"Fort Clatsop in Winter" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Lewis and Clark

National Historical Park - OR, WA

The Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks, in the vicinity of the mouth of the Columbia River, commemorate the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Administration of the parks is a cooperative effort of the United States National Park Service and the states of Oregon and Washington, and was dedicated on November 12, 2004. After reaching the Pacific Ocean, the Corps of Discovery camped at Fort Clatsop in the winter of 1805–1806. The parks also preserve several landing sites on the north bank of the river in Washington, and other sites in Oregon.

maps

Map of the Northern part of the Northwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.Northwest Oregon - North 2019

Map of the Northern part of the Northwest Oregon Protection District. Published by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lewis & Clark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/lewi/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_and_Clark_National_and_State_Historical_Parks The Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks, in the vicinity of the mouth of the Columbia River, commemorate the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Administration of the parks is a cooperative effort of the United States National Park Service and the states of Oregon and Washington, and was dedicated on November 12, 2004. After reaching the Pacific Ocean, the Corps of Discovery camped at Fort Clatsop in the winter of 1805–1806. The parks also preserve several landing sites on the north bank of the river in Washington, and other sites in Oregon. Explore the timeless rainforests and majestic coastal vistas. Discover the rich heritage of the native people. Unfold the dramatic stories of America's most famous explorers. The park encompasses sites along the Columbia River and the Pacific Coast. Follow in the footsteps of the explorers and have an adventure in history. The main site of Fort Clatsop is located south of Astoria just over Youngs Bay, east of the town of Warrenton, and approximately 14 miles north of Seaside. Our satellite sites include: Netul Landing, located 1.25 miles south of the main Fort Clatsop site. Middle Village, located on the 101 left off the Astoria-Megler Bridge. Dismal Nitch, located on the 401 right off the Astoria-Megler Bridge. The Salt Works, located off the Lewis and Clark Way in Seaside, Oregon. Keep an eye out for brown signs. Fort Clatsop Visitor Center The Fort Clatsop Visitor Center is the first stopping spot for your visit to Fort Clatsop. The rangers inside are able to provide brochures and hiking trail maps of our site and the local area as well as take entrance fees or park passes. An exhibit hall detailing the Corps of Discoveries journey and the local Indigenous people can be found inside alongside a movie theater. The LCNHPA's Bookstore is found inside, offering a wide selection of historical books and gifts. Fort Clatsop A fifty foot square wooden fort surrounded by tall trees in a forest. The second replica of Fort Clatsop is the main attraction at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park Fort Clatsop Visitor Center and Sign A wooden rectangular sign reading Fort Clatsop eclipsing a wide one story building and flag pole The entrance sign and Fort Clatsop visitor center marks the main entrance point to the replica of Fort Clatsop itself. Fort Clatsop Main Entrance Sign A wooden sign standing as a tall rectangle, the words Fort Clatsop carved of wood placed on it. The entrance sign at the Visitor Center was created in a style that reflects the actual Fort itself, wooden stakes and all. Netul River Trail Bridge Looking directly down a short railed bridge towards a calm river surrounded by leafless trees. The Netul River Trail follows 1.25 miles of river and crosses over inlets that salmon and other fish rest at. Canoe Bow on the Netul River The front end of a canoe on a river, the water still and reflecting large trees and clouds. Paddling on the Lewis and Clark River allows visitors to experience the site from an entirely different perspective, the tidal influenced waters are often gentle and serene. Sunset at Middle Village A raised platform with historical information panels being cast in the shadow of a bright sunset Middle Village / Station Camp was an important spot for both the Chinook and the Corps of Discovery Running on History Runners along a fern and tree-lined trail Runners compete in a friendly race along a fern and tree-lined trail. The Journey On May 14, 1804, the expedition was officially underway. The party numbered more than 45, and their ages ranged from 17 to 35, with an average age of 27. On July 30 the Corps set up camp near what would become Fort Atkinson, and shortly after Lewis and Clark had made contact with the Oto and Missouria. On August 3 they held the first formal meeting between representatives of the U.S. Government and western tribes. 