"Lake Bennett" by NPS photo , public domain

Klondike Gold Rush

National Historical Park - Alaska

Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park seeks to commemorate the Klondike Gold Rush of the late 1890s. Though the gold fields that were the ultimate goal of the stampeders lay in the Yukon Territory, the park comprises staging areas for the trek there and the routes leading in its direction. There are four units, including three in Municipality of Skagway Borough, Alaska and a fourth in the Pioneer Square National Historic District in Seattle, Washington.

maps

Map of Historic Gold Rush Trails from Skagway and Dyea in Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park (NHP) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Klondike Gold Rush - Historic Gold Rush Trails

Map of Historic Gold Rush Trails from Skagway and Dyea in Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park (NHP) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Downtown Skagway for Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park (NHP) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Klondike Gold Rush - Downtown Skagway

Map of Downtown Skagway for Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park (NHP) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Glacier Bay - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Glacier Bay - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in Alaska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/klgo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klondike_Gold_Rush_National_Historical_Park Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park seeks to commemorate the Klondike Gold Rush of the late 1890s. Though the gold fields that were the ultimate goal of the stampeders lay in the Yukon Territory, the park comprises staging areas for the trek there and the routes leading in its direction. There are four units, including three in Municipality of Skagway Borough, Alaska and a fourth in the Pioneer Square National Historic District in Seattle, Washington. Headlines screamed "Gold!" The dream of a better life catapulted thousands of people to Alaska and the Yukon Territory. Their journey shaped them, and changed the people they encountered and the north forever. Today, the park remembers the trails, boomtowns, and stories of the Klondike Gold Rush. Park headquarters and visitor center are located at 2nd and Broadway in Skagway, Alaska. To get to Skagway by car: you can access the park via the Alaska Marine Highway or the South Klondike Highway. By plane: you can fly into the Skagway Airport. By water: You can visit the park by cruise ship, tour boat, or ferry. The park visitor center is less than half a mile from all docks. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park Visitor Center The visitor center is located in the historic White Pass & Yukon Route depot. Talk to a ranger, learn about daily programs, watch park film "Gold Fever: Race to the Klondike," and more. Restrooms, water stations, and benches are available for visitors. The visitor center is located at the corner of 2nd and Broadway in the old White Pass & Yukon Route Broadway Depot building. The Chilkoot Trail Center Open daily Memorial Day to Labor Day, this is the registration and information center for the Chilkoot Trail. Stop by to pick up your Chilkoot Trail permit, see the bear awareness video, and get your trail orientation. During permit season, regularly scheduled orientations are at 8am, 10am, noon, 2pm, and 4pm daily. The Chilkoot Trail Center is located on the east side of Broadway between 5th and 6th Avenues in Skagway, Alaska. Canyon City The Canyon City campground provides a nice place to take a break from hiking, with several tables and two warming shelters. This backcountry campground is at mi 7.7 (km 12.5). The campground is located just half a mile from the historic Canyon City townsite where hikers can see artifacts leftover from the gold rush days including the large metal tram boiler. In order to camp overnight along the Chilkoot Trail on the U.S. side you must purchase a backcountry permit from the Chilkoot Trail Center in Skagway. Overnight fee, US and Canadian sides 54.60 Camping overnight on the Chilkoot Trail you requires a permit. In 2016 the permit for travel on both sides of the trail (US/Canada) was $54.60(CDN). Prices are independent of the number of nights you stay on either side. Overnight fee, US side only 20.30 Camping overnight on the Chilkoot Trail you requires a permit. In 2016 the permit for US Side only was $20.30 (CDN). Prices are independent of the number of nights you stay on either side. Canyon City People sit at picnic tables in front of a white wall tent Catching up at Canyon City Canyon City Cabin Front view of a log cabin with porch Constructed in the 1960s, the Canyon City log cabin has been part of recreational hiking for decades. Canyon City cabin - inside Inside of a log cabin with people gathered around a wood stove. A gathering place out of the elements. Warming