understanding bear behavior can help to avoid dangerous situations for people and bears. Bear spray should be used as a last line of defense when dealing with bears- not immediately upon seeing one. This introduction will help cover bear behaviors as well as safe use of bear pepper spray. A black bear stands on a wooden bench. Small Mammals as Indicators of Climate, Biodiversity, and Ecosystem Change This is a time of rapid environmental changes in Alaska. Species that have evolved within tundra habitats over multiple glacial cycles are not only best adapted to high-latitude and high-elevation environments, but may also respond more slowly to change. Studies of small mammal communities could provide valuable insights to larger ecosystem changes. two marmots perched atop a large boulder NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Katmai National Park & Preserve, Alaska Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] mountain peak POET newsletter March 2013 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from March 2013. dock on beach Sea Star Wasting Disease in Southwest Alaska 2018 Resource brief update on sea star wasting disease in southwest Alaska parks. diseased sea star Sea Otter Monitoring in Southwest Alaska 2018 Resource brief on sea otter monitoring. Sea otters are known as a keystone species, and sea otters dramatically affect the structure and complexity of their environment. Sea otter populations and other nearshore components are monitored in southwest Alaskan parks. sea otter in water Black Oystercatcher Monitoring 2018 Resource brief with findings from black oystercatcher monitoring in southwest Alaska. black oystercatcher Growing Season Dynamics 2018 Resource brief of how growing season dynamics are changing in southwest Alaska. Two bear cubs play in a coastal meadow. Bat Projects in Parks: Alaska Region Parks Bats in Alaska? Find out! A scenic view of Alaska, mountains in the distance and a grizzly in front of a lake in the front. National Park Getaway: Katmai National Park & Preserve On the northern end of the Alaska Peninsula, there's a place with a moonscape caused by a cataclysmic volcanic eruption. There's a place where sockeye salmon decorate streams with their ruby red bodies during the spawn. There's a place where brown bears out number people. This same place has been a home to humans for 9,000 years: Katmai National Park and Preserve. Three large brown bears hunched in tall grass Winter Marine Bird Survey - Part II Part 2 of "When the Birding Gets Tough," a personal account of the 2018 Winter Marine Bird Survey in Katmai National Park and Preserve. Photo USFWS/L. Whitehouse Steller's eiders Winter Marine Bird Survey - Part I Part one of "When the Birding Gets Tough," a personal account of the 2018 Katmai Winter Marine Bird Survey as told by a newcomer to Alaska and the rigors of research in Alaska's capricious coastal areas. Emperor geese on a rock Water Quality Practitioner's Guide Read the abstract and find the link to the article published in Environmental Monitoring and Assessment: Sergeant, C. J., E. N. Starkey, K. K. Bartz, M. H. Wilson, and F. J. Mueter. 2016. A practitioner’s guide for exploring water quality patterns using Principal Components Analysis and Procrustes. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 188(4):1-15. Researchers collecting water quality data. Economics of Wilderness: Contribution of Alaska Parks and Wilderness to the Alaska Economy Looking ahead, it is clear that Alaska’s wilderness ecosystems will become increasingly valuable assets in a crowded urban world. If Alaska’s wild lands, wildlife, and ecological integrity are cared for with respect, the contribution of wilderness and conservation lands to the Alaska economy and to people everywhere will be significant, positive, increasing, and enduring. a large cruise ship on the ocean with snowy mountains in the distance The Great Eruption of 1912 Home of the largest volcanic eruption in the history of North America, Novarupta, The Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, and the Katmai volcanoes have been an open-air laboratory since shortly after the 1912 eruption. Volcanological studies here have shaped how geologists think about explosive eruptions and continue to provide insights into a wide range of aspects about how volcanoes work. aerial view of a crater lake in a snowy, mountainous landscape Water Quality in Southwest Alaska 2020 Resource brief on water quality monitoring conducted by the Southwest Alaska Network. Katmai and Lake Clark national parks and preserves were created, in part, to protect high-quality habitat for salmon. Cold water is a key habitat requirement, but exactly how cold depends on the salmon species, population, and life stage. A researcher collects water quality data. Air Quality in Southwest Alaska 2020 Resource Brief on air quality monitoring conducted in Katmai National Park and Preserve by the Southwest Alaska