"Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument" by NPS / Victoria Stauffenberg , public domain

Little Bighorn Battlefield

National Monument - Montana

Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument preserves the site of the June 25 and 26, 1876, Battle of the Little Bighorn, near Crow Agency, Montana, in the United States. It also serves as a memorial to those who fought in the battle: George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry and a combined Lakota-Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho force. Custer National Cemetery, on the battlefield, is part of the national monument. The site of a related military action led by Marcus Reno and Frederick Benteen is also part of the national monument, but is about 3 miles (5 km) southeast of the Little Bighorn battlefield.

maps

Official visitor map of Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (NM) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Little Bighorn Battlefield - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (NM) in Montana. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.Montana State - Montana Highway Map

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.

Little Bighorn Battlefield NM https://www.nps.gov/libi/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Bighorn_Battlefield_National_Monument Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument preserves the site of the June 25 and 26, 1876, Battle of the Little Bighorn, near Crow Agency, Montana, in the United States. It also serves as a memorial to those who fought in the battle: George Armstrong Custer's 7th Cavalry and a combined Lakota-Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho force. Custer National Cemetery, on the battlefield, is part of the national monument. The site of a related military action led by Marcus Reno and Frederick Benteen is also part of the national monument, but is about 3 miles (5 km) southeast of the Little Bighorn battlefield. This area memorializes the US Army's 7th Cavalry and the Lakotas and Cheyennes in one of the Indian's last armed efforts to preserve their way of life. Here on June 25 and 26 of 1876, 263 soldiers, including Lt. Col. George A. Custer and attached personnel of the US Army, died fighting several thousand Lakota and Cheyenne warriors. Take Interstate I-90 and get off at Crow Agency Exit 510 at Jct 212. To reach Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, take Battlefield Tour Road 756 Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Visitor Center A museum and bookstore are located in the visitor center. Visitors can also watch an orientation video. Take Interstate I-90 and get off at Crow Agency Exit 510 at Jct 212. To reach Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument Visitor Center, take Battlefield Tour Road 756. Indian Memorial The sun sets behind the Indian Memorial. The Indian Memorial is a circular earthwork carved gently into the prairie. The walls carry the names of those who fell here as well as the words of some who fought in the battle. Rising Full Moon A rising moon peaks above the eastern horizon in January.. Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument moon rising above the Indian Memorial Seventh Calvary Memorial The Seventh Calvary Memorial at dusk. About 40 to 50 men of the original 210 were cornered on the hill where the monument now stands. Headstones in the winter Headstone can still been seen even with the fresh snow that blankets the battlefield . The monument and battlefield are open year round, even in winter when snow coats the ground. Stone House The stone house sits on the edge of the Custer National Cemetery. The stone house once served as a house for the Superintendent and their family. It has been renovated and restored and now serves as an office and research area. Grassland Fire Ecology Resource Brief Though Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument is a site devoted to history, preserving its grassland ecology remains integral to the park's mission. A history of lightning ignited wildfires and Native American land-use burning practices preserved the native vegetation. Now the park balances protection of cultural artifacts with a natural fire regime. Yucca surrounded by golden grassland hills NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments National Parks and National Cemeteries Currently, the National Park Service manages 14 national cemeteries. These cemeteries represent a continuum of use dating to a period before the establishment of the historical parks of which they are an integral part and are administered to preserve the historic character, uniqueness, and solemn nature of both the cemeteries and the historical parks of which they are a part. Setting sun lights up graves and decorations Northern Great Plains Annual Brome Adaptive Management Project Management and restoration of high quality, mixed-grass prairie to the NPS units has proved difficult and complex. The Annual Brome Adaptive Management project (ABAM) is attacking this problem through a cooperative effort. A firefighter uses a driptorch to ignite dried grasses while dark smoke billows behind. Checking Little Bighorn Battlefield's Vital Signs In 2007, the Rocky Mountain Inventory and Monitoring Network—a small team of NPS scientists—began monitoring natural resources, called “vital signs,” in Little Bighorn Battlefield and nearby park units. Vital signs indicate park health and serve as red flags if conditions deteriorate, supporting park managers’ efforts to make science-based management decisions. Learn about the NPS Inventory and Monitoring Division and its work in Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. A wide, flat river is flanked by riparian woods, with a dried, grassy hillside in the foreground. Protecting Native Mixed-Grass Prairie at Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument A sea of grass ripples across the landscape of Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument. These grasses are the mixed grass prairie—one of the most endangered habitats on the continent. Changes in land use have fragmented this prairie, and invasive plants and a changing climate pose further challenges. Learn how monument staff and partners are working to protect this special habitat and how you can help too. Golden, tall grasses blanket hills that are dotted by an occasional green shrub. Series: Prairie Ecology of the Badlands Badlands National Park is home to the nation's largest expanse of mixed-grass prairie. Here, plant species from both short-grass and tall-grass prairies mingle to create a unique home, well suited to many animals which call the park home. roots of tall yellow grasses penetrate into light brown soil beneath a cloudy blue sky. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Montana Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] thumbnail of cemetery Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains

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