shelter and bear proof storage White canvas wall tent and two metal bear storage containers The wall tent can be used for cooking or shelter. Two sets of metal bear boxes are located nearby for all items with a scent. Dyea Campground The Dyea Campground is located 9 miles from Skagway. Nestled in the trees along the banks of the Taiya River with limited amenities, the Dyea Campground is a restful place from busy town. The campground is within a short drive or bike ride of the historic townsite of Dyea and a half mile from the Chilkoot Trailhead. The campground is monitored by National Park Service rangers and is open when free of snow. Campsite Fee 10.00 This is the nightly cost for each site regardless of RV, tent, group, or walk-in. Campsite 22 Campsite with a tent, picnic table, and fire ring Just one campsite in the sleepy Dyea campground Campsite in the trees A tent and table in an open area viewed through the trees. The Dyea campground represents a restful place after the hustle and bustle of Skagway. Nestled in the trees Windy road in the trees with a car partially obscured The Dyea Campground is nestled in the trees along the banks of the Taiya River. Campsite amenities Picnic table and fire ring in an open area Each campsite comes with a picnic table and fire ring. Dyea Campground Campsites in the trees The Dyea campground is located next to the Taiya River. Finnegan's Point Finnegan's Camp is the first backcountry campground 5mi (8m) on the Chilkoot Trail. It is located near the Taiya River. On clear days you can see the Irene glacier, a hanging glacier, across the river from the campground. In order to camp overnight along the Chilkoot Trail on the U.S. side you must purchase a backcountry permit from the Chilkoot Trail Center in Skagway. Overnight fee, both US and Canadian sides 54.60 Camping overnight on the Chilkoot Trail you requires a permit. In 2016 the permit for travel on both sides of the trail (US/Canada) was $54.60(CDN). Prices are independent of the number of nights you stay on either side. Overnight fee, US side only 20.30 Camping overnight on the Chilkoot Trail you requires a permit. In 2016 the permit for US Side only was $20.30 (CDN). Prices are independent of the number of nights you stay on either side. Finnegan's Point White tent structure and people sitting at the base of a tree Hikers taking a break at Finnegan's Point Tent sites Two women with backpacking gear stand on a large wooden platform All six sites at Finnegan's Point Campground have raised, wooden platforms. Irene Glacier Glacier nestled in mountains and clouds with a waterfall at the bottom Irene Glacier is across the valley from Finnegan's Point campground. Warming shelter White canvas tent This canvas wall tent provides a warming shelter for hikers at Finnegan's Point Inside the warming shelter Inside of a small framed structure. Benches along the wall and cast iron stove. The warming shelter at Finnegan's Point has places to sit, some park information, and a small stove. Bear boxes Metal bear boxes with two doors Bear boxes are used to store anything with a scent including food and toiletries Pleasant Camp Pleasant Camp is located near the Taiya River 10.7mi (17.3km) from the trailhead. It is just after a relatively large elevation gain coming from Canyon City (hiking south to north) and often a "pleasant" spot to spend some time. Pleasant Camp is the trail's least used campground and offers hikers a tranquil evening. However, if you are hiking over the pass directly from Pleasant Camp, prepare for a very long, next day traversing the Golden Stairs. You must purchase a backcountry permit for this campground. Overnight fee, US and Canada 54.60 Camping overnight on the Chilkoot Trail you requires a permit. In 2016 the permit for travel on both sides of the trail (US/Canada) was $54.60(CDN). Prices are independent of the number of nights you stay on either side. Overnight fee, US side only 20.30 Camping overnight on the Chilkoot Trail you requires a permit. In 2016 the permit for US Side only was $20.30 (CDN). Prices are independent of the number of nights you stay on either side. Pleasant Camp People gather near a white canvas tent Hikers rest in front of the warming shelter at Pleasant Camp Sheep Camp Sheep Camp is the last campground on the U.S. side of the trail before (at 13mi, 20.9km). As a result it is a popular campsite in the peak summer months and can be fully booked. Sheep Camp is the location of the National Park Service backcountry ranger station. Each evening a ranger will do a presentation in the campground providing an update on current trail conditions, tips for the trail, and some history of the area. You must purchase a permit to stay at this campground at the Trail Center in Skagway. Overnight fee, US and Canadian sides 54.60 Camping overnight on the Chilkoot Trail you requires a permit. In 2016 the permit for travel on both sides of the trail (US/Canada) was $54.60(CDN). Prices are independent of the number of nights you stay on either side. Overnight fee, US