Network.High-elevation lakes are sensitive to the effects of nutrient enrichment and acidification from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur. Weather station at Katmai National Park and Preserve. Southwest Alaska Salt Marshes 2020 Resource brief on monitoring salt marshes in southwest Alaska. Coastal marsh habitats are heavily used by wildlife, migratory birds, and park visitors. They provide valuable ecosystem services, among them critical habitat for brown bears and migratory birds. These marshes are dynamic systems, sensitive to many influences, including warming temperatures, storms, tectonic uplift, development-related activities, and increased visitation. Researchers collect vegetation data in a salt marsh on the Katmai coast. Water Quantity Monitoring in Southwest Alaska 2020 Resource brief on water quantity monitoring at Katmai and Lake Clark national parks and preserves conducted by the Southwest Alaska Network. Hydrology and geology are the two principle drivers that dictate the structure and function of all aquatic systems. In the broadest sense, hydrology encompasses the distribution and movement of water and its interactions with the surrounding environment, whether in the ground, on the landscape, or in the atmosphere. A researcher collects water quantity data. Lake Ice Monitoring 2020 Resource brief on lake ice monitoring (seasonal processes). Lake ice cover is a key component of Alaska ecosystems because it influences the physical processes, chemical processes, and biological productivity of the region’s lakes and the wellbeing of communities that depend on them. Global climate models indicate the climate is warming more rapidly at higher latitudes than it is closer to the equator. Ice just starting to form on a lake, surrounded by snowymountains. Monitoring Razor Clams as an Indicator of Nearshore Ecosystem Health Read the abstract and get the link to a recently published article on how razor clams may be used as indicators of nearshore ecosystem health: Bowen, L., K. L.Counihan, B. Ballachey, H. A. Coletti, T. Hollmen, B. Pister, and T. L. Wilson. 2020. Monitoring nearshore ecosystem health using Pacific razor clams (Siliqua patula) as an indicator species. PeerJ 8:e8761. A bear eats a razor clam at the waters edge. Larger Brown Bear Sows are More Successful in Rearing Cubs Read the abstract and get the link to a new article looking at Alaska brown bear cub recruitment across four populations: Hilderbrand, G. V., D. D. Gustine, K. Joly, B. Mangipane, W. Leacock, M. D. Cameron, M. S. Sorum, L. S. Mangipane, and J. A. Erlenbach. 2019. Influence of maternal body size, condition, and age on recruitment of four brown bear populations. Ursus 29(2): 111-118. A brown bear sow and four cubs. Zooarcheology of a 3,500-year-old Fishery on the Katmai Coast Zooarcheology—the study of animal remains from archeological sites—reveals more than just a list of food items, it tells us how our natural surroundings and our climate have changed over time, how past peoples sustained their resources or over-harvested them, how our technology has advanced to allow our survival, how we relate to animals and each other, and how some things have remained the same. Alaska Park Science 19(1):2020. An archaeological site on a beautiful bay. Salmon Monitoring in Southwest Alaska 2020 Resource brief of salmon monitoring in Katmai and Lake Clark national parks and preserves conducted by the Southwest Alaska Network. Sockeye salmon are an important cultural, economic, and ecological resource in Alaska, particularly in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska. Each year, up to 60 million sockeye salmon migrate back to Bristol Bay to spawn and 60-75% of these returning adults are harvested by commercial fisheries. Spawning salmon in turquoise water. Volcanic Ash Resuspension from the Katmai Region Volcanic ash is not only a hazard during an eruptive event; in strong winds, previously deposited volcanic ash can be reincorporated into dust clouds. Resuspension and transport of fine-grained volcanic ash from Katmai National Park and Preserve has been observed and documented many times over the past several decades and has likely been occurring since the 1912 Novarupta-Katmai eruption, the largest 20th century eruption in the world. Alaska Park Science 18(1):2019. An annotated map showing the Katmai area and volcanic features. Collared Pika Collared pikas are small mammals within the same order as rabbits and hares, and they resemble small rabbits with very short ears and small limbs. Adapted to thrive at high elevations in Alaska, their habitat is at risk -- climate change may drastically change the fragile environment in which they live. tiny gray rabbit-like creature sitting on a rock Arctic Ground Squirrel The largest of the North American ground squirrels, arctic ground squirrels are burrowing rodents that resemble prairie dogs, with small ears, a flat tail, and a white-spotted