by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Lake Mead

National Recreation Area - AZ, NV

Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States in terms of water capacity. The reservoir serves water to the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada, providing sustenance to nearly 20 million people and large areas of farmland.

maps

Official visitor map of Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lake Mead - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Trails Map of Cerbat Foothills Recreation Area (RA) in the BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Cerbat Foothills - Trails Map

Trails Map of Cerbat Foothills Recreation Area (RA) in the BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Northern part of BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Kingman - North

Map of the Northern part of BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the Southern part of BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Kingman - South

Map of the Southern part of BLM Kingman Field Office area in Arizona. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Arizona Strip Visitor Map with recreational information for the Arizona Strip, Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (NM), Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), and surrounding areas (Grand Canyon, North Kaibab National Forest, etc). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Arizona Strip - West

Arizona Strip Visitor Map with recreational information for the Arizona Strip, Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (NM), Vermilion Cliffs National Monument (NM), and surrounding areas (Grand Canyon, North Kaibab National Forest, etc). Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Mohave County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Mohave County

Mohave County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Official Nevada State Highway Map. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NVDOT).Nevada State - Nevada State Highway Map

Official Nevada State Highway Map. Published by the Nevada Department of Transportation (NVDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/lake https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Mead_National_Recreation_Area Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States in terms of water capacity. The reservoir serves water to the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada, providing sustenance to nearly 20 million people and large areas of farmland. Swim, boat, hike, cycle, camp and fish at America’s first and largest national recreation area. With striking landscapes and brilliant blue waters, this year-round playground spreads across 1.5 million acres of mountains, canyons, valleys and two vast lakes. See the Hoover Dam from the waters of Lake Mead or Lake Mohave, or find solitude in one of the park's nine wilderness areas. By car you can drive to one of the park's many entrances. The six main entrances to Lake Mead are as follows: Northshore, Lake Mead Boulevard, Lake Mead Parkway, and Boulder, Temple Bar and Meadview. For the southern sections of the park, near Lake Mohave, there are entrance stations at Willow Beach, Katherine Landing and Cottonwood Cove. Lake Mead Visitor Center Before you start your adventure, stop by the Lake Mead Visitor Center. Whether you have one hour or one week, rangers and volunteers will help you plan an unforgettable trip. In addition to grabbing maps and brochures, you can get your National Park passport stamp or become a junior ranger. The Western National Parks Association operates the park store from within the center. It's stocked with books about the park and the region, Native American arts, jewelry and crafts, posters, outerwear and more. From Boulder City take U.S. Highway 93 south to Lakeshore Road. Turn left onto Lakeshore Road and the visitor center will be on your right in approximately 1/4 mile. Boulder Beach Campground The Boulder Beach Campground is located just minutes from Las Vegas along the Boulder Basin of Lake Mead. It’s open year-round and features large paved sites that can accommodate tents or large RVs, along with tables, fire pits and/or grills. These sites are like an oasis, because of the lush vegetation that shades nearly every campsite. There is a mix of palm trees, oleanders, mature cottonwood trees and native vegetation that also helps provide privacy between sites. Campsite Fees 20.00 NPS-managed campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes) and are payable immediately upon occupying a campsite. Fees are posted at the entrance to the campground. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. There are no reservations. Check-out time is noon. For more information about camping, please visit our Camping Page. Boulder Beach Campgrounds Desert landscape with campsites and two rv's. Boulder Beach Campground Boulder Beach Campgrounds Campsite with desert trees and a lake in the background. Boulder Boulder Beach Group Campground When you stay at the Boulder Beach Group Campground, you’ll have access to many recreation opportunities. Boulder Beach, Special Events Beach, Canoe/Kayak Beach and PWC Beach are 1-2 miles away. At these locations you can swim, kayak and jetski. If you prefer to explore the park on land, the River Mountains Loop Trail passes right by the campground. This paved trail is more than 30 miles long and leads to the Historic Railroad Trail. Group sites 80.00 Group campsites fees are $80 per night (15 person minimum - 30 person maximum per site) are located at the