side only 20.30 Camping overnight on the Chilkoot Trail you requires a permit. In 2016 the permit for US Side only was $20.30 (CDN). Prices are independent of the number of nights you stay on either side. Ranger briefing at Sheep Camp Ranger talks to a group of hikers in the rain A park ranger trail updates hikers on trail conditions in one of the nightly presentations at Sheep Camp. Tent platform Wooden platform in a vegetated area Tent sites at Sheep Camp are on raised, wooden platforms. Gateway to the gold rush Aerial view of town in a valley with cruise ships in port The historic district in Skagway, Alaska is one of three units of the park in Alaska. Skagway Historic District Colorful buildings Explore history with the restored buildings at Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park Walking Tour People standing around a ranger in front of a building. Enjoy a free historic walking tour with a ranger. The Chilkoot Trail View from a mountain pass down a valley Each summer thousands of people hike along the "worlds longest museum" Captain William Moore Cabin Group of people gathered around a log cabin with a ranger The first building in Skagway was built in 1887, ten years before the Klondike gold rush. Nellie Cashman Learn about Nellie Cashman: businesswoman, miner, prospector, philanthropist, voter. painting of a young woman Women Who Went To The Klondike The Klondike Gold Rush motivated 100,000 stampeders to journey to the far reaches of northwestern Canada in search for gold. Although a small percent of those stampeders were women, they were still able to find adventure, entrepreneurship, and inspiration in the Klondike. Three men and a woman gather around a gold pan. Archie Burns' Chilkoot Tramway Archie Burns had an advantage over other stampeders - he was already in the area when the Klondike Gold Rush began. A "schemer of restless energy" he began to operate tramway systems to help stampeders move their "ton of goods" over the Chilkoot Trail. 2015 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2015 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Teaching with Historic Places in the Parks: Teaching the Klondike Gold Rush I was apprehensive – how could I write a lesson plan in just five days? I was never trained as a teacher; I had no idea what to do. Fortunately, the TwHP template is easy to use and can be applied to any historical site, public or private, prehistoric or modern. ad for boots for those heading to the Klondike NPS photo Rushing to the Grave Stampeders from all over the world came to seek their fortunes during the Klondike Gold Rush but many were unprepared for the dangers ahead. Violence, disease, and Mother Nature waited for them, and many stampeders would die before they even set foot in the gold fields of Dawson City. Grave stones from the Dyea slide cemetery. Chilkoot Tramways and the Peterson Hoist As thousands of stampeders headed north during the Klondike Gold Rush, they faced the challenge of moving "one ton" of goods over the towering Coast Mountains. Seeking to make this easier, and make money, a number of tramways sprang up along the Chilkoot Trail. The Dyea-Klondike Transportation Company Tramway The tramway system, with its powerhouse, its cables and the small towers was erected during the winter of 1897-1898. Today this tram provides some of the most visible reminders of this part of gold rush history. Learn about the short life of the Dyea-Klondike Transportation Company's tramway. The Chilkoot Railroad and Transportation Company Tramway The Chilkoot Railroad and Transport Company advertised an efficient, integrated transportation network stretching from Dyea to Lake Lindeman. As stampeders raced to transport "a ton of goods" north, this option took some of the load off. Alaska Railroad and Transportation Company Tramway The Alaska Railroad and Transportation Company was just one part of the vast Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Their tram, powered by a gasoline engine, was one tram carrying supplies up the Chilkoot Pass. Excavation Spotlight: Kinney Bridge Complex As the Taiya River threatened the Kinney Bridge area, archeologists raced to find gold rush artifacts before they were lost. Excavation site next to a river Kittlitz's murrelets abundance estimates, 2009-2015 The Southeast Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network completed abundance estimates for the Kittliz's murrelet in Glacier Bay proper. Kittlitz's murrelet in flight. The Princess Sophia Explore the intricacies of the sinking of the Princess Sophia that occurred in the icy waters of the Lynn Canal in 1918. Historic image of ship in ocean with passengers on board. Martin Itjen Curiosities Skagway holds many preserved artifacts from the Klondike Gold Rush Era. Martin Itjen created his own artifacts for visitors to view the history of Skagway through his eyes. His creations and curiosities take you back to a time of early tourism, and early preservation, which helped keep the stories of the gold rush alive. A ram's head with glowing eyes National Park Getaway: Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park (Alaska Unit) Where once thousands of gold rush stampeders off-loaded tons of supplies, today's travelers arrive in Skagway on cruise ships, ferry boats, RVs or airplanes. Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park invites you to explore this “Gateway to the Klondike.” This boomtown of 1897-98 offers colorful historic buildings, guided tours, and local characters that help bring this history back to life. Lake surrounded by mountains A Brief History Of Tourism In Skagway The rich and unique stories of the Klondike Gold Rush have attracted visitors to Skagway for over a century. Although tourism has drastically changed since the late 1800's, the history of Skagway has remained as alive and vibrant as when it first began. Learn more about the people who helped kick-start the tourism industry within Skagway and Alaska. Monitoring Eulachon in Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park Eulachon, sometimes called hooligan or candlefish, are an anadromous smelt important ecologically and as a subsistence resource. Read about our recent (2017) monitoring project on the Taiya River in Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. A researcher measures and adult eulachon. A History of Science in Alaska's National Parks National park units in Alaska precede the establishment of the National Park Service in 1916. The first park unit, Sitka National Monument, was conceived in 1908, and by the mid-1920s four national monuments along with Alaska’s first national park were part of the growing park system. Discover how the early 1900s and observations of a few helped to establish the National Park Service in Alaska. Black and white photo of Arno Cammerer sitting at his desk looking through papers. The Klondike Gold Rush: A Search for the Archaeological Traces of an Historic Migration Event People have been migrating into and through Alaska for over 14,000 years. The last major migration into Alaska began with the Russian colonialism in the mid-late 18th century and intensified with the arrival of Euro-American traders, missionaries, and prospectors in the mid-late 19th century. The Klondike Gold Rush from 1896-1899 was a particularly intense, but brief, wave of migration that would forever change the course of history for Alaska. Alaska Park Science 17(1), 2018 A group of men stand together about to depart for the Klondike gold fields. The People Back Home and the Sinking of the Clara Nevada The story of Robert Bruce Banks, a father of six, looking for work in the gold rush boomtown of Skagway. Gain insight about what is was like to be the family left behind and find out more about Robert, his wife and children, and how he met his untimely end. A ship run aground on rocks Gang of Gams and Cut Throats In Seattle Fred W. Dewey had to purchase gear for his trip north. He needed his camp gear plus a year's supply of food. He encountered shell-game-men and other bunco artists during his Seattle visit. 1890s three story brick store with goods to be sold piled on sidewalk in front of building. But There Is Some Pleasure, too. Here in Bennett Fred and his friends build their boats, watch stampeders fall through the ice, enjoy each others company and wait for the Yukon River to melt so they can float to the Klondike. A collection of white tents along a lake. It Was Grand: Inside Passage Fred Dewey boards a steamship to go up the Inside Passage from Seattle to Dyea, Alaska. He encounters bad weather, sick dogs and seasick people. Two photos of steamships alongside wharfs. Artifact Spotlight: Canyon City Boiler Located near the Canyon City campground on the Chilkoot Trail is a large steam boiler. Once used to power a tramway that carried stampeders' goods up the summit, it now serves as a reminder of the innovation of the Gold Rush era. Archeologists continue to monitor this large artifact to protect it from adverse impacts. Large iron boiler in a forest Buildings, Community, and Tourism The first cruise ship passengers arrived in Skagway in 1898. Today over 10,000 cruise passengers may visit in one day. From the White Pass and Yukon Route Railroad to Martin Itjen, to the man who kept it going, explore the integral role the gold rush holds in Skagway’s tourism industry. Red building on a street corner. Frédérick Verbauwhede’s Cigar Store and Confectionery Frédérick Verbauwhede came to Skagway to mine gold, yet quickly realized the best way to make money during the gold rush was to own a business. He opened a cigar shop and confectionery in Skagway's Red Light District to capitalize on the stampeders, eventually moving his business to the downtown area. Today the building contributes to the Skagway Historic District. Cream colored building on a snow covered street. The Many Faces of Jeff. Smiths Parlor Discover the evolution of Jeff. Smiths Parlor from the Klondike Gold Rush's earliest days to now. Jeff. Smiths Parlor with American flags and red, white, and