back. They are very common throughout much of Denali and live mainly in the alpine tundra. two ground squirrels Drivers of Mercury in Top-predator Lake Fish from Southwest Alaska Parklands Some resident lake fish sampled from southwest Alaska parks have elevated concentrations of mercury (mostly methylmercury, a potent neurotoxin and endocrine disrupter). Why do these fish —that inhabit some of the most remote and supposedly pristine waters in North America—have such elevated mercury levels? Answering this question requires an understanding of mercury cycling, or the processes by which mercury moves through the environment. Alaska Park Science 19(1):2020. Lake trout in a net underwater. Weather and Climate in Southwest Alaska 2020 Resource brief on weather and climate in southwest Alaska parks. Weather and climate are key physical drivers of ecosystem structure and function. Global climate models indicate that climate change and variability is occurring more rapidly and amplified at higher latitudes. A weather station in Kenai Fjords National Park. Freshwater Contaminants in Southwest Alaska Parks 2020 Resource brief on freshwater contaminant monitoring in Katmai and Lake Clark national parks and preserves conducted by the Southwest Alaska Network. Mercury is a toxic element with no known essential biological function. It occurs naturally as a solid in various minerals and as a gas in volcanic eruptions. In fish, methylmercury both bioaccumulates and biomagnifies, meaning it increases over time within an individual and it increases up the food chain across individuals. Lake trout in a net. Hoary Marmot Hoary marmots are large rodents that live mainly in alpine areas. Their loud, clear warning calls are a common sound in mountainous regions. closeup of a marmot baby Magnetic Detection of Archaeological Hearths in Alaska Read the abstract and link to a recent article on archaeological research using magnetic detection of hearths: Urban, Thomas M., Jeffrey T. Rasic, Claire Alix, Douglas D. Anderson, Linda Chisholm, Robert W. Jacob, Sturt W. Manning, Owen K.Mason, Andrew H. Tremayne, Dale Vinson (2019). Magnetic detection of archaeological hearths in Alaska: A tool for investigating the full span of human presence at the gateway to North America. Quaternary Science Reviews 211: 73-92. An archaeologist searches for hearths using a magetometer Improving Mussel Monitoring Read the abstract and get a link to a peer-reviewed published article on using mussel gene transcription and physiological assays to monitor nearshore environmental conditions: Counihan, K., L. Bowen, B. Ballachey, H. Coletti, T. Hollmen, B. Pister, and T. L. Wilson. 2019. Physiological and gene transcription assays to assess responses of mussels to environmental changes. PeerJ 7:e7800 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7800 A researcher holds mussels from a nearshore monitoring plot. Harmful Algal Toxins in Alaska's Seabirds and Marine Mammals Seabirds and marine mammals along Alaska's coastline have been experiencing unusually large and consistent die-offs for the past several years, in conjunction with warming ocean temperatures. Researchers want to know if harmful algal blooms, typically associated with warmer climates, are playing a role in these deaths. A researcher examines a dead glaucus gull on a beach. Southwest Alaska Lichen Inventory 2020 Resource brief on the lichen inventory conducted by the Southwest Alaska Network in Katmai and Lake Clark national parks and preserves and in Kenai Fjords National Park. Over 700 previously undocumented lichen taxa are now recognized across southwestern Alaska parks, representing the largest survey of its kind in the region, as well as one of the largest and most comprehensive lichen inventories in Alaska. Researchers examining lichens in the field. Insect Outbreaks in Southwest Alaska 2020 Resource brief on insect outbreaks in Southwest Alaska. Over the last quarter century, the spruce beetle and a suite of other insect pests have caused extensive damage in the forests of southcentral Alaska. Long-term forest monitoring and tree-ring studies are helping us to better understand the timing, frequency, and ecological effects of these outbreaks. Spruce aphids on spruce needles. Visitor Use 2021 Resource Brief of visitor use at Katmai and Lake Clark national parks and preserves. Understanding visitor use patterns across the parks and over time allows park managers to assess where rangers and staff need to be stationed and where impacts to resources (such as trampling) may need to be monitored or mitigated in the future. Visitors watching bears at Brooks Falls in Katmai National Park and Preserve. Refining the Analysis of Hair Samples Read the abstract and get the link to a published paper on how bear hair is used to determine diet and how the method of using hair to determine diet is refined to detect seasonal variation. Rogers, M. C., G. V. Hilderbrand, D. D. Gustine, K. Joly, W. B. Lealock, B. A. Mangipane, and J. M. Welker. 