"Earthlodge" by NPS Photo , public domain

Knife River Indian Villages

National Historic Site - North Dakota

The Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site preserves the historic and archaeological remnants of bands of Hidatsa, Northern Plains Indians. This area was a major trading and agricultural area. Three villages were known to occupy the Knife area. In general, these three villages are known as Hidatsa villages. Broken down, the individual villages are Awatixa Xi'e (lower Hidatsa village), Awatixa and Big Hidatsa village. Awatixa Xi'e is believed to be the oldest village of the three. The Big Hidatsa village was established around 1600.

maps

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lewis & Clark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/knri/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knife_River_Indian_Villages_National_Historic_Site The Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site preserves the historic and archaeological remnants of bands of Hidatsa, Northern Plains Indians. This area was a major trading and agricultural area. Three villages were known to occupy the Knife area. In general, these three villages are known as Hidatsa villages. Broken down, the individual villages are Awatixa Xi'e (lower Hidatsa village), Awatixa and Big Hidatsa village. Awatixa Xi'e is believed to be the oldest village of the three. The Big Hidatsa village was established around 1600. Earthlodge people hunted bison and other game, but were in essence farmers living in villages along the Missouri and its tributaries. The site was a major Native American trade center for hundreds of years prior to becoming an important market place for fur traders after 1750. Plane Fly into Bismarck or Minot, ND. Hazen, ND (15 miles from site) has an airport for small planes. Car One-half mile north of Stanton, ND on County Road 37. One hour northwest of Bismarck, ND and one and a half hours southwest of Minot, ND. Public Transportation Charter and tour bus parking available at Visitor Center parking lot. Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site Visitor Center The Visitor Center is located off Highway 37 just north of the city of Stanton, ND. The Visitor Center’s entrance is in the shape of a giant eagle welcoming visitors. Once inside, visitors can view the movie, tour the exhibits or shop in our bookstore. Outside and behind the Visitor Center is a reconstructed earthlodge (furnished with replica artifacts in the summer) and the beginning of one of the three trails located at the park. One-half mile north of Stanton, ND on County Road 37. One hour northwest of Bismarck, ND and one and a half hours southwest of Minot, ND. Earthlodge Summer view of Earthlodge Summer view of Earthlodge Interior View of Earthlodge Interior View of Earthlodge Interior View of Earthlodge Winter Earthlodge Winter Earthlodge Winter Earthlodge Garden Garden Garden Sakakawea Village Sakakawea Village Sakakawea Village NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site, North Dakota Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] earthlodge Subsistence: Tribal Nutrition & Health This historical background information explains women's influence, plant watchers, processing foods, food storage, food preparation, men's contributions, hunting and foraging, and subsistence today. square container with cylindrical opening on top filled with corn, beans, and squash. Big Hidatasa Village Site The Big Hidatsa Village Site is part of the Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site. Settled from 1740 until about 1850, Big Hidatsa Village is the largest of the Hidatsa communities near the Knife River. It was comprised of approximately 120 circular earth lodges that housed 20 to 30 individuals each. They were set close together, allowing for communal interaction among the inhabitants. 1836 painting of a hidatsa village Plant Community Monitoring at Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site contains 1,758 acres of upland mixed-grass prairie and riparian forest habitats, much of which has a long history of human use. Plant community monitoring is critical for understanding the current health of ecosystems and can provide an early warning of undesirable changes. white flowers with many small oval petals and a yellow center growing up green leafy stems Arts, Crafts, Clothing and Appearance This historical background information explains arts, crafts, and clothing traditions for the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes. It details flint, pottery, basketry, painting, parfleche, quillwork, clothing, footwear, appearance, and singing and dancing. It also explains activity in a modern Hidatsa or Mandan home. Illustration of the underside of a turtle shell and a cylindrical bone piece. Housing This historical background information explains housing traditions for the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes. It details planning, locating, and constructing an earthlodge. It also discusses how the tribes used a tipi. Adult stands inside wood structure of earth lodge. Bat Projects in Parks: Northern Great Plains Inventory and Monitoring Across six Northern Great Plains parks, education and outreach for bats was conducted. View of Badlands National Parks unique rock formations in the distance Outside Science (inside parks): Fire at Knife River Indian Villages Middle school students learn about the role of fire in prairie restoration. two young people plant seeds on the prairie Bat Acoustic Monitoring at Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site protects upland woodlands and cottonwood forests along the Knife and Missouri rivers that provide foraging and roosting habitat for bats. The Northern Great Plains Inventory & Monitoring Network monitors bats at the park to detect long-term trends in bat populations. Bat acoustic recorder on a tripod next to an earthen mound house Transportation This historical background information explains how the Hidatsa and Mandan tribes traveled. It details the bull boat, horse, and dog travois. Illustration of a bull boat History of Hidatsa: Post-1845 This historical background information explains the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation (MHA), pre and post Garrison Dam, health, education in boarding schools, impact of the schools, treating historical trauma, education today, current culture, and native spirituality today of the Hidatsa, Mandan, and Arikara tribes after 1845. Portrait of Chief Bad Gun in headress History of Hidatsa: Pre-1845 This historical background information explains early villages, early explorers, Sacagawea, oral history, education and societies, and tribal origins of the Hidatsa and Mandan tribes before 1845. This is before the tribe moved to Like-A-Fishhook Village. Portrait of Chief Four Dance in full headress ArcheoBlitz The 2016 ArcheoBlitz engaged 250 students in the practice of archeology, encouraged respect for traditional cultures, and gathered useable data that will improve working knowledge and management of archeological sites at Knife River Indian Villages NHS. intern sorting micro-artifacts Hidatsa Women & Earthlodges of the Upper Missouri River In traditional Hidatsa society, women constructed, owned, and maintained the earthlodge, or awadi. The elaborately designed structure was home to between ten and twenty people, often sisters and their families spanning several generations. Today, shallow depressions mark the locations of the earthlodge villages at Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site in North Dakota. An aerial view of a collection of circular depressions in an open landscape beside a river Alisha Deegan: 19th Amendment Centennial Superintendent of Knife River Indian Villages, Alisha Deegan describes her journey with the NPS for the 19th Amendment Centennial. A ranger sits in front of a gray wall. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Plant Community Monitoring in Northern Great Plains Network Parks Plant communities are essential components of all major ecosystems. Plants are the ultimate source of food for other organisms and the main source of organic material in soil and water. They also influence climate and provide the scenery that park visitors enjoy. The NPS Northern Great Plains Network monitors the number, identity, and relative abundance of plant species, as well as their horizontal cover and vertical structure, to determine the health of park ecosystems. Two people sitting on the ground looking at plants Prologue for the Next Century: Archeoblitz and Citizen Science As part of the National Park Service’s (NPS) 2016 centennial celebration, Knife River Indian Villages National Historic Site (KNRI) hosted a citizen science event for middle school students to gather information on archeological resources preserved at the park. Imagining the Lewis and Clark Expedition competing in the Olympics The different members of the Corps of Discovery came from varied, unique backgrounds, and because of those backgrounds brought a variety of useful skills to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Many of the skills and abilities possessed by Corps members translate well to the different events of the modern-day Olympics. As such, we’ve compiled a list of Olympic events, and which members of the Corps of Discovery had the best shot at bringing home gold! Olympic Training Center. Large building with American Flad

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