blue bunting. The Beginnings of the Golden North Hotel One of the most noticable landmarks of downtown Skagway, the Golden Dome Hotel has been in Skagway since the time of the Klondike Gold Rush. Originally, the Klondike Trading Company and Sylvester's Store, in 1908 the upper floors became one of the better hotels in Skagway, continuously sharing the downstairs with a variety of stores. Three story white and yellow hotel with a golden dome at the top corner. Excavation Spotlight: Soapy's Parlor Before Jeff. Smith's Parlor Museum could be rehabilitated reopened to the public, park archeologists conducted an excavation to protect cultural resources. The excavation provided information about Skagway's changing tide line. A white building in front of a snow covered mountain Land Ownership in National Park System Units in Alaska and Possibilities for Mining and Other Developments There are over 54 million acres of National Park System units in Alaska, which is 65 percent of the entire National Park System. Although most of those lands are in federal ownership and are managed by the NPS, there are over two million acres of non-federally owned lands within those units. These non-federal lands are in private, state, borough, or municipal ownership. The existence of these lands creates the possibility of mining and other developments within the boundaries rustic buildings near a creek, hills and mountains in the distance Artifact Spotlight: Canvas Boats at Chilkoot Pass Nestled between rocks and boulders near the top of Chilkoot Pass are over 50 bundles. Most bundles consist of canvas wrapped around pieces of wood. Though they initially appear to be tents or bedrolls, they are canvas boats, long abandoned 16 miles from the ocean, over 3000 ft above sea level on a mountain pass. People and brown bundles on a mountain pass Artifact Spotlight: Gas Engine Winch Near the summit of the Chilkoot Trail lies a reminder of the gold rush and the heavy loads people carried with them on their quest for gold. Rusted metal item between large rocks Reindeer to the Rescue When famine faced the new city of Dawson City, the United States government devised a plan to save them from starvation...reindeer to the rescue! Learn about the birth of this plan and its failure to save anyone, including the reindeer themselves. Black and white postcard of a reindeer Immersive 3D Interactive Tours Over the last three years, HFC working with Klondike Gold Rush NHP developed the NPS-approved process to create, present, and manage virtual tours on NPS.gov. View of a saloon with polished wooden floors Gold Rush Bicycles There were many ways to get to the gold fields, and one of them was by bicycle. Although the world was excited about a new way of transportation, this historic vehicle proposed a whole new set of challenges for the eager stampeders as they transported their supplies over the pass. A black and white photo of a man after falling off of his bike Monitoring and Park Management Read the abstract and get the link to an article published in Ecosphere: Rodhouse, T. J., C. J. Sergeant, and E. W. Schweiger. 2016. Ecological monitoring and evidence-based decision-making in America's National Parks: highlights of the Special Feature. Ecosphere 7(11):e01608. NPS at work on a boat. Effects of Cruise Ship Emissions on Air Quality and Terrestrial Vegetation in Southeast Alaska Increased tourism in Southeast Alaska has raised concerns about the levels and ecological effects of air pollutants emitted by cruise ships in dock and in transit. A monitoring program is in place to measure regional and local air pollutants accumulated by vegetation and in deposition. An image looking down at cruise ships docked at Skagway harbor, with haze hovering between mountains Aurora Borealis: A Brief Overview A brief overview of how Northern Lights occur. two ribbons of greenish light in a dark blue sky, over a very dark forest Practice Safe Bear Spray Use Proper behavior in bear country and understanding bear behavior can help to avoid dangerous situations for people and bears. Bear spray should be used as a last line of defense when dealing with bears- not immediately upon seeing one. This introduction will help cover bear behaviors as well as safe use of bear pepper spray. A black bear stands on a wooden bench. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, Alaska and Washington Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] mountain pass trail Avalanche! In this section Fred tells about the avalanche that killed almost 100 people near Sheep Camp. He also tells about his final push to the Summit of Chilkoot Pass. Men at bottom of mountain pass and climbing pass. The Palm Sunday Avalanche April 3, 1898. After ignoring warnings from the local Alaska Native trail veterans, hundreds of stampeders were caught off guard by an avalanche. Dozens of people were killed in the most publicized casualty event of the Klondike Gold Rush of 1897-98. Wooden grave markers scattered among trees. Skagway's Camera Club From professionals to amateurs, the Klondike Gold Rush was well documented through photographs. After the rush, recreational photography was a popular hobby in Skagway, Alaska. The Skagway Camera Club organized outings, hosted lectures, and left behind many images of early life in post-gold rush Alaska. Black and white photo of two men with old fashioned camera looking at a rock blast Bat Projects in Parks: Alaska Region Parks Bats in Alaska? Find out! A scenic view of Alaska, mountains in the distance and a grizzly in front of a lake in the front. Artifact Spotlight: Promotional Button Discovered during an excavation in the heart of former gold rush boomtown Skagway, Alaska, this button is linked to the town's World War II history. Close up of rusty metal button You Bloated Mine Owners Stampeder Fred W. Dewey travels by train in 1898 from New York State to Seattle, Washington on his way to the Klondike Gold Rush. steam train engine Bear Identification There are a combination of characteristics to look for that can help you identify between black and brown bears. Knowing the difference between the two can help you make safe choices in bear country. Brown bear walking down a beach Michael J. Heney: The Irish Prince The Klondike Gold Rush (1897-1898) sparked an influx of fortune seekers to the Canadian interior. Transportation systems were quickly developed to aid the movement of new arrivals and goods over the rugged terrain. Michael J. Heney, also known as the "Irish Prince," was responsible for authorizing and supervising construction of successful railroad routes in Alaska. A group of workers pose beside railroad ties on an incomplete section of railroad. Identifying Vulnerable Mountain Goat Populations Mountain goats are the only alpine ungulate found in Glacier Bay National Park (GLBA) and Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park (KLGO), and are a popular viewing species for visitors to the parks. Recent aerial surveys in both parks showed a decline in several mountain goat populations. Adult mountain goat The First Aeroplane in Skagway The first plane(s) in Skagway, Alaska! Not only the first to fly over the city, but also the first to come here as parts in a crate and the first to land. Read more about these stories and the people behind them during this exciting time in Alaska. crowd of people stand facing low flying plane over town black and white Future Challenges for Salmon and the Freshwater Ecosystems of Southeast Alaska Mass animal migrations are awe-inspiring sights. Every summer and fall, residents and visitors to Alaska can witness one of the great underwater migrations: Pacific salmon returning from the ocean to their home streams, rivers, and lakeshores to spawn. Hundreds of millions of salmon return to Alaska’s freshwaters annually. Alaska Park Science 17(1), 2018. A group of red salmon. Water Quality Practitioner's Guide Read the abstract and find the link to the article published in Environmental Monitoring and Assessment: Sergeant, C. J., E. N. Starkey, K. K. Bartz, M. H. Wilson, and F. J. Mueter. 2016. A practitioner’s guide for exploring water quality patterns using Principal Components Analysis and Procrustes. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 188(4):1-15. Researchers collecting water quality data. My Back Is Lame, My Feet Are Sore The hard works begins for Fred Dewey as he takes his outfit to Sheep Camp up though the frozen canyon of the Taiya River. Men struggle up a snow covered canyon with their sled. Gardening in Skagway Gardening has a long history in Skagway dating back to the Klondike Gold Rush. Explore how this town gets the nickname "Garden City" of Alaska and this tradition continues today. A couple stands next to their blooming marigolds in front of the Golden North Hotel. Carnation the Moose and Other Animals in Early Skagway From pet moose to to carrying chickens over the Chilkoot, learn some of the adventures of animals in the far north. Black bear pulling two men on a sled Influence of Climate Change on Geohazards in Alaskan Parks Alaska’s parks are dynamic and are undergoing constant geomorphic change as glaciers and streams erode and cliffs collapse. Based on climate projec-tions, some permafrost in Alaska will thaw, and many glaciers will thin and retreat, over the remainder of this century, uncovering potentially unstable valley walls. Both permafrost thaw and glacier thinning will contribute to an increase in the incidence of landslides. mountain with its base eroded away 2017 Science Education Grants The Murie Science and Learning Center (MSLC) funds numerous outreach projects through the Science Education Grant program. These grants help MSLC partner parks pay for science education outreach projects. Funding for the Science Education grant program is provided by Alaska Geographic. Read about the 2017 Science Education Grant recipients and their outreach projects. two girls sit in a kayak out on the water Eulachon: A Little Fish with Many Names and a Big Ecological Impact Each spring in Southeast Alaska, wildlife