2020. Splitting hairs: Dietary niche breadth modelling using stable isotope analysis of a sequentially grown tissue. Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies. A close look at bear fur. Prey Pulses in a Marine Environment Forage fish serve an important role in our marine environment; these fish serve as prey for many fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. whale fluke in water Looking Back—A Heady Time for National Park Service Science in Alaska Spurred by Alaska gaining statehood and the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA), the 1970s saw a spurt of scientific activity that gave experienced Alaska investigators additional access to remote field study sites and introduced investigators new to Alaska to exciting and challenging opportunities for conducting field study in remote places. mist on forested mountains Research Project: Brown Bear Tracking Although remote, the Alaska Peninsula is still vulnerable to natural and human-caused disturbances. These disturbances could affect the amount of food available for brown bears. As part of a larger project looking at the nearshore environment of the peninsula, biologists will outfit 12 bears with GPS collars, to track their movements between different habitats, and conduct direct observations on these bears to collect data on their foraging behavior. bear and cub digging in mud Coastal Research - Spring 2016 Update For the second consecutive summer, researchers are putting GPS collars on coastal bears in Katmai as part of the Changing Tides project. The May 2016 collaring effort was a great success, with near-perfect weather aiding in the outfitting of ten bears with GPS collars. large brown bear carrying a salmon in its mouth Changing Tides: August 2015 Update Several months into the Changing Tides project, scientists are beginning to see patterns in the foraging movements of collared bears along Katmai's coast. The bears being studied gained significant weight already, even before salmon runs had reached area streams. Data like this will help scientists analyze just how important invertebrates like mussels and clams are to grizzly bear health and their success raising cubs. woman in an orange rain jacket kneeling on a beach near a dozen clams Brown Bear Research Project: July 2015 Update By tracking the movements of bears and assessing body composition, biologists can examine their use of different foraging areas and the importance of different food to overall bear health and survival. This July 2015 update explores the first steps taken in the "Changing Tides" project. map of a coastline with numerous dots near the shore Changing Tides: Intertidal Invertebrates, Bears, and People Clams and other intertidal invertebrates are important early season forage for coastal brown bears along the Alaska Peninsula. A 2015 study will expand on this knowledge through a variety of projects. Working with park partners, park researchers will evaluate the impacts of changing ocean conditions on intertidal communities, gaining valuable insight for long-term preservation of this dynamic nearshore connection. bear and cub Changing Tides: 2016 Midseason Update Highlights from this year's study so far include taking tissue samples from bivalves (e.g., clams), assessing bear health and discovering with a camera trap that bears may be actively predating upon otters! two people digging in a sandy beach Changing Tides: Bear Researcher Videos Check out videos documenting parts of the Changing Tides research project! large brown bear and a cub digging in sand near a gull A Decade of Bald Eagle Surveys in Southwest Alaska Parks 2020 Resource brief on ten years of monitoring data for bald eagles in southwest Alaska parks and the use of the Delphi technique to evaluate monitoring methods going forward. A mature bald eagle perched on a log on the beach. Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal Alaska brown bears exposure to bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens Read the abstract and get the link to a new article on pathogens found in Alaska brown bears published in the Journal of Wildlife Disease: Ramey, A. M., C. A. Cleveland, G. V. Hilderbrand, K. Joly, D. D. Gustine, B. Mangipane, W. B. Leacock, A. P. Crupi, D. E. Hill, J. P. Dubey, and M. J. Yabsley. In press. Exposure of Alaska brown bears (Ursus arctos) to bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents varies spatiotemporally and may be influenced by age. A bear perched on a rock outcrop The Role of the Diamond NN Cannery in Interpreting the History of the Naknek River Fishery The NN Cannery was one of the longest-running canneries. It employed hundreds of residents and thousands of transient workers who produced more canned salmon than any cannery in Alaska. Contained in its century-old buildings are stories of the historical manifestations of capitalism, incorporation, industrialization, immigration, world wars, global pandemics, statehood, resource management, unionization, segregation, and equal rights. Alaska Park Science 19(1):2020. An aerial view of the Diamond NN Cannery on the NakNek River. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Alaska Aviation Safety In Alaska, small planes are often the best way to get around but flying has its risks. Aviation safety requires more than just a pilot’s skill–it takes all of us. Learn more about aviation to increase the safety of your next park flight. An NPS pilot in a plane cockpit flying over a turquoise lake Lake Temperature Trends Water temperatures are warming in southwest Alaska lakes--at the surface and even going deeper in the water column. Learn more about water temperature trends over time. Researchers collecting water data in a mountain lake. The 19th Amendment, Elizabeth Peratrovich, and the Ongoing Fight for Equal Rights In Alaska, women's suffrage passed in 1913—seven years prior to the 19th Amendment—and antidiscrimination legislation passed nearly 20 years prior to the major national civil rights bills of the 1960s. In the 1940s, Elizabeth Peratrovich—a Tlingit woman who was Grand President of the Alaska Native Sisterhood—led the charge to end discrimination against Alaska Natives. gold coin of a raven, a woman's face, and words elizabeth peratrovich anti-discrimination law Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 16 Issue: Science in Alaska's Arctic Parks The National Park Service manages five parks that fall partially or entirely within the Arctic tundra biome. These five parks encompass 19.3 million acres of land and constitute approximately 25% of the land area managed by the National Park Service nationwide. These are undeveloped places, with free-flowing rivers and wilderness at a massive scale. a group of muskox running across a field Series: Changing Tides Articles Browse articles related to the Changing Tides project. This is a research study in Southwest Alaska exploring the connections between coastal brown bears, invertebrates like clams and mussels, and what influence human activities have on bear ecology. a large brown bear and cub digging in a sandy beach near a gull Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 1: Wilderness in Alaska This issue includes: * Economics of Wilderness * Using Ethics Arguments to Preserve Naturalness * Busing Through the Wilderness: "Near-Wilderness" Experiences in Denali ... and more! mountains reflecting into a calm lake, the words 'alaska park science' Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 15 Issue 1: Coastal Research Science in Alaska's National Parks This issue focuses on studies occurring in coastal areas throughout national parks in Alaska. Articles include a variety of studies on arctic coastal lagoons, background on a large research project studying coastal brown bears, and more. a brown bear investigating a clam on a beach Series: The Legacy of ANILCA The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act impacts the National Park Service in many ways. ANILCA stipulates the designation of wilderness, subsistence management, transportation in and across parklands, use of cabins, mining, archaeological sites, scientific research studies and more. Two men drag a harvest seal from icy blue waters across frozen ice. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: Copper River Basin Symposium - Wrangell-St Elias National Park and Preserve February 2020: With a theme of Tradition, Science, and Stewardship, the two-day symposium included keynote speakers, 26 short presentations, and a poster session. A panel discussion delved into opportunities in working with indigenous communities. Ahtna elders provided wisdom in daily welcomes, and there was a presentation by Copper River Stewardship Youth. Topics ranged widely from fisheries to archaeology to geology. As well as sharing knowledge, participants shared meals, stories, and ideas. Copper River Basin Symposium logo by Lindsay and Elvie Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 19, Issue 1 - Below the Surface: Fish and Our Changing Underwater World Alaska has over three million lakes, 12,000 rivers, and an estimated 6,640 miles of ocean coastline. Below the surface swim some of the world’s most abundant, healthy, all-wild fish, including salmon, halibut, and eulachon. Fish sustained Alaska Natives for millennia and continue to represent food and economic security for many people. Alaska Park Science 19(1): 2020 Red-colored salmon swim in turquoise water. Series: Alaska Park Science, Volume 18, Issue 1, Understanding and Preparing for Alaska's Geohazards Alaska is the most geologically active part of North America. Much of the awe-inspiring landscapes of Alaska's parks are created by geologic processes. But sometimes, these processes can be hazardous. This issue explores the state of the science to understand geohazards in Alaska national parks. Alaska Park Science 18(1): 2019. A man jumps down a dune of volcanic ash. Series: Canneries of Alaska Canneries were built in response to the environment. This series is a summary of some of Alaska's canneries and the landscape features that defined where and how they developed. The overall period of significance for canneries in Alaska begins in 1878, when the first two canneries opened, and ends in 1936, when salmon production peaked. While some of these canneries no longer exist, the landscapes continue to tell of the history and importance of that period in the commercial fishing industry. Warehouse-type buildings cluster on wooden piers along a shoreline, as seen from the water. Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 14 Issue 2: Birds of Alaska's National Parks This issue includes articles exploring birds throughout national parks in Alaska. Particular emphasis is on the changing ways to study birds, and the increasing importance not just on the summer homes of birds in Alaska, but the routes between their wintering and summer breeding grounds. a great horned own and two large owlets in a nest Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 11 Issue 1: Volcanoes of Katmai and the Alaska Peninsula This issue is all about volcanoes! Learn more about the landscape of Katmai and the Alaska Peninsula and its remarkable history. cover of the issue featuring a river that has cut through rock with mountains behind Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 11 Issue 2: Science in Southwest Alaska In this issue: * Invasive Species Management * Salmon in a Volcanic Landscape * Archiving Bird Data * and more! cover of Alaska Park Science volume featuring a close-up image of an orange flower Cretaceous Period—145.0 to 66.0 MYA Many now-arid western parks, including Chaco Culture National Historical Park and Mesa Verde National Park, were inundated by the Cretaceous Interior Seaway that bisected North America. Massive dinosaur and other reptile fossils are found in Cretaceous rocks of Big Bend National Park. dinosaur footprint in stone Jurassic Period—201.3 to 145.0 MYA Dinosaur National Monument is home to thousands of dinosaur fossils making it a true “Jurassic Park.” A vast desert covered Southwest North America in the Jurassic, and ancient sand dunes now form tall cliffs in many parks including Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. dinosaur skull in rock face Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Unmanned Aerial Systems as a Tool for Natural Resource Applications The use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) is rapidly expanding as a tool for resource management. Employing UAS to collect data can result in more accurate mapping, decreased cost, and increased personnel safety. Applications of UAS in Alaska parks are demonstrating the benefits and defining best practices for its continued and enhanced use. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A man in orange waders operates a UAS on a rocky coast. Making Sound Decisions Using Bioacoustics in Alaska’s National Parks Animals are continuously immersed in acoustic signals. Acoustic recording devices allow us to extend our sense of hearing to remote places, times, and even frequencies we normally cannot access. By studying the sounds animals make, and the sounds in their environment, we can better understand their conservation needs. Presented here are examples from bats, birds, frogs, and whales. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A man sets up acoustic recording equipment in the backcountry. Series: Alaska Park Science Volume 20 Issue 1 - Parks as Proving Grounds Parks in Alaska pose special challenges to researchers: they are large, remote, and less is known about them. This makes it all the more important that tools and techniques we use here are practical, effective, and impactful. While researchers often focus on sharing the findings from their work, here we shine a light on the devices and approaches used by researchers with attention to the innovation needed to work in Alaska. Alaska Park Science 20 (1), 2021 A scientist uses a probe on the top of a mountain. Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting Katmai Planning a visit to Katmai National Park? Check out our top 10 tips and plan like a park ranger. A sow and cubs resting on a trail Bumble Bees of Alaska: A Field Guide This field guide to bumble bees will help you identify these abundant and conspicuous pollinators, which are found across most of Alaska. They are well-adapted to cold, harsh climates and live in every habitat where there are flowers offering up pollen and nectar, including forests, shrublands, tundra, wetlands, riparian areas, beaches, and gardens. a bumble bee perched on tiny pink flowers Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline.
