Lassen Volcanic

National Park - California

Lassen Volcanic National Park is in northern California. It's rich in hydrothermal sites like Bumpass Hell, with its acres of bubbling mud pots. The summit of Lassen Peak Volcano offers views over the surrounding wilderness. Nearby, the Devastated Area is littered with lava rocks from its last eruption. A network of trails through forest and around several lakes connects with the Pacific Crest Trail in the north.

maps

Official visitor map of Lassen Volcanic National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lassen Volcanic - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lassen Volcanic National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Nobles Emigrant Trail - Trail Map

Map of the Nobles Emigrant Trail section, part of the California National Historic Trail (NHT), located outside of Susanville, California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Winter and Spring edition of the Visitor Guide to Lassen Volcanic National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lassen Volcanic - Winter/Spring 2020/2021

Winter and Spring edition of the Visitor Guide to Lassen Volcanic National Park (NP) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/lavo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lassen_Volcanic_National_Park Lassen Volcanic National Park is in northern California. It's rich in hydrothermal sites like Bumpass Hell, with its acres of bubbling mud pots. The summit of Lassen Peak Volcano offers views over the surrounding wilderness. Nearby, the Devastated Area is littered with lava rocks from its last eruption. A network of trails through forest and around several lakes connects with the Pacific Crest Trail in the north. Lassen Volcanic National Park is home to steaming fumaroles, meadows freckled with wildflowers, clear mountain lakes, and numerous volcanoes. Jagged peaks tell the story of its eruptive past while hot water continues to shape the land. From Interstate 5 (Redding), take Hwy 44 - 48 miles east to the junction of Hwy 89. Follow Hwy 89 south 1 mile to the north entrance of the park. From Interstate 5 (Red Bluff) take Hwy 36 E - 51 miles east to the junction of Hwy 89. Follow Hwy 89 north 6 miles to south entrance of the park. Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center This year-round visitor center is located one mile from the Southwest Entrance. The visitor center offers an information desk, exhibit hall, auditorium, amphitheater, park store, dining area with fireplace, patio, and a gift shop and cafe. Free Wi-Fi is available inside. From Red Bluff: Follow Hwy 36 East for 51 miles to the junction of Hwy 89. Follow Hwy 89 north 6 miles to the southwest entrance station and the Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center. Loomis Museum The historic museum is located one mile from the northwest entrance of the park near Manzanita Lake. The museum is only open during the summer months. Visit for information, to view exhibits and the park film, shop at the park store, or participate in a ranger-led program (offered primarily outside in the adjacent Loomis Plaza). From the museum you can pick up the trail around Manzanita Lake or cross the highway to access the self-guided, interpretive Lily Pond Nature Trail. From Redding, California follow Highway 44 east 50 miles. Turn south on Highway 89 and continue one mile to the park's northwest entrance. From Reno, Nevada follow Highway 395 north to Highway 44. Follow Highway 44 miles west 180 miles. Turn south on Highway 89 and continue one mile to the park's northwest entrance. Butte Lake Campground Butte Lake Campground is located in the NE corner of Lassen Volcanic National Park. The campground is a 45-minute drive from the Northwest Entrance and Manzanita Lake Area and is accessed via the 6-mile-long Butte Lake Road south of highway 44. This remote campground offers few amenities, but numerous recreation opportunities. Enjoy a hike up Cinder Cone or a paddle along Butte Lake's lava rock shores. Reservations are available for most sites and required for group sites and the stock corral. Campsite 22.00 Rate per campsite. Campsite (water off) 15.00 Single campsite when water is not available (early and late season). Group Campsite 62.00 Campsite for a minimum of 10 and a maximum of 25 people and up to six licensed vehicles or one bus/RV. Group (water off) 35.00 Group campsite when water is unavailable (early and late season). Stock corral 37.00 The Butte Lake stock corral is located north of the campground via a short access road and is available by reservation only. Butte Lake boat launch A sandy boat launch area on the edge of a conifer-lined lake. The campground is a short walk from the Butte Lake boat launch. Campground Map A map of a campground showing two loops. Butte Lake Campground contains two loops located near Butte Lake. Restroom at Butte Lake Campground A