"Fall at the Mountain" by Tom Wilson , public domain

Kennesaw Mountain

National Battlefield Park - Georgia

Kennesaw Battlefield Park preserves a Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign, and also contains Kennesaw Mountain. It is located at 905 Kennesaw Mountain Drive, between Marietta and Kennesaw, Georgia. The name "Kennesaw" derives from the Cherokee Indian "Gah-nee-sah" meaning "cemetery" or burial ground.

maps

Official visitor map of Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park (NBP) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Kennesaw Mountain - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park (NBP) in Georgia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).Georgia State - Georgia Bike Map

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/kemo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kennesaw_Mountain_National_Battlefield_Park Kennesaw Battlefield Park preserves a Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign, and also contains Kennesaw Mountain. It is located at 905 Kennesaw Mountain Drive, between Marietta and Kennesaw, Georgia. The name "Kennesaw" derives from the Cherokee Indian "Gah-nee-sah" meaning "cemetery" or burial ground. Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park is a 2,965 acre National Battlefield that preserves a Civil War battleground of the Atlanta Campaign. Opposing forces maneuvered and fought here from June 19, 1864 until July 2, 1864. Although most famous as a Civil War battlefield, Kennesaw Mountain has a much richer story. Kennesaw Mountain NBP is fairly spread out with multiple parking lots. Many visitors begin their visit at the Visitor Center located at 900 Kennesaw Mountain Dr. and orient themselves to the park with Ranger or Volunteer. For more detailed directions, please see link below. Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park Visitor Center The Visitor Center at Kennesaw Mountain is located at 900 Kennesaw Mountain Dr. and is open Monday - Sunday, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm except on major holidays (Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years). Kennesaw Mountain NBP is fairly spread out with several sections and parking lots. We suggest that most visitors begin their visit at the Visitor Center and get oriented with either a Ranger or Volunteer. The Visitor Center is located at 900 Kennesaw Mountain Dr. For more detailed directions, follow link below. Casson with Cannon Fire Casson with Cannon Fire Casson with Cannon Fire Demonstration. Fall at Kennesaw Mountain Cannon with front field and Visitor Center in background. Cannon with front field and Visitor Center in background. Illinois Monument at Kennesaw Mountain Illinois Monument at Kennesaw Mountain. Illinois Monument at Kennesaw Mountain. Infantry Demonstration at Kennesaw Mountain Infantry Demonstration at Kennesaw Mountain. Infantry Demonstration at Kennesaw Mountain. Kolb Farmhouse at Kennesaw Mountain Kolb Farmhouse at Kennesaw Mountain. Kolb Farmhouse at Kennesaw Mountain. 2014 Recipients: George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Discover the inspirational stories and amazing dedication of volunteers honored with the 2014 Hartzog Award. Volunteer Thelma Johnson standing with her cooking equipment 2016 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2016, six rangers were awarded a national or regional Freeman Tilden Award for excellence in interpretation. Learn more about their amazing programs! Lynette Weber NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park, Georgia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] cannon in field with mountain in background Make Your Own Park and Logo National Parks protect important parts of the American story. This includes natural resources, historical resources, wildlife resources, and more. The emblem of the National Park Service illustrates this with many key images. This activity allows you to create YOUR own National Park and draw what is important on your own logo. What resources does your park protect? Little boy with a park ranger's flat hat National Park Getaway: Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park As you sit on the mountain top and enjoy the tranquil scenery, you might wonder what previous visitors to Kennesaw Mountain may have seen or experienced. A rustle in the wood line interrupts your reverie and leaves you curious: Was this sound one that some long past visitor might have heard? When you journey through these woods you follow in the footsteps of many who lived, fought, and died on this land. red berries on a green tree National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face "You cannot remain where you are now": Cherokee Resistance and Relocation in the 1830s The Cherokee Nation tried to hold on to their ancestral lands, but in the 1830s gold and a new U.S. president made this impossible. Cherokee leaders John Ross and Major Ridge fought for their tribe from different perspectives. The Indian Removal Act and the Treaty of New Echota allowed Federal troops to force thousands of Cherokee to take the Trail of Tears to new land in the West. Chief John Ross Protests the Treaty of New Echota In the 1830s, the Cherokee were divided on the issue of adopting aspects of white, European-American culture or maintaining an indigenous culture and identity. Several incidents occurred after the passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830 that prompted several members of the Cherokee Nation to sign the Treaty of Echota. This treaty eventually led to the Trail of Tears. Cherokee Chief John Ross opposes the treaty in this letter to the U.S Senate and House of Representatives. Cherokee Council Meetings from 1829; Chief Womankiller Since the early 1800s, the Cherokee Nation tried to protect their lands by assimilating into the European-American culture as much as possible. However, when Andrew Jackson became president in 1828, that tactic rapidly changed. Gold was found so people desperately wanted Cherokee lands. Chief Womankiller speaks at a Cherokee Council meeting in favor of enacting a bill to prevent this rush on their land. Preludes to the Trail of Tears Sections of primary documents detailing events that led to the Trail of Tears: Dahlonega Gold Rush; Indian Removal Act; Cherokee Nation v Georgia; Worcester v Georgia; Treaty of Echota. The Cherokee Nation in the 1820s Cherokee culture thrived for thousands of years in the southeastern United States before European contact. In the 1800s, when the Europeans settlers arrived, members of the Cherokee Nation tried to assimilate European-American culture. Cherokee leaders such as Major Ridge and Chief John Ross believed this was the best way to hold onto their Cherokee lifeways. The Civil War's Impact on Schools for the Deaf and the Blind in the South Schools for the Deaf and the Blind were profoundly affected by the Civil War, and in very different ways between schools in the North and the South. In the North, schools continued their terms, with the battles being taught as "current events." In the South, students were sent home as their schools were taken over as field hospitals or severely damaged in battles. Metal sign on a vertical post in front of a 2-story, red-brick building with 2 rows of windows. Causes of Deafness During the Civil War Civil War soldiers faced death on a daily basis. However, they also faced going home with various disabilities. One such disability was partial or complete deafness. Many soldiers were accustomed to temporary deafness from the constant artillery fire in the field. However, illness, the environment, and even the medicine the doctors used on patients could cause a much more permanent hearing loss. 102 Cases of Deafness.Prepared 4 Consideration of senate & house of reps. by Wallace E. Foster.

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