Park Info National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior The Novarupta A trip planning and information guide to Alagnak Wild River Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve Katmai National Park and Preserve ANELA KOPSHERVER Issue Number 2021 What’s Inside: LIAN LAW NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY NPS PHOTO Brooks Camp...............6 Katmai Origins............14 Backcountry Travel....20 Three National Parks, Many Amazing Experiences National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Alagnak Wild River Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve Katmai National Park and Preserve Katmai was declared a National Monument in 1918; Aniakchak in 1978. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 established Alagnak Wild River, while Katmai and Aniakchak were expanded to include national preserve areas. Katmai was also redesignated a national park. Together, these lands encompass nearly five million acres of unique landscapes managed by the National Park Service. Mailing Address PO Box 7 King Salmon, AK 99613 Park Headquarters Phone: 907-246-3305 Fax: 907-246-2116 Websites Alagnak: www.nps.gov/alag Aniakchak: www.nps.gov/ania Katmai: www.nps.gov/katm Welcome to Katmai Country Welcome to Katmai! Katmai National Park and Preserve (Katmai) lies within the ancestral homelands of the Alutiit-Sugpiat (Aleut) people. Human habitation of this region goes back many thousands of years and speaks of thriving communities and perseverance in the face of challenging environments. Today, the Alutiit-Sugpiat people strive to maintain their traditional lifeways even in light of pressure brought on by an ever-changing world. Their connections to these lands are enduring and worthy of our respect. According, I would like to take a moment to acknowledge our Alaska Native communities—be they Alutiit-Sugpiat, Dena’ina, or Yup’ik—for their enduring legacy as the caretakers of this wonderous land we are fortunate to experience, and today call Katmai. Geographically, Katmai is found on the Alaska Peninsula which encompasses a vast and beautiful landscape where the National Park Service also has the privilege of managing Aniakchak National Monument and Preserve, and the Alagnak Wild River. Regardless of your interests, collectively these different park areas offer a diversity of outstanding Alaskan experiences. The geology of Katmai is both ancient and new. The park’s diverse landscapes comprise expansive mountains, active volcanoes, flowing glaciers and a wild and beautiful seacoast that is frequently fed by sparkling rivers and lakes. The cataclysmic eruption of Novarupta in 1912 took place long ago when compared to a human lifespan, but is geologically recent. The resulting ash covered everything for miles and even today life is still recovering from the effects of the eruption. Many dedicated individuals from diverse walks of life have worked tirelessly over the years to ensure that wildlife remains abundant and diverse throughout this region. It is in large part because of these efforts that Katmai today supports world-class fisheries and outstanding wildlife viewing opportunities. To observe an Alaskan brown bear in its natural environment is a testament to the priorities of our nation. Recently, we have all experienced some very trying times due to the far-reaching effects of the global coronavirus pandemic. Last year we were able to operate, albeit at a reduced operational capacity and this year promises to be similar, though we are striving to expand visitor services where possible during the 2021 season. Thank you for your understanding and cooperation with Covid-19 related mitigations; your adherence to them will help us stay open throughout the season. We are glad you have come here to experience for yourself the sights, sounds, and feel of this special place and we hope that you take home many memories that will last a lifetime. Mark Sturm, Superintendent Contents: Southwest Alaska’s Parklands.................................................2-3 Katmai and the National Park Idea......................................14-15 Essential Information...................................................................4 Exploring the Human History of Katmai..................................16 Getting Here, Getting Around....................................................5 Cycle of the Salmon...................................................................17 Welcome to Brooks Camp........................................................6-7 Fishing Information...................................................................18 Camping at Brooks Camp............................................................8 Backcountry Travel................................................................20-21 Brooks Camp Map........................................................................9 Aniakchak National Monument...........................................22-23 Bear Viewing.......................

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