brown building with restrooms, a utility sink, and a water spigot out front. Three campground restrooms offer a water fountain and spigot and utility sink. Juniper Lake Campground The Juniper Lake Campground is located on the east shore of Juniper Lake via a 13-mile paved/gravel road. All single campsites are first-come, first-served only. Reservations are required for the two group sites and one stock corral. Drinking water is not available. Campsite 12.00 First-come, first-served campsite. Each campsite is equipped with a picnic table, fire grate, bearproof box, and parking area. Electric and water hookups are not available. Vehicles must stay on paved/graveled areas. No water is available in the campground. Group Campsite 32.00 Tent camping only. Group site capacity is limited to a minimum of 10, and a maximum of 15 people, and up to six licensed vehicles. Each group campsite is equipped with three picnic tables, three fire grates, three metal food lockers, and a parking area. No water is available in the campground. Stock Corral 30.00 Two metal panel corrals. Only one stock party is assigned to the site at one time. Group site capacity is limited to a maximum of 10 people, 8 animals, and 4 licensed vehicles, which include trailers. Stock parties must camp at the corral campsite. Hitch rails are not provided. Portable corrals are not allowed except within designated corral enclosure areas. Juniper Lake Group Site Trash receptacles and picnic tables amid conifer trees on the edge of a mountain lake. Two group sites are located off a spur of the campground road. Meadow campsite A campsite amid conifer trees adjacent to a grassy area. Campsites on southern side of the campground road have meadow views. Campground Map A map of the campground indicating sites branching off a single road. Juniper Lake Campground is located adjacent to Juniper Lake. Lakeside campsite A picnic table, fire ring, and metal bear box at a campsite amid conifer trees on a lakeshore. Many sites are adjacent to Juniper Lake Campsite A picnic table in conifer trees near the grassy shore of a mountain lake. Juniper Lake Campground is on the eastern shore of Juniper Lake. Evening at Juniper Lake Campground A photo of a kayak and row boat on the short of a moonlit, mountain lake. Campers can launch boats from Juniper Lake Campground. Lost Creek Group Campground Lost Creek Group Campground contains only group campsites. All sites are reservation-only. The campground is located five miles south of Manzanita Lake on the park highway. The campground offers easy access to Manzanita Lake, Devastated, and Summit Lake Areas. Group campsite 62.00 Group campsite capacity is limited to a minimum of 10, a maximum of 25 people, and up to 6 vehicles or one bus/RV. Each group campsite is equipped with three picnic tables, three fire grates, three metal food lockers, and a parking area. Lost Creek campsite A large picnic tent next to two picnic tables with camping chairs and three brown metal bear boxes. Each campsite includes three food lockers, picnic tables, and fire grates. Lost Creek Group Campground Map A map of an oval loop with 8 campsites. Lost Creek Campground contains only group sites. Manzanita Lake Campground Manzanita Lake Campground is located one mile east of the Manzanita Lake Entrance and is the largest campground in the park. This popular campground is ideal for families, RVs, and trailers. Located adjacent to Manzanita Lake, campers can enjoy swimming, fishing, kayaking, and hiking. This campground is open the longest except for the year-round Southwest Walk-in Campground. The campground includes rustic camping cabins and group campsites, both of which are available by reservation only. Campsite 26.00 Single campsite for a maximum of 3 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RVs). Campsite (water off) 15.00 Single campsite when water is not available. Limited to a maximum of 3 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RVs). Group campsite 72.00 Group site joining two or more adjacent campsites (B20-22, B24-27, B28-30, B31-32, B33-34). Limited to 10-25 people and 6 vehicles (including RVs). One-room camping cabin 76.00 One-room rustic camping cabin available by reservation only. All cabins include bed(s), propane heater, battery-powered lantern, bear proof food storage box, fire ring, and picnic table. Central restrooms and showers are located nearby. Both shower areas have an ADA accessible stall with bench seat and hand rails. ADA accessible cabins with ramps are also available. The mattress provided are 3 inches and firm so we encourage you to bring additional bedding; sleeping bags, comforters and blankets. Two-room camping cabin 101.00 Two-room rustic camping cabin available by reservation only. All cabins include bed(s), propane heater, battery-powered lantern, bear proof food storage box, fire ring, and picnic table. Central restrooms and showers are