1871 photo of Nez Perce tribal member in front of tipis Connecting with Our Homelands in 2019 Throughout the 2019 academic year, Hopa Mountain, in partnership with the National Park Service, awarded Connecting with our Homelands travel grants to 21 different indigenous organizations, schools, and nonprofits. These are glimpses into some of these trips. Students look at a forested landscape. American Coot Many people confuse the American Coot with different species of ducks. In fact, Captain Lewis, when writing in March 1806 at Fort Clatsop, called the coot a “black duck.” black bird with white beak Moths of the North Coast & Cascades Moths are insects and members of the taxonomic order of Lepidoptera. They and their larvae provide food for other insects, fish, and animals, and they are pollinators for many nocturnally flowering plants. Over the last five years, parks in the North Coast and Cascades Network have conducted Bioblitzes to begin developing species lists of moths in our parks. Scribe moth specimen Lewis and Clark Leaving Fort Clatsop Today, March 22, 1806, Coboway, chief of the Clatsop people, made his final visit to Fort Clatsop, knowing the men of the Corps were making their final preparations for departure. wooden fort Bees of the North Coast & Cascades Bees are some of the most abundant and important pollinators in the world – especially in mountainous environments. Despite the importance of bees in our natural environments, many national parks do not know what species live within their boundaries. In 2016, to celebrate the Centennial of the National Park Service, North Coast and Cascades national parks focused on inventories of pollinators, including bees. Macro photo of the metallic blue head of a mason bee Badgers A badger was killed by Joseph Field north of today’s Omaha, Nebraska, on July 30, 1804. Captain Clark wrote a short journal entry about it, but Meriwether Lewis, during the long winter of 1805-06 at Fort Clatsop, wrote a lengthy description of the American badger, Taxidea taxus. badger with stripes on face Keelie at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park Hello from Lewis and Clark National Historical Park near Astoria, Oregon. toy dog near fort Syrphid Flies of the North Coast & Cascades Syrphid flies, also known as hoverflies or flower flies, feed on nectar or pollen and are frequently observed on flowers in subalpine and alpine ecosystems. However, there is little research on their distribution or importance as pollinators. In 2014, Dr. Jessica Rykken conducted pollinator surveys in Olympic National Park and North Cascades National Park Service Complex, and documented 57 taxa of syrphid flies. A syrphid fly with yellow and black coloration similar to that of a wasp 1997–1998 El Niño / 1998–1999 La Niña Wind-driven waves and abnormally high sea levels contributed to hundreds of millions of dollars in flood and storm damage in the San Francisco Bay region, including Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Pinnacles National Monument. In addition to California, the 1997–1998 El Niño and the following 1998–1999 La Niña severely impacted the Pacific Northwest, including many National Park System units. colorful ocean surface mapping image Pacific Border Province The Pacific Border straddles the boundaries between several of Earth's moving plates on the western margin of North America. This region is one of the most geologically young and tectonically active in North America. The generally rugged, mountainous landscape of this province provides evidence of ongoing mountain-building. Drakes Estero in Point Reyes National Seashore. NPS photo/Sarah Codde Color the Trail: Animals of Lewis and Clark Color the Trail: Animals features animals of the trail and their names in Chinuk Wawa, Lakota, Arikara, Shoshoni, Osage, Hidatsa, Blackfoot, Nimipuutimt, and Mandan. More than 65 tribes have a connection with the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Download, print, and color the pages. color the trail graphic with lewis and clark national historic trail logo Conserving pinnipeds in Pacific Ocean parks in response to climate change The evolutionary record from previous climate perturbations indicates that marine mammals are highly vulnerable but also remarkably adaptable to climatic change in coastal ecosystems. Consequently, national parks in the Pacific, from Alaska to Hawaii, are faced with potentially dramatic changes in their marine mammal fauna, especially pinnipeds (seals and sea lions). black harbor seal How are Landbird Populations Doing in the North Coast and Cascades Network? Landbirds are one of the vital signs monitored in five national parks of the North Coast and Cascades Network. Two recent studies show that for species with discernible trends, most populations are stable or even increasing. A greenish-yellow bird singing from a perch Bat Projects in Parks: North Coast Cascades Network Eleven bat species occur in North Coast Cascades Network Parks. Each species is unique, except that they're all facing threats of some kind in their environments. Learn more about how scientists study bats and what you can do to help. Visual Representations of Sacagawea As we count down to the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which was signed into law on Aug. 26, 1920, we’re taking a closer look at modern images of the Shoshone woman who accompanied the Corps. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Lewis And Clark National and State Historical Parks, Washington and Oregon Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] fort clatsop Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Coastal Geomorphology—Storms of Record Storms can bring about significant coastal change as well as substantial economic damage and loss in the human environment. Read about a few storms of interest that have since made history due to their unique intensity, characteristics, or impacts. aerial view of a major storm along the northwest coast of the united states and canada Series: Physiographic Provinces Descriptions of the physiographic provinces of the United States, including maps, educational material, and listings of Parks for each. George B. Dorr, founder of Acadia National Park Sacagawea's Voice and the 19th Amendment As we count down to the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which was signed into law on Aug. 26, 1920, we’re taking a closer look at the Shoshone woman who accompanied the Corps, Sacagawea, whose opinion or vote was documented in the journals, a century before women and Native Americans could vote. Data Manager Profile: Kristen Bonebrake Meet Kristen Bonebrake, Data Manager for the North Coast and Cascades Network Inventory & Monitoring Network, and discover the important role that data managers play in protecting the natural resources of our parks! Explore Kristen's journey—from counting roadkill as an intern at Saguaro National Park, to collaborating with bright minds around the country to solve the complex challenges facing our nation's most special places. Kristen kneels on a rock in front of a dramatic snow-capped mountain scene. First Archaeological Investigations of Fort Astoria While the site of Fort Astoria in Oregon has been listed as a National Historic Landmark (NHL) since the 1960s, archaeologists had never performed methodical excavations at the site. In 2020, the regional NHL program published a report from an archaeology field school that detailed three archaeological sites associated with the NHL. This work greatly expanded our understanding of the fur trade and its aftermath at the mouth of the Columbia River. Two people digging and sifting through soil in search of artifacts. Top 10 Tips for Lewis and Clark National Historical Park The top ten tips for visitors planning a trip to Lewis and Clark National Historical Park. A family of 4 walks along a boardwalk over a grassy area on a cloudy day. West Coast National Parks Work with NOAA to Better Understand Ocean Acidification in the Rocky Intertidal and Beyond Ocean acidification (OA) is a huge threat to marine life. But it is hard to track remotely on a large scale. So this summer, seven West Coast national parks are teaming up with the 2021 NOAA West Coast Ocean Acidification Cruise. They’ll collect water samples in-person to check several OA indicators. Their data will help paint the most detailed picture yet of OA conditions up and down the coast, from parks’ rocky intertidal zones to dozens of miles offshore. Collage of different rocky intertidal creatures photographed against a white background. Imagining the Lewis and Clark Expedition competing in the Olympics The different members of the Corps of Discovery came from varied, unique backgrounds, and because of those backgrounds brought a variety of useful skills to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Many of the skills and abilities possessed by Corps members translate well to the different events of the modern-day Olympics. As such, we’ve compiled a list of Olympic events, and which members of the Corps of Discovery had the best shot at bringing home gold! Olympic Training Center. Large building with American Flad Meriwether Lewis Shot in the Buttocks Meriwether Lewis had plenty of near-death experiences during the Expedition: there was that one day when he nearly slid off a cliff; the afternoon he almost poisoned himself with mineral samples; the time a grizzly chased him into the Missouri; and then there was the fateful day he was shot by one of his own men.

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