Boulder Campground. Camping fees are posted at the campground kiosk. Reservations are required and can be requested online only at rec.gov. Boulder Beach Group Campground Shady campsite in the desert. Boulder Beach Group Campground Callville Bay Campground Callville Bay Campground is just minutes from Las Vegas along the northern edge of the Boulder Basin of Lake Mead. It’s open year-round with paved sites for tents or RVs with trees and vegetation to help with shade and privacy. June-August temps can pass 100F (37C), May and September highs are around 90F (32C) and October-April are much cooler and lows can dip to freezing temps December-February. Nearby hiking trails offer spectacular view of the Lake Mead area and glimpses of local wildlife. Callville Bay Camping sites fee 20.00 Campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes) and are payable immediately upon occupying a campsite. Open/unreserved sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. The campground has a 1-person minimum/8-person maximum per site and one camping unit, i.e., motor home or camp trailer. A maximum of two motorized vehicles, four motorcycles or combination thereof if towed or carried by camper. Callville Bay Tent Camping/picnicking site Photo of a picnic table and fire ring in a cleared area for tent camping with trees. Callville Bay Campground Restrooms Restroom facilities at Callville Bay Campground Callville Bay Campground Access Photo of paved drive around the campsites at Callville Bay Campground Callville Bay RV Park More than 550 miles of pristine shoreline. Soaring red rock cliffs. Countless bays and beaches. Get off the grid for the vacation of a lifetime at Callville Bay Resort & Marina on Lake Mead. Conveniently located within an hour of Las Vegas, Nevada, Callville Bay offers an ideal getaway perfectly complemented by infinite opportunities for adventure and entertainment. Personal watercraft and ski boat rentals are available for a fun-filled day trip, along with multiple houseboat rental options. Cottonwood Cove Campground Cottonwood Campground is located near Searchlight, Nevada, along Lake Mohave. It’s open year-round and features paved sites that can accommodate tents or RVs, along with tables, fire pits and/or grills. Restrooms and water spigots are located throughout the campsite. Temperatures usually surpass 100F (37C) degrees June-August. In May and September, daytime highs are around 90F (32C). October-April, temperatures are much cooler. Lows can dip to freezing temps December-February. The area averages 4 inch Cottonwood Campground Campground with lake and marina in background. Cottonwood Campground Echo Bay Campground Our Echo Bay Park is a fisherman’s and boater’s paradise. Located on the north end of Lake Mead, this secluded park offers a variety of outdoor activities. Close to the “must-see” wonder of the Valley of Fire State Park and the ruins of the historic town of St. Thomas, visitors have an array of hiking and sightseeing opportunities. The large RV sites provide room for your boat, and the free on-site launch ramp are ideal for boaters. Campsite Fees 20.00 Campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes) and are payable immediately upon occupying a campsite. Fees are posted at the entrance to the campground. Sites managed by the National Park Service are available on a first-come, first-served basis. There are no reservations. Check-out time is noon. Echo Bay Campgrounds Campsite with desert trees and a picnic table. Echo Bay Campground Lake Mead RV Village Lake Mead's Boulder Beach area offers many things to see and do. Whether you’d rather go sightseeing, tour Hoover Dam, go shopping, visit historic Boulder City or try your luck in Las Vegas, Lake Mead RV Village at Boulder Beach is conveniently located to a variety of attractions. There’s a lot going on around Lake Mead RV Village, so set up camp and discover this diverse and historically significant area, while enjoying your stay on the shores of Lake Mead. Lake Mead RV Village RV Village Lake Mead RV Village Callville Bay RV Park Callville Bay RV Park Callville Bay RV Park Las Vegas Bay Campground Las Vegas Bay Campground is located just minutes from Las Vegas on the western edge of the park and has lush vegetation that shades nearly every campsite. There is a mix of palm trees, oleanders, mature cottonwood trees and native vegetation that also helps provide privacy between sites. Wildlife in the area includes many species of birds and lizards along with antelope squirrels and the occasional coyote. Campsite Fees 20.00 Campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes). Las Vegas Bay Campgrounds Desert landscape with campsites and bushes. Las Vegas Bay Campgrounds Temple Bar Campground Enjoy the Temple Bar area by land or water. Hike through the desert along the Temple View Trail to observe the crystal blue waters of Lake Mead and the natural temple that changes colors throughout the day. Launch your own boat or rent one from the marina. You can also dine at the seasonal cafe, or grab a variety of snacks, drinks and charcoal from the store. Campsite Fees 20.00 Campground fees are $20 per site ($10 with the Interagency Senior and Access passes). Temple Bar Campground Desert campground with a tent and vegetation. Temple Bar Campground Black Canyon at Lake Mead NRA sun rising on Black Canyon Visit Black Canyon Water Trail for rafting or kayaking Redstone Picnic Area Lake Mead NRA picnic area at Redstone There are many picnic areas at Lake Mead NRA Boating at lakes Mead and Mohave power boaters on Lake Mead Boating is a popular activity at lakes Mead and Mohave Tour Operators Guide You through the Park people on a tour operated craft exploring the lake. There are many tour operators to provide you with an excellent visit to Lake Mead NRA. Bighorn Sheep Enjoying the View at Lake Mead NRA A group of bighorn sheep overlooking Lake Mead. With wilderness comes wildlife. Bighorn sheep can be spotted at most areas of the park. Wounded Veterans Find Healing At Lake Mead Wounded American Veterans Experience SCUBA Project, an organization that helps veterans overcome combat injuries through scuba diving. Just before Veterans Day, they teamed up with the National Park Service’s Submerged Resources Center to conduct their first dive within Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Six veterans prepare to dive into the water. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada and Arizona Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] park road, lake, and mountians 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards National Park Service Visitor and Resource Protection Staff Focuses on Week of Leadership Staff from all levels of the National Park Service in law enforcement, United States Park Police, as well as fire and aviation spent a week learning leadership lessons from one another as well as from a diverse group of leaders during the last week of September 2019. A group of women and men on a rocky outcrop in high desert. Partnerships between Resources and Fire Benefit Cultural Landscapes at Parashant National Monument Over the past several years, the fire program for Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LAKE) and Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument (PARA) has made strides in benefitting cultural and natural resources at both units. Firefighter protects a fence during a prescribed burn National Park Service Aviation Personnel Attend DOI National Pilot Ground School During the week of December 10, 2017, twenty-eight National Park Service (NPS) airplane and helicopter pilots, pilot trainees, national and regional aviation staff attended the 2017 DOI National Pilot Ground School (NPGS). The weeklong training brought together over 100 DOI pilots from the NPS, US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and DOI’s Office of Aviation Services (OAS). A group of 17 men stand in front of a room. Veteran Story: Frank J. La Spina Before becoming a ranger at Lake Mead National Recreation Area Frank J. La Spina served honorably in the Marine Corps, Army and Nevada Army National Guard, medically retiring as an Army sergeant first class. soldier in kevlar by armored vehicle Lake Mead Lesson Plan Writing Retreat The Lesson Plan Writing Retreat invites educators to come together during the summer and to create culturally inclusive lesson plans through seminars and research. A group of people listen to a talk about plants Measuring light pollution across a landscape It takes a special camera to take a special picture—forty-five images in the case of a customized camera used by the National Park Service to document night sky quality. NPS scientists with the Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division (NSNSD) discussed the camera—how it works, what the images reveal, why it is important, and how it advances the NPS mission. Sweeping valley view from a mountain w/clouds and a female scientist installing the NPS camera. World War II Plane Crashes in National Parks During WWII, more than 7,100 air crashes involved US Army Air Force (USAAF) aircraft occurred on American soil. Collectively these crashes resulted in the loss of more than 15,599 lives (Mireles 2006). Many of these military aircraft accidents occurred in remote, often mountainous, areas managed by the National Park Service. plane crash at base of grassy hill Lake Mead National Recreation Area Hosts Latino Conservation Week July 15, Lake Mead National Recreation Area hosted volunteers for a Latino Conservation Week event called “Find Your Roots / Encuentra Tus Raíces.” The event served as an opportunity for participants to explore the park in a unique, educational and service-oriented way. cleaning native seeds Wounded Veterans Find Healing at Lake Mead National Recreation Area Six wounded veterans helped the National Park Service preserve the nation’s history and culture at Lake Mead National Recreation Area Nov. 7-9. At the same time, they found healing. National Park Service Finds Success at Hiring Event The National Park Service Fire and Aviation Program participated in a hiring event sponsored by the Department of Interior. The special hiring event was held in Bakersfield, CA and was a collaboration of all four natural resource management bureaus to hire open wildland fire positions in 2020. Employees talk to potential job candidates in front of a large promotional panel. How Lake Mead Stopped a Potent Invasive Plant Infestation Fountaingrass (Pennisetum setaceum) is an invasive ornamental species planted in several areas of the Southwest. When the staff at Lake Mead discovered the plant near remote mountain springs 12 miles upriver from the original plantings the Lake Mead Invasive Plant Management Team (LAKE IPMT) knew they had to hurry to prevent a dangerous fountaingrass infestation. Travis Fulton, LAKE IPMT, controlling fountain grass on a hillside at Joshua Tree National Park. Paleontology at Lake Mead National Recreation Area Lake Mead NRA is located a few miles east of Las Vegas, and serves as a welcome respite in the blazing heat of the Mojave desert summers. At the forefront of Lake Mead NRA’s conservational efforts are resource protection and education to visitors about the park’s desert wildlife, native fish and invasive species, and cultural history - far lesser known has been the park’s long and important paleontological story. 