located nearby. Both shower areas have an ADA accessible stall with bench seat and hand rails. ADA accessible cabins with ramps are also available. The mattress provided are 3 inches and firm so we encourage you to bring additional bedding; sleeping bags, comforters and blankets. Bunkhouse camping cabin 95.00 Bunkhouse rustic camping cabin available by reservation only. All cabins include bed(s), propane heater, battery-powered lantern, bear proof food storage box, fire ring, and picnic table. Central restrooms and showers are located nearby. Both shower areas have an ADA accessible stall with bench seat and hand rails. ADA accessible cabins with ramps are also available. The mattress provided are 3 inches and firm so we encourage you to bring additional bedding; sleeping bags, comforters and blankets. Camping cabin (accessible) A woman sits in a wheelchair and a man stands at a picnic table backed by a small, wooden cabin. Four accessible camping cabins offer a ramp and wheelchair-accessible picnic table. Camping cabin The rear of a wooden cabin in a forest with a partial view of a lake. The camping cabin loop is adjacent to Manzanita Lake. Section of E-Loop A paved road lined by campsites containing trailers and vehicles. A limited number of campsites can accommodate RVs and trailers. Group campsite A large group of people pose for a photo at a campsite. Group campsites combine two or three adjacent single sites. Campground Map A map of a campground showing five loops connected by a road to the right. Manzanita Lake Campground contains five loops. Southwest Walk-In Campground The Southwest Walk-in Campground is located on the east side of the Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center parking area. A short walk along a paved walkway provides easy access to each site. When snow is on the ground (approximately Nov-May), the location of the Southwest Campground changes to an over-the-snow area south of the Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center parking area. Winter camping registration is located at the fee booth located south of the parking area. Campsite 16.00 Single walk-in campsite limited to a maximum of 3 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RVs). Campsite (water off) 10.00 Single campsite when water is not available. Limited 3 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RVs). Camping in vehicle 16.00 Camping in a self-contained vehicle in the adjacent parking area only. Please park between islands. Camping in vehicle (no water) 10.00 Camping in a self-contained vehicle in the adjacent parking area only when water is not available. Please park between islands. Campsite A green tent, two blue chairs, and a brown bear box All campsites are accessed by a short walk from the parking area. Restroom and Summer/Fall Registration Two people walk along a paved pathway toward a small brown building. A registration area and restroom are available in the summer and fall seasons. Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center Parking Area A parking area with vehicles parked on the edges and a building at the far end. The campground is adjacent to the Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center parking area. Campground Map A map of the campground indicating sites of a walkway to the right of a large parking area. Southwest Walk-in Campground is adjacent to the Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center. Winter Map A map of a parking area, campground, and visitor center indicating closures and routes for snow. Oversnow tent camping is located south of the parking area in the winter months, approximately November through May. Summit Lake North Campground Summit Lake North Campground is located on the north side of Summit Lake at about the middle point of the 30-mile park highway. The campground includes loop A and B. Additional campsites are located in three loops on the south side of the lake in Summit Lake South Campground. A picnic area is located on the shore and features a swimming area, picnic tables, and day use parking. Campsite 24.00 Single campsite for a maximum of 3 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RVs). Horse corral 37.00 The Summit Lake horse corral is located across the highway and is available by reservation only. Summit Lake North Campsite Two tents, two chairs, and a picnic table at a campsite in trees with a restroom to the right. A campsite at Summit Lake North Campground. Summit Lake North picnic area People sit and stand on a grassy shore of a mountain lake. Swimming is popular on the north shore of Summit Lake. North Summit Lake Campground Map A map of a campground with two side-by-side loops A and B and a day use area on the shore of lake. Summit Lake North includes a picnic area on the lakeshore. Summit Lake South Campground Summit Lake South Campground is located on the south side of Summit Lake at about the middle