"Log Cabin" by NPS , public domain

Lincoln Boyhood

National Memorial - Indiana

Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial is located in present-day Lincoln City, Indiana. It preserves the farm site where Abraham Lincoln lived with his family from 1816 to 1830. During that time, he grew from a 7-year-old boy to a 21-year-old man. Included in the park is the Lincoln Living Historical Farm. The site is located about ten minutes off the Interstate 64/U.S. 231 junction and near the new U.S. 231 Route, named the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Parkway in his honor.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/libo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Boyhood_National_Memorial Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial is located in present-day Lincoln City, Indiana. It preserves the farm site where Abraham Lincoln lived with his family from 1816 to 1830. During that time, he grew from a 7-year-old boy to a 21-year-old man. Included in the park is the Lincoln Living Historical Farm. The site is located about ten minutes off the Interstate 64/U.S. 231 junction and near the new U.S. 231 Route, named the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Parkway in his honor. Abraham Lincoln grew from youth to manhood on this southern Indiana soil. Many character and moral traits of one of the world's most respected leaders was formed and nurtured here. Explore Lincoln's boyhood and learn about the boy who would one day become the leader of our nation. From the east or west - From Interstate 64, exit onto US 231, (exit 57A). Travel south on US 231 to Indiana Highway 162. Take the Santa Claus/Gentryville exit. Turn west (right) on Indiana Highway 162; go 1-1/2 miles to the park entrance on the right. From the north or south - From US 231 take the Santa Claus/Gentryville exit. Turn west on Indiana Highway 162; go 1-1/2 miles to the park entrance on the right. Memorial Visitor Center The Memorial Visitor Center, completed in 1943, was designed with two memorial halls and a connecting cloister. The Memorial Court features five sculptured panels, the work or E.H. Daniels, marking significant periods in the life of Abraham Lincoln. Museum artifacts and exhibits portray the life of Abraham Lincoln. Learn about his family, boyhood, and frontier life in Indiana. From Interstate 64, exit on US 231, (exit 57A). Travel south on US 231 to Indiana Highway 162 (about 6 miles). Take the Santa Claus/Gentryville exit. Turn west (right) on Indiana Highway 162; go 1-1/2 miles to the park entrance on the right. Lincoln Living Historical Farm Cabin and smokehouse in the fall Replica cabin at re-created 1820s homestead which is on four of the original 160 acres owned by Thomas LIncoln. Cabin at Living Historical Farm Park ranger is period dress standing near fireplace, cooking in the cabin. Park rangers depict pioneer life in the 1820s. Memorial Visitor Center Memorial Building Memorial Building contains memorial halls to remember Abraham Lincoln and his family. Gravesite of Nancy Hanks Lincoln White marble headstone of Nancy Hanks Lincoln in cemetery surrounded by iron fence and trees. The headstone, erected in 1879, marks the burial spot of Abraham Lincoln's mother, who died of milk sickness in 1818. Cabin Site Memorial Bronze casting on the ground covering bottom logs of a cabin and fireplace. The site of what is believed Memorial at the site of the third Lincoln cabin. Commemorative Cultural Landscapes of the Midwest Behind the scenes at every NPS memorial site, a team of preservation professionals works to plan, design, and specify the type of treatment that is needed to preserve the physical place and the associated memories. Here are just a few examples of commemorative landscapes in the Midwest Region along with their treatment documents. Trees line both sides of a rectangular plaza of short grass, leading towards a tall flagpole. Emancipation and the Quest for Freedom Although the abolition of slavery emerged as a dominant objective of the Union war effort, most Northerners embraced abolition as a practical measure rather than a moral cause. The war resolved legally and constitutionally the single most important moral question that afflicted the nascent republic, an issue that prevented the country from coalescing around a shared vision of freedom, equality, morality, and nationhood. Slave family seated in front of their house Abraham Lincoln's Boyhood in Indiana 1816 to 1830 Abraham Lincoln lived in Indiana for 14 years, from age 7-21. He grew up on this southern Indiana soil. Wildland Fire in Oak Woodlands and Savannas of the Midwestern United States Oak woodlands depend on disturbances like fire to survive. Frequent fire created and maintained the open structure and make-up of the woodlands. Today, there are fewer oak woodlands across the central United States. Oak woodlands are converting into forests due to a lack of fire. Oak trees with an understory of grasses and forbs. The Border States The existence of divided populations in Border States had a profound impact on Union and Confederate strategy-both political and military. Each side undertook military and political measures--including brutal guerilla warfare-- in their attempts to control areas of divided loyalty and hostile moral and political views held by local civilians. Painting showing removal of Missouri civilians from their homes by Union troops NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial, Indiana Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] log cabins Abraham Lincoln "Learning by Littles" Opportunities to attend school were scarce on the frontier when Abraham Lincoln was young boy. He later said his education was acquired "by littles" and "did not amount to one year." Books like the ones Abraham Lincoln read growing up Great Lakes Fire Management Zone Fire Departments receive much needed wildland fire supplies and equipment. Three Fire Departments protecting NPS units in the Great Lakes Fire Management Zone received over $95,000 in wildland fire equipment this year through the Rural Fire Readiness Grant. NPS and Burns Harbor Firefighters stand in front of donated fire engine Junior Ranger Bingo Use your senses and explore the natural environment around you. Print off the Virtual Bingo card and draw or list the things you find. Five columns with five squares bingo card. Text reads virtual bingo. Amazing Flatboat Journey Learn about the "amazing" flatboat journey Abraham Lincoln took when he was 19 years