and people alike eagerly await the same phenomenon—schools of a small, silvery, oily fish. But we know very little about the dynamics of the fishery, especially in the Taiya River in the park. This two-year study pointed to further research questions. Alaska Park Science 19(1): 2020. A school of hooligan in a river. Freshwater Quality Monitoring The Southeast Alaska Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors the health of the Salmon, Taiya, and Indian Rivers in Alaska. This article reports on the recent findings on the water quality of these rivers. salmon river in Alaska Commercial Use of Wilderness at Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park Because of increasing demand for commercial use of the wilderness-like area of Dyea, Klondike is preparing a new plan to manage this use. Among other issues, the plan will address the carrying capacity of the Dyea area for recreation. To help inform this plan, a series of visitor surveys were conducted to address this issue. This article describes these studies. composite of six images of a forest with progressively more people Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal Weather and Climate Monitoring in Glacier Bay and Klondike Weather and climate monitoring research brief for Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve, and Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Alaska Aviation Safety In Alaska, small planes are often the best way to get around but flying has its risks. Aviation safety requires more than just a pilot’s skill–it takes all of us. Learn more about aviation to increase the safety of your next park flight. An NPS pilot in a plane cockpit flying over a turquoise lake Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 12 Issue 2: Climate Change in Alaska's National Parks In this issue: * Status and Trends of Alaska National Park Glaciers * Tracking Glacial Landscapes: High School Science Gets Real * Climate Change Scenario Planning Lessons from Alaska a hillside overlooking a wide valley filled by a glacier, surrounded by steep mountains Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 2: Mineral and Energy Development There’s no denying that energy and mineral extraction have been and will continue to be important across the North for a long time. Mining and energy-related industries provide direct and indirect employment for thousands of people, taxes and other revenues. Our need is for science, engineering, and scholarly research; to develop safe, effective, and affordable technologies; to protect, preserve, and restore the natural and human environment; and to record and communicate our history. aerial view of buildings and a pier sticking out into the ocean Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 13 Issue 1: Wilderness in Alaska This issue includes: * Economics of Wilderness * Using Ethics Arguments to Preserve Naturalness * Busing Through the Wilderness: "Near-Wilderness" Experiences in Denali ... and more! mountains reflecting into a calm lake, the words 'alaska park science' Series: The Legacy of ANILCA The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act impacts the National Park Service in many ways. ANILCA stipulates the designation of wilderness, subsistence management, transportation in and across parklands, use of cabins, mining, archaeological sites, scientific research studies and more. Two men drag a harvest seal from icy blue waters across frozen ice. Series: Fred W. Dewey's Trip to the Klondike Fred W. Dewey, age 26, left Jamestown in February 1898 to go to the Klondike in search of gold. He represented a group of friends who financed the venture. His letters home give a vivid picture of the almost unbelievable hardships and grueling hard work men endured in the elusive search for great wealth. Two men sawing, one man above the other on a platform. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: HFC's Digital Media Immersive 3D Interactive Tours The NPS preserves some of Americaʻs...and objects in person. Interior view of a saloon. A long white bar with a dark wooden top is to the left of the view. Series: Chilkoot Tramways During the Klondike Gold rush three aerial tramways and several surface hoists operated over the Chilkoot Pass. These moved supplies and gear over the steep terrain. Two of the tramways are significant engineering feats and one was one of the first aerial tramways powered by electricity. These tramways and hoists were important final links to make Dyea and the Chilkoot Pass the dominant route to the interior during the height of the Klondike Gold Rush. Two men standing in a rocky valley under a canoe on an aerial tramway Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 19, Issue 1 - Below the Surface: Fish and Our Changing Underwater World Alaska has over three million lakes, 12,000 rivers, and an estimated 6,640 miles of ocean coastline. Below the surface swim some of the world’s most abundant, healthy, all-wild fish, including salmon, halibut, and eulachon. Fish sustained Alaska