point of the 30-mile park highway. The campground contains loops C, D, and E (tents only). Additional campsites are located in two loops on the north side of the lake in Summit Lake North Campground. Campsite 22.00 Single campsite for a maximum of 3 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RVs). Campsite (water off) 15.00 Single campsite when water is unavailable. Limited to 3 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RVs). Campsite A tree-lined campsite with a tent and metal bear box . Some campsites backup to meadow areas. South Summit Lake Campground Map A map of a campground with three vertically stacked loops numbered C through E. Summit Lake South Campground Map Summit Lake from the south shore A blue lake fronted by green and yellow meadow, lined by conifers, and backed by a round, volcanic p A view of Summit Lake from Summit Lake South Campground. Warner Valley Campground The campground is located one mile north of Warner Valley Ranger Station via a gravel road and 17 miles north of Chester. Not recommended for trailers. Numerous trailheads are located nearby. Campsite 21.00 Single campsite for a maximum of 3 tents, 6 people, and 2 vehicles (including RVs). Warner Valley Campground Map A map showing a campground along a spur road with 18 sites. This small campground is perched on at the base of Flatiron Ridge. Winter at Manzanita Lake A frozen lake below snow-covered trees and peak With over 30 feet of snowfall annually, Lassen provides numerous opportunities for winter recreation. Hat Creek Golden grasses edge a pond reflecting a snow-dusted peak Lassen Volcanic's rugged volcanic landscape is softened by numerous meadows, lakes, and creeks. Bumpass Hell A boardwalk passes through a colorful, steaming hydrothermal basin. A 3-mile round-trip trail leads to Bumpass Hell, the largest of the park's hydrothermal areas. Brokeoff Panorama Two hikers sit on a mountain top with a view of multiple peaks, dotted with patches of snow Over 150 miles of trails let you choose your adventure. Deep Blue A volcanic peak rises above a tree-lined, deep blue lake. Lassen Peak stands out boldly between the bright blue sky and the sapphire hue of Lake Helen. A Fisherman's Paradise A fisherman casts a line from a boat below a snow-dotted volcanic peak. Manzanita Lake offers spectacular catch-and-release fishing in the shadow of volcanoes. Lassen Peak Eruption An ash cloud rises above a volcano with an early 19th century vehicle at the forefront. A large, explosive eruption of Lassen Peak brought national attention and set the stage for the establishment of Lassen Peak. California Tortoiseshell Clouds of California Tortoiseshells sometimes appear in the park during populations burst or mass migrations. An orange and black California Groundcone Curious about the California groundcone in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Purple groundcone standing next to similar looking Douglas-fir cone. 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Carpenter Ant Curious about carpenter ants? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. close up photo of carpenter ant NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Lassen Volcanic National Park, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] geothermal landscape Managing Bull Thistle in Disturbed Areas of Lassen Volcanic National Park Steve Buckley of the California Exotic Plant Management Team shares a story of success in invasive species management. Bull thistle removal in Lassen Volcanic NP. A Plant to Call Our Own Lassen Paintbrush (Castilleja lassenesis) may be one of two endemic plant species found almost exclusively in Lassen Volcanic National Park. Magenta paintbrush-like flowers in green grass Forecasting Water from Snow Snow water equivalent forecasts provide valuable information for recreation, agriculture, flood management, and hydroelectric power generation. How is snowpack measured and how is that information used? A man stand on top of a snowplow flanked by 15+-foot-height cut snow foot Wild and Scenic Rivers Two Wild and Scenic Rivers flow near Lassen Volcanic National Park including one of the original designations made 50 years ago. A narrow sliver of blue river cuts through a steep and wide, tree-lined river basin Crescent Crater Military Plane Crash Friends and family honor the eight servicemen who lost their lives in a military plane crash on Crescent Crater in Lassen Volcanic National Park in 1951. Black and white photograph of airplane wreckage on hillside Aviation Support for “Reach the Peak” Project The fire management staff at Lassen Volcanic National Park organized a successful, accident-free, aviation operation to support the restoration and rehabilitation of the Lassen Peak Trail. The park’s Branch of Fire and Aviation orchestrated an airlift operation including more than 700 sling loads over a period of eight days. The aviation operation