"Little River Falls February 2014" by NPS , public domain

Little River Canyon

National Preserve - Alabama

Little River Canyon National Preserve is located on top of Lookout Mountain near Fort Payne, Alabama, and DeSoto State Park. The monument preserve protects what is sometimes said to be the nation's longest mountaintop river, the Little River. The canyon was historically called "May's Gulf", "gulf" being a common term throughout the Cumberland Plateau for this sort of feature.

maps

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail of Tears - Trail Map

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/liri/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_River_Canyon_National_Preserve Little River Canyon National Preserve is located on top of Lookout Mountain near Fort Payne, Alabama, and DeSoto State Park. The monument preserve protects what is sometimes said to be the nation's longest mountaintop river, the Little River. The canyon was historically called "May's Gulf", "gulf" being a common term throughout the Cumberland Plateau for this sort of feature. Little River is unique because it flows for most of its length atop Lookout Mountain in northeast Alabama. Forested uplands, waterfalls, canyon rims and bluffs, pools, boulders, and sandstone cliffs offer settings for a variety of recreational activities. Natural resources and cultural heritage come together to tell the story of the Preserve, a special place in the Southern Appalachians. Little River Canyon National Preserve follows along the Little River and covers approximately 40 miles from the northeast corner to the southwest corner. The easiest way to access the park is by Alabama Highway 35 about 10 miles east out of Fort Payne, Alabama. Interstate 59 is the closest interstate. GPS Address: 432 Little River Trail, Fort Payne, AL 35967. Our address was updated by 911 and some GPS units will send you to an incorrect address. Please use this address for GPS units. Canyon Mouth Park Canyon Mouth Park has a fee booth/visitor contact station at the entrance. The booth is staffed from late spring through early fall. Information & handouts are available when the booth is staffed. An informational kiosk can be found near the restrooms - park maps can be found here too. Canyon Mouth Park is the only fee area at Little River Canyon National Preserve - $15 weekly passes & $35 annual passes can be purchased from the fee machine. America the Beautiful passes are accepted. Located near Cedar Bluff in Cherokee County on Cherokee County Road 275. From Little River Falls: East on AL Highway 35 for 2.5 miles, right on Cherokee County Road 273 for 7.5 miles, right on Cherokee County Road 275, follow to Canyon Mouth Park. OR South on AL Highway 176 for 12 miles, right on DeKalb County Road 148/Cherokee Country Road 275 for 14 miles (winding road with no shoulder, RVs & trailers not advised). For a more scenic drive, follow the Little River Canyon Rim Parkway (AL Jacksonville State University Little River Canyon Center The Jacksonville State University Little River Canyon Center is located adjacent to Little River Canyon National Preserve. National Park Service staff and Volunteers and Jacksonville State University staff will greet you and help you plan your visit. Amenities include: Information desk, restrooms, movie, gift shop, trails, and picnic tables. Hours are 8 AM - 4 PM Central Standard Time. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years Day. The Jacksonville State University Little River Canyon Center is located on the north side of Alabama Highway 35, approximately 10 miles east of the city of Fort Payne, Alabama. Interstate 59, which passes through the Fort Payne, Alabama area, is the closest interstate (connecting Birmingham, Alabama and Chattanooga, Tennessee). GPS units and apps may not recognize the 4322 Little River Trail NE Ste 100 address - please try the 432 Little River Trail address in your GPS. Camping Alternatives Camping in the Preserve is not allowed at this time. The Backcountry campsites (Hartline Ford, Billy's Ford, Slant Rock) have been closed. No date has been set for reopening at this time. DeSoto State Park and Little River RV Park & Campground are located within minutes of the Preserve and do offer camping. Little River Canyon in the Fall Fall Season in the Canyon Little River Canyon in the Fall Little River Falls in the Spring Little River Falls in the Spring, located on AL Hwy 35 Little River Falls in the Spring Little River Falls in the Fall Little River Falls in the Fall, located on AL Hwy 35 Little River Falls in the Fall Scenic Drive (AL Hwy 176) in the Fall Scenic Driver (AL Hwy 176) in the Fall Scenic Drive (AL Hwy 176) in the Fall DeSoto Scout Trail Bridge DeSoto Scout Trail Bridge located in the Backcountry Area Take a hike along the DeSoto Scout Trail NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Little River Canyon National Preserve, Alabama Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] waterfall on river Shaping the System under President George H.W. Bush President George H.W. Bush was an ardent supporter of the national parks. Explore some the parks that are part of the legacy of the presidency of George H.W. Bush, who served as the 41st president of the United States from January 20, 1989 to January 20, 1993. President George H.W. Bush shaking hands with a park ranger at the World War II Memorial Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains

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