"Plants of Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens" by NPS / Victoria Stauffenberg , public domain

Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens

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Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens is a National Park Service site located in the north eastern corner of Washington, D.C., and the Maryland state border. Nestled near the banks of the Anacostia River and directly west of the Baltimore–Washington Parkway, Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens preserves a plethora of rare waterlilies and lotuses in the cultivated ponds near the river. The park also contains the Kenilworth Marsh, the only remaining tidal marsh in Washington, D.C. and an adjacent recreational area.

maps

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/keaq/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenilworth_Park_and_Aquatic_Gardens Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens is a National Park Service site located in the north eastern corner of Washington, D.C., and the Maryland state border. Nestled near the banks of the Anacostia River and directly west of the Baltimore–Washington Parkway, Kenilworth Park & Aquatic Gardens preserves a plethora of rare waterlilies and lotuses in the cultivated ponds near the river. The park also contains the Kenilworth Marsh, the only remaining tidal marsh in Washington, D.C. and an adjacent recreational area. Deep within Kenilworth lies an oasis, hidden behind trees and cattails. It's a place where beavers build their homes and turtles sleep on logs. Lotus blooms rise from the muck and lilies sit on the water. The wind dances with the dragonflies, rustling through the trees, carrying the song of the birds until it brushes across your face, fading to a whisper, saying "come join." The park is located in North East Washington D.C. south of route 50 and just off the Baltimore Washington Parkway. The park is also within the D.C. Kenilworth community and the Anacostia river runs along the park boundary. Interstate 295 runs parallel to the park. The park is within half a mile from the Deanwood Metro station on the orange line. Visitor Center The Visitor Center at Kenilworth Park and Aquatic Gardens is an ideal place to begin your visit. Restrooms are located here as well as orientation brochures. A small room of exhibit panels provides a brief overview of the history of the gardens and its key plants. Those with children should ask about the Junior Ranger program. The gift shop offers a variety of items for the nature enthusiast. Plant and animal identification books, water containers, and hats are but some of the items sold. The park is located in North East Washington D.C. south of route 50 and Baltimore Washington Parkway. The park is also within the D.C. Kenilworth community and the Anacostia river runs along the park boundary. Interstate 295 runs parallel to the park. Lotus pond bloom Pink lotus flower blooms in a pond. Lotus flowers bloom in many ponds during the hot humid summer months. Fall Colors Aquatic ponds during the fall with trees displaying orange and yellow colors. As the seasons change, so do the colors around the ponds which can be seen as reflections on the water. Hanging around Turtles basking in the sun. As the temperatures warm up during spring and summer months many reptiles including turtles can be seen basking in the sun on logs, tree stumps or the banks of the ponds. Capturing Moments A woman taking a photo of lotus flowers The summer blooms in and around the ponds attract many photographers and artist from around the world. Flight in Fall Great Blue Heron in flight over the ponds during the fall. The wetlands and marsh habitat many shore birds and they can be seen wading in and around the ponds for food. The Beauty in Water: Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens Landscape A natural oasis blossoms in the heart of the nation's capital. The Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens landscape contains a unique blend of natural and cultural features, shaped and nurtured by the Anacostia River. The presence of water flows through the history and features of the site, which contains ponds of aquatic plants surrounded by marshland. The bright petals of a water lily flower are reflecting in gently rippling water. Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Ash Tree Update 2017 The state of ash trees in 2017 in the National Capital Region after more than 10 years of harm from the invasive emerald ash borer. A white ash leaf Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. Amphibian Diversity & Habitat Connectivity Habitat fragmentation is a major threat to amphibian communities, especially in National Capital Area parks at risk due to the region's growing urbanization. A small frog crouches on a lichen-covered rock. Memorials for the Future Memorials for the Future, is a competition that aims to rethink the way we develop and experience memorials in Washington, D.C. Memorials for the Future Logo Forest Soils Highlights from a 2007-2017 study of soils in National Capital Region Network I&M-monitored parks. Includes discussion of parent materials, heavy metal soil pollutants like lead, and how past land use effects O horizons. Collage of 6 color photos of soil profiles showing colors from orange-y reds to browns and grays. Explore DC’s national parks with a new, free app Navigate to popular destinations, get up-to-date information and discover lesser-known parks. With nearly 800 points of interest, the app includes the National Mall, President's Park, Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Wolf Trap, Arlington House, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Frederick Douglass NHS, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS, Carter G. Woodson NHS, and hundreds more. National Park Service logo with Washington Monument and other memorials. Stiltgrass and Tree Seedling Recovery Recent analysis at Maryland's Catoctin Mountain Park shows Japanese stiltgrass does not limit the growth of tree seedlings in a forest recovering from deer overpopulation. Invasive Japanese stiltgrass blankets the sides of a shady forest road. Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Forest Regeneration 2020 What is the future of our forests? A look at forest regeneration capacity in National Capital Area national parks based on 2020 monitoring data. hand holding a leaflet on a white ash seedling National Capital Region PRISM and Invasive Species Since invasive species don’t recognize park boundaries, we need to work together with our partners, neighbors, and other federal and state entities to manage across borders. We can’t do it alone! a hand holds a rosette of green leaves over the water Plants and Climate Change Changing climate increases stressors that weaken plant resilience, disrupting forest structure and ecosystem services. Rising temperatures lead to more frequent droughts, wildfires, and invasive pest outbreaks, leading to the loss of plant species. That causes a ripple of problems throughout their ecosystems. Monocacy tulip poplar tree Pollinators and Climate Change The changing climate impacts pollinators by shifting growing and blooming seasons and potentially weakening the plant populations that pollinators depend on. Additionally, warmer temperatures have altered migration patterns, affecting pollinator species like Monarch butterflies. Monarch butterfly on yellow flowers

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