transported more than 2.1 million pounds of rock from the peak parking lot to five different locations on the historic trail. Bulldozer filling bucket with large rocks 2015 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Meet the recipients of the 2015 Freeman Tilden Awards, the highest National Park Service honor for interpretation, and learn more about their exciting programs. Ernie Price Pileated Woodpecker Curious about the pileated woodpecker in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Face and front of a woodpecker, with black body, red crest, and small blue berry in its beak. Pikas in Peril The National Park Service stewards pika populations in more than a dozen parks and seeks to understand the vulnerability of pikas and other mountain species to climate change. Pikas in Peril, funded in 2010, was a collaborative research program directed by scientists from the National Park Service, Oregon State University, University of Idaho, and University of Colorado-Boulder. Profile of a pika on rough, dark red lava rock. © Michael Durham Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Rough-legged Hawk Curious about our wintering visitor to Oregon and California, the rough-legged hawk? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Large hawk in flight with dark and light coloring underneath. 2003 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2003 Environmental Achievement Awards 2007 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2007 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Tracking One of California's Rarest Mammals In the winter of 2018, researchers captured one male and two female Sierra Nevada red foxes in and around Lassen Volcanic National Park. These three foxes are the first of the subspecies captured in over a decade and offer hope of better understanding this state-listed threatened species. A man crouches behind a woman kneeling who is releasing a red fox into a snow-covered forest. Vascular plant hyperdiversity in high-elevation riparian communities of National Park Service units in the Klamath Network Monitoring data provide evidence of high vascular plant diversity in riparian environments. This surprising pattern indicates a high conservation significance of these park environments. Stream and forest scene at Lassen Volcanic National Park (Credit: NPS Photo) Park Air Profiles - Lassen Volcanic National Park Air quality profile for Lassen Volcanic National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Lassen Volcanic NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Lassen Volcanic NP. Trail in Lassen Volcanic National Park Short-eared Owl Curious about the short-eared owl in Oregon and California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Owl with short feather tufts above eyes, buffy, streaked breast, and brownish body. Giant Water Bug Curious about giant water bugs in Oregon and California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network.” Brown, flattened but with many whitish, columnar eggs attached to its back. Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Volcanic Legacy Scenic Byway One of only 42 All American Roads in the Nation, the 500-mile route connects Lassen Volcanic and Crater Lake National Parks. The volcanic activity of the Cascade Mountain Range has created unique geological formations that can only be seen in this part of America. A white car on a mountain road with a large mountain in the background Ladybug Curious about ladybugs in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Cluster of small orange ladybug beetles with black spots on their backs, on vegetation. Checking Lassen's Vital Signs In 2010, the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network—a small team of NPS scientists—began monitoring natural resources, called "vital signs," in Lassen Volcanic and nearby parks. Vital signs indicate park health and serve as red flags if conditions deteriorate. Results from monitoring these vital signs support park managers’ efforts to make science-based management decisions. Learn about the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Division and its work in Lassen Volcanic National Park. Pink flowers border a mountain lake surrounded by forest, with mountains in the background. Sandhill Crane Curious about the sandhill crane in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Two large grayish-brown cranes stand together with wings outspread Anna's Hummingbird Curious about the Anna's hummingbird in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Small, green hummingbird with narrow bill and iridescent rose-colored feathers on throat and crown. Volunteer Story: The Renaissance Couple Greg and Annette Brahms have donated nearly 6,000 volunteer hours at Lassen Volcanic National Park in more than a decade of service. What fuels their love for Lassen? A man and woman stand together on a hiking a trail on rocky hillside backed by a mountain peak.. Parks, pikas, and physiological stress: Implications for long-term monitoring of an NPS climate-sensitive sentinel species Baseline values of physiological stress can be incorporated into monitoring plans for pikas, providing park managers with additional information related to the vulnerability of this climate-sensitive model species that occurs within a large number of western parks. American pika (Copyright Dick Orleans) Orange Sulphur Curious about the orange sulphur butterfly in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Yellowish-orange butterfly with dark band along the wing edges perches with wings open. Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Ruffed Grouse Curious about the ruffed grouse in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Grouse with reddish brown and white mottling and streaking, a head crest and a dark tail band. Lassen Peak Lookout Lassen Peak Lookout was gradually destroyed by lava rocks catapulted from Lassen Peak's crater during its 1914-1915 eruptions. A white, wooden building on a rocky summit. Making Sense of Monitoring Data: Whitebark Pine Conditions in the Southern Cascades Klamath Network botanist, Sean Smith, has been monitoring whitebark pine conditions in two network parks since 2012. Jenell Jackson, the graduate student he worked with early on, recently coauthored a paper with Smith and other scientists in the journal <em>Forests</em> sharing what they’ve learned about whitebark pine. Their study aims to support park managers grappling with how best to protect this increasingly threatened tree in the southern Cascades. Close-up of tree bark covered in orange blisters. Celebrating 50 Years of National Trails Lassen Volcanic National Park all three types of National Trails and seven National Trails are located in or adjacent to the park. A group of seven hikers stands on the summit of a cinder cone volcano Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Whitebark Pine - Featured Creature Curious about the whitebark pine? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Gray and white bird with black wings digs into a pine cone on the end of a pine branch. Quaternary Period—2.58 MYA to Today Massive ice sheets advanced and retreated across North America during much of the Quaternary, carving landscapes in many parks. Bering Land Bridge National Preserve contains geologic evidence of lower sea level during glacial periods, facilitating the prehistoric peopling of the Americas. The youngest rocks in the NPS include the lava of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and the travertine at Yellowstone National Park, which can be just a few hours old. fossil bone bed and murals of mammoths Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Wildland Fire in Lodgepole Pine The bark of lodgepoles is thin, which does not protect the trunks from scorching by fire. They die easily when a fire passes through. However, the serotinous cones give lodgepole pine a special advantage for spreading seeds for the next generation. Close-up of the needles of a lodgepole pine. Douglas's Squirrel Curious about the Douglas's squirrel in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Medium-sized squirrel with tawny belly, gray back, whitish eye ring, and tufts on ears, in a tree. Scientist Profile: Alice Chung-MacCoubrey, Biologist and I&M Program Manager Meet Alice Chung-MacCoubrey, ecologist and program manager for the Klamath Inventory & Monitoring Network! Discover how Alice followed her passion for wildlife and the outdoors to the National Park Service Inventory & Monitoring Program, and learn about her work studying bats. Biologist holds bat with gloved hands. Sculpins Curious about sculpins in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore their natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Fish with large head, large pectoral fins, and mottled, brown, orange, and pale green colors. Plan Like a Park Ranger - Lassen Volcanic Top 10 Tips Plan Like A Park Ranger - Top 10 Tips for Visiting Lassen Volcanic A person in an orange boat fishes on a lake below a snow-capped volcanic peak. Vaux's Swift Curious about the Vaux's swift in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. A small, pale brown, cigar-shaped bird with narrow, pointed wings, in flight. Coast Douglas-fir Curious about Douglas-fir in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly "Featured Creature," brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Six people in front of a very large Douglas-fir at Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve. American Black Bear Curious about the American black bear in southern Oregon and northern California? Explore its natural history in this edition of our monthly “Featured Creature,” brought to you by the Klamath Inventory and Monitoring Network. Black-colored black bear with a dandelion in its mouth.