Natives for millennia and continue to represent food and economic security for many people. Alaska Park Science 19(1): 2020 Red-colored salmon swim in turquoise water. Series: Creative Teaching with Historic Places: Selections from CRM Vol 23 no 8 (2000) These articles are a selection from a special issue of CRM Journal, "Creative Teaching with Historic Places" published in 2000. They provide examples of teaching using historic places both in and out of the classroom, helping students connect with history using the power of place, as well as how to prepare lessons making those connections. Teaching with Historic Places is a program of the National Park Service. Cover of CRM Journal "Creative Teaching with Historic Places" Series: Alaska Park Science - Volume 17, Issue 1. Migration: On the Move in Alaska Alaska is home to many amazing animal migrations. In this issue, you will read about caribou, salmon, Golden Eagles, Swainson's Thrushes, beluga whales, and more. Human migrations have also occurred here, from ancient Beringia to the Klondike Gold Rush. You can even read about now-extinct species from the Cretaceous and Pleistocene eras. Enjoy this issue of Alaska Park Science and read about migration. Alaska Park Science 17(1), 2018. Caribou swim across a river. Water Quality Monitoring, 2018 Annual Update Water quality is an important and sensitive indicator of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. Monitoring river and stream conditions helps scientists and park managers detect environmental patterns driven by human activity, climate change and watershed dynamics, then use that information to make better-informed decisions. The following is a data summary from 2018 for Southeast Alaska parks. An aerial view of the watershed of the Taiya River Water Quality Monitoring, 2020 Annual Update Water quality is an important and sensitive indicator of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. Monitoring river and stream conditions helps scientists and park managers detect environmental patterns driven by human activity, climate change and watershed dynamics, then use that information to make better-informed decisions. The following is a data summary from 2020 for Southeast Alaska parks. A sonde in the Indian River Water Quality Monitoring, 2019 Annual Update Water quality is an important and sensitive indicator of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem health. Monitoring river and stream conditions helps scientists and park managers detect environmental patterns driven by human activity, climate change and watershed dynamics, then use that information to make better-informed decisions. The following is a data summary from 2019 for Southeast Alaska parks. Salmon crowd the aptly named Salmon River. A New Resource for Researching America's Elephants Mammoths, mastodons, and other proboscideans are among the most familiar fossil organisms. An inventory complied by Jim Mead and others documents the occurrences of these animals in 63 National Park Service units. photo-illustration of a ranger standing next to a mammoth Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 13, No. 1, Spring 2021 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> park ranger in uniform Repeat Photography: A Visually Compelling Tool for Documenting Natural Resource Change Repeat photography is an effective method to qualitatively and quantitatively assess landscape change over time. From shrinking glaciers to changing vegetation to changes in the built environment, comparing historical and contemporary photos can help us identify specific features or processes that may require more intensive monitoring and research and can serve as a valuable tool for education, outreach, and resource management. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A historic photo overlaid on a modern image. Making Sound Decisions Using Bioacoustics in Alaska’s National Parks Animals are continuously immersed in acoustic signals. Acoustic recording devices allow us to extend our sense of hearing to remote places, times, and even frequencies we normally cannot access. By studying the sounds animals make, and the sounds in their environment, we can better understand their conservation needs. Presented here are examples from bats, birds, frogs, and whales. Alaska Park Science 20(1), 2021 A man sets up acoustic recording equipment in the backcountry. Series: Alaska Park Science Volume 20 Issue 1 - Parks as Proving Grounds Parks in Alaska pose special challenges to researchers: they are large, remote, and less is known about them. This makes it all the more important that tools and techniques we use here are practical, effective, and impactful. While researchers often focus on sharing the findings from their work, here we shine a light on the devices and approaches used by researchers with attention to the innovation needed to work in Alaska. Alaska Park Science 20 (1), 2021 A scientist uses a probe on the top of a mountain.

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