old. Abraham Lincoln and Allen Gentry had many obstacles to face before starting their trip as well as during their trip to New Orleans, LA. Learn about their trip and find your way through the maze. Maze about Abraham Lincoln's journey from Rockport indiana to New Orleans. Trail of Twelve Stones The Trail of Twelve Stones is a unique way to review some of the major events in Abraham Lincoln's life. Beginning just east of the Cabin Site Memorial, twelve historic stones area arranged in chronological order at irregular intervals. This trail guide, and the small bronze tablets located near each stone, briefly explain the events in Lincoln's life associated with each of the memorial stones. Several shaded, stone-bench rest areas are provided for your convenience. Trail to large stone set in middle of trail surrounded by forest with bright green leaves On The Move The Lincoln family left Kentucky for Indiana in the winter of 1816. They would need to make sure they brought with them from their old home the things they need to survive. Figure out what items you think they would have needed to take with them and what they would leave behind! a wagon sits beside a tree lined trail that leads to a log cabin. What's the Problem? Do you enjoy math? Abraham Lincoln's total amount of education was about one year! He would often do math problems on his own at home. He even made his own workbook! Find the answer to these math problems to learn more about Abraham Lincoln and farm chores in the 1820s. worksheet of math problems, edges torn, written in script handwriting Bird Community Monitoring at Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial Birds are an important part of the world we live in. Around 43% of bird species that breed at Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial are in decline in the region. The Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network measures changes in birds and their habitats to determine the health of bird communities and park ecosystems. This information can help managers take effective steps to protect park habitat. A raptor in flight with wings spread Volunteer Bird Monitoring at Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial Heartland Network staff and volunteers monitor birds within the park during the Spring-breeding season. Volunteers are key to the success of this monitoring effort as they are able to survey birds in years when the Heartland Network is not scheduled to do so. This allows Heartland staff to establish continuous records on bird population trends for the park. Northern Cardinal Robert Todd Lincoln and Presidential Assassiations Robert Todd Lincoln, son of President and First Lady Lincoln, had the misfortune to be at the site of three Presidents of the United States. Read about occassion and how Robert Todd Lincoln was connected. a young man in his early twenties posing for a picture wearing a suit jacket National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial Cultural Landscape The Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial is a historic designed landscape with features that commemorate significant periods of Abraham Lincoln's life, including his boyhood, his political success, and his presidency. The design was the result of collaboration between the Olmsted Brothers, Donald Johnston, and Richard Bishop, and others, with additions by the CCC. Construction began in 1929 and was completed in 1934, with later phases of construction to add visitor facilities. A tall flagpole stands at the end of a stretch of turf, framed by a leafy allee. Volunteer Story: Rebecca Snider Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial’s youth volunteer, Rebecca Snider, recently put in her 2000th hour of lifetime volunteer service. Rebecca has volunteered most Saturdays throughout the year. Last year she volunteered 482 hours. She has a great love of animals and especially enjoys helping take care of the livestock at the Lincoln Living Historical Farm. Side profile of a girl in a baseball cap looking through the viewfinder of a DSLR camera. Forest Plant Community Monitoring at Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial Two hundred acres of old fields and hardwood forest make up Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial. The Heartland Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors forests on the Memorial to assess the current condition of the forests and to understand how they are changing over time. These forests provide visitors with a visual representation of the challenges the Lincoln family faced when they settled here. Fall foliage on forest trees behind a stone wall Problematic Plant Monitoring at Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial We have identified 45 problematic plant species at Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial since 2006. Problematic plants include nonnative plants, invasive plants, and what we sometimes refer to as weeds. These plants can cause harm to ecosystems and even to people. Plant surveys help determine which management actions are appropriate and provide information for tracking the success of problematic plant control efforts. Purple and white flowers and small compound leaves on a crown vetch plant Top 10 Tips for Visiting Lincoln Boyhood Planning a visit Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial? Check out our top 10 recommendations for things to do and trip ideas! Family walking park trail lined by split-rail fence and trees. "With Malice Toward None...": Lincoln's Second Inaugural Address In his Second Inaugural Address, March 4, 1865, a re-elected President Abraham Lincoln wanted to unify a broken nation. With the end of the Civil War within sight, many people on both sides felt anger and frustration toward their fellow Americans. Lincoln attempted to rise above the divisiveness and start the process of healing. Heralded as one of the most significant presidential speeches in American history, its meaning and eloquence still resonate with people today. Lincoln Second Inaugural on the steps of the US Capitol Lincoln in the Illinois State Legislature Abraham Lincoln spent more years as an Illinois state representative than his entire time as U.S. congressman and U.S. president combined. His service in the state legislature was marked by both triumph and failure, and instilled in Lincoln the need to govern while balancing political idealism with political reality. Portrait Photo of Abraham Lincoln ca. 1853

also available

National Parks
USFS NW