Lassen Volcanic Winter/Spring Guide Visitors at the sledding area behind the Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center in the Southwest Area. Welcome! Lassen Volcanic National Park receives as much as 30 feet of snow in its winter season. The resulting snowpack often lasts more than half of the year (approximately November to June). Despite the heavy snowfall, sunny skies are common between storms. These windows of "blue bird" days provide excellent opportunities to explore the park by snowshoe or ski or to simply enjoy the sights and sounds of winter. Vehicle Access The Manzanita Lake and Southwest Areas of the park are accessible throughout the winter season. Visitors can travel two miles from SR-44 to the Loomis Plaza in the Manzanita Lake Area or five miles north of SR-36 to the Kohm Yahmah-nee Visitor Center in the Southwest Area (see map on page 3). The park highway is closed to through traffic due to snow approximately November through May. During heavy winters, the highway may close to through traffic as early as late-October and open as late as mid-July. Other park roads to Juniper Lake, Butte Lake, and Warner Valley Areas are also closed in winter. Two routes around the park connect the Manzanita Lake and Southwest Areas. Travel time is approximately 90 minutes to 2 hours in normal winter driving conditions. Learn more on page 8. Inside this Guide Content Page Manzanita Lake Area Steep slopes and sweeping vistas abound in the Southwest Area of the park. Beginning at 6,700 feet elevation, this area receives the most snow. The visitor center here is an excellent first stop for new winter explorers. See page 3 for location. Manzanita Lake Area (5,800 elevation) consists of gentle slopes and scenic lakes. It offers the easiest routes for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing in the park. See page 3 for location. Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center The plaza includes a heated restroom, pay phone, and informational signage. The far end of the plaza is one of multiple access points for the Manzanita Lake loop. Access to exhibits and the park film may be limited due to COVID-19 response. The information desk and park store are available when the building is open. See hours on page 2. Light snacks and hot drinks are available on weekends only between 11 am and 2 pm. Sulphur Works Hydrothermal Area This 1.8-mile loop offers spectacular views of Lassen Peak and Chaos Crags. Pick up the trail anywhere between the entrance station and Loomis Plaza. This trail follows a narrow shoreline and is not recommended for skiing. More on page 6. Experience the sights, sounds, and smells of the park's most accessible hydrothermal area. Snowshoe or ski one mile from the visitor center along the snow-covered park highway to reach this steamy spot. Learn more on page 7. 3 General Information 4 Winter Wildlife 5 Manzanita Lake Area Winter Routes 6 Backcountry Skiing/Snowboarding Southwest Winter Routes 7 Winter Travel 8 Experienced backcountry users will appreciate the spectacular terrain and uncommon solitude in the Southwest Area. Learn more about avalanche safety and routes on page 7. @LassenNPS #FindYourPark Manzanita Lake Snowshoe Route Smaller, gentler slopes are located directly behind the visitor center. Steeper slopes are accessed via a short walk along the snow-covered park highway. Sled with caution; sledding is the number one cause of visitor injury in the winter season. Winter Preparedness and Safety Share Your Experience Loomis Plaza Sledding/Snow Play Area 2 Visit nps.gov/lavo Email lavo_information@nps.gov Call (530) 595-4480 Write P.O. Box 100, Mineral, CA 96063 Winter/Spring 2020 - 2021 Southwest Area Facilities and Services Need More Help? National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Maintain a safe distance from hydrothermal features. Visitors have been severely burned by hot mud and water. Ranger-led Snowshoe Walks Postponed until 2022 Ranger-led snowshoe walks will not be offered this year due to COVID-19 response. Cross-Country Skiing The snow-covered park highway is the most popular cross-country ski route in the park. The Manzanita Lake Area offers a gentler and more gradual climb than in the Southwest Area. There are no groomed trails in the park, however ski tracks often last between storms along this wellshaded corridor. Learn more on page 6. Sledding Areas Small hills on the northern shore of Manzanita Lake and in the Chaos Jumbles Area can be fun with small children or those new to sledding. Steeper terrain can be found at the popular Eskimo Hill snow play area located 1.2 miles east of the park turnoff on SR-44/89 (map on page 3). Sled with caution; sledding is the number one cause of visitor injury in the winter season. This visitor guide is made possible through the support of the Lassen Association. Facilities and Services Availability of Facilities and Services Services Southwest Area Manzanita Lake Area M Information Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Cen

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