2 large dark wood logs laying in a rocky landscape Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 10, No. 1, Spring 2018 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology News</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> a piece of rock with small reddish shells embedded in it with black and white rule in foreground Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Park Newspaper Lake Mead National Recreation Area www.nps.gov/lake Lake Mead National Recreation Area Spring 2017 Welcome to America's Most Diverse National Recreation Area Historic Railroad Trail National Recreation Trails Improved Lake Mead National Recreation Area’s two National Recreation Trails, the Historic Railroad Trail and River Mountains Loop Trail, received $380,000 in surface and drainage improvements in 2016 to ensure that the trails are in good condition for years to come. In this desert environment, trails especially highuse trails like these are subject to a lot of use and abuse from the daunting desert environment. The improvements will extend the overall life of the trails, preserving them for future generations. The Historic Railroad Trail was graded and received a new layer of decomposed granite and upgraded drainage that will improve the visitor experience. Accessibility of the trail was also improved by adding compact surface and extending the surface material to cover the rest areas. “The Historic Railroad Trail was designated as a National Recreation Trail a few years ago, and it needed to be made more accessible,” said Carl Bush, park civil engineer and project manager. “The existing trail surface was loose, and there was old railroad ballasts debris from when the tracks were removed. We realized that strollers and wheelchairs struggled with the surface.” Ed Price from the Accessible Trails Foundation was impressed with the improvements. “I did the 2.1 miles from the trailhead to the Bureau of Reclamation boundary and back in my wheelchair. This trail was previously off limits to me. I liked the firmness and its natural, esthetically pleasing appearance. It is beautiful,” he said. “I was especially pleased with the consistent evenness through the tunnels which gave me confidence while safely rolling through the nearly dark places,” he added. “In the spirit of universal design, the trail will be more comfortable for hikers and families because there are no protruding rock tripping hazards or loose coarse gravel.” The River Mountains Loop Trail is a paved trail that connects Lake Mead National Recreation Area, the City of Henderson and Boulder City with 34 miles of trail that surrounds the River Mountains, 17 miles of which are in Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Ten of the 17 miles of trail were repaired, resurfaced or replaced. Over 4,000 square feet of asphalt was poured and 10,000 feet of cracks were sealed according to Bush. The entire 17 miles within the park also received a slurry seal coat to help protect the surface from the damage of harsh summer temperatures that can crack the asphalt. “The River Mountains Loop Trail is a shining example of what can be accomplished when great agency partners like the National Park Service and the community comes together,” said Ron Floth co-chairman, River Mountains Loop Trail Partnership. “The River Mountains Loop Trail provides people from all walks of life an opportunity to experience the vast beauty of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, River Mountains and the Las Vegas Valley. We are constantly receiving compliments on the trail and how lucky we are to have such a great resource right in our own backyards.” While we’re known for our hiking, biking, boating and more, in this issue, we’d like to share some of our park’s lesser-known stories, providing you a more complete picture of the experience you can have in the park. This park was established after the construction of the Hoover Dam. It became the first national recreation area within the National Park Service. In addition to protecting the natural resources across the park’s 1.5 million acres, we have the responsibility to preserve its recreational opportunities. We go to great lengths to help you have a quality, enjoyable experience during your visit to Lake Mead and Lake Mohave. Turn to page 5, to learn how you can visit a town that became covered by water after the construction of the Hoover Dam. On page 6, we share the lesser-known contributions and achievements African Americans made to the construction of the Hoover Dam. For even more history and to view artifacts from our cultural collection, visit www.nps.gov/features/lake/museum to tour our virtual museum. Thank you. Have a safe, enjoyable visit. Lizette Richardson - Superintendent National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Lake Mead National Recreation Area America’s Most Diverse National Recreation Area Lake Mead National Recreation Area provides diverse public recreation, benefit and use on lakes Mead and Mohave and surrounding lands in a manner that preserves the ecological, geological, cultural, historical, scenic, scientific and wilderness resources of the park. Vision To inspire and challenge everyone to find their connection to Lake Mead National Recreation Area and enjoy the adventure. Superintendent Lizette Richardson Park Info

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