"Reconstructed Birthplace of Lyndon Johnson" by NPS/Cynthia Dorminey , public domain

Lyndon B Johnson

National Historical Park - Texas

Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park is in central Texas about 50 miles (80 km) west of Austin in the Texas Hill Country. The park protects the birthplace, home, ranch, and final resting place of Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th President of the United States. During Johnson's administration, the LBJ Ranch was known as the "Texas White House" because the President spent approximately 20% of his time in office there.

maps

Official visitor map of the Ranch area of Lyndon B Johnson National Historical Park (NHP) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lyndon B. Johnson - Ranch

Official visitor map of the Ranch area of Lyndon B Johnson National Historical Park (NHP) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of the City area of Lyndon B Johnson National Historical Park (NHP) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lyndon B. Johnson - City

Official visitor map of the City area of Lyndon B Johnson National Historical Park (NHP) in Texas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/lyjo/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyndon_B._Johnson_National_Historical_Park Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park is in central Texas about 50 miles (80 km) west of Austin in the Texas Hill Country. The park protects the birthplace, home, ranch, and final resting place of Lyndon B. Johnson, 36th President of the United States. During Johnson's administration, the LBJ Ranch was known as the "Texas White House" because the President spent approximately 20% of his time in office there. ---Lyndon Baines Johnson Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park tells the story of our 36th President beginning with his ancestors until his final resting place on his beloved LBJ Ranch. This entire "circle of life" gives the visitor a unique perspective into one of America's most noteworthy citizens by providing the most complete picture of any American president. By car to National Park Headquarters and the Visitor Center in Johnson City: From Austin, take Highway 290 west. From San Antonio, take Highway 281 north. From Fredericksburg, take Highway 290 east. By car to the LBJ Ranch and LBJ State Park and Historic Site: From Johnson City, take Highway 290 fourteen miles west to the LBJ State Park. From Fredericksburg, take Highway 290 sixteen miles east to the LBJ State Park. The nearest major airports are in Austin and San Antonio. Hangar Visitor Center The Airplane Hangar Visitor Center serves as the information station for the LBJ Ranch District. Numerous exhibit areas include displays on life and work at the ranch, on Lady Bird Johnson, and on the Space Race. The 14-minute film “Our Heart’s Home” plays three times each hour. Visitors can eavesdrop on excerpts of telephone calls that President Johnson made from the ranch to people such as Billy Graham and Martin Luther King, Jr. Western National Parks Association (WNPA) operates a bookstore here. The Hangar Visitor Center is located on the LBJ Ranch. First, obtain a driving permit at the Lyndon B. Johnson State Park and Historic Site located on Highway 290 between Johnson City and Fredericksburg. Cross the Pedernales River to enter the LBJ Ranch. The ranch entrance gate is open 7 days/week, 9:00 am -4:30 pm. Following the LBJ Ranch Driving Tour route will lead you to the Hangar Visitor Center located in the Texas White House Complex. Plan on approximately 30 minutes drive time from the State Park. Lyndon B. Johnson State Park and Historic Site Visitor Center The state park encompasses more than 700 acres. Staff at the visitor center provide information and answer questions about the state park and the Sauer-Beckmann Living History Farm. Maps and free permits are issued here for driving tours of the nearby LBJ Ranch. A 26-minute, historic film on President Johnson at his Ranch shows on demand. A gift shop offers local souvenirs. Exhibits and displays on Texas pioneer life, the Hill Country and President Johnson are located in the nearby Exhibit Hall. From Johnson City, take Highway 290 fourteen miles westbound to the LBJ State Park and Historic Site. From Fredericksburg, take Highway 290 sixteen miles eastbound to the LBJ State Park and Historic Site. Park Headquarters and Visitor Center Park rangers and volunteers are available to answer questions and help plan your park visit. Maps of both the Johnson City district and LBJ Ranch district are available at the front desk. The visitor center also features exhibits on President Johnson's life and his legislative accomplishments as president. There are two 25-minute films in the visitor center that can be viewed upon request: "LBJ: The President" covers his presidential years and "Lady Bird" highlights her life and accomplishments. From Austin, take Highway 290 west to Johnson City. From San Antonio, take Highway 281 north to Johnson City. From Fredericksburg, take Highway 290 east to Johnson City. The visitor center is located two blocks south of Highway 290 at the intersection of Ladybird Lane and Avenue G. In addition to parking for cars, a lot is available for recreational vehicles and buses. President and Mrs. Johnson with Yuki in front of the Texas White House President and Mrs. Johnson stand with their small, white dog in front of the Texas White House. The Johnsons pose with their dog Yuki in front of the Texas White House. This was one of several photos from which they would choose for their 1972 Christmas card. Texas White House View of Texas White House from front lawn. Because President Johnson spent one-fourth of his term a president in Texas, the press referred to this home as the "Texas White House" Boyhood Home View of a one-story, white-frame house surrounded by a white picket fence. Lyndon Johnson was 5 years old when he moved to this home with his family. His childhood in a small rural town had great impact on his futur. Touring the LBJ Ranch A brown and white Hereford calf stands alongside the road as a car approaches from behind. A park visitor meets one of the ranch's Hereford cattle while driving the tour route. Cyclists in the LBJ 100 Luci Johnson (center in gray jersey) leads a bike tour Many special events, such as the LBJ 100 bike ride, take place during the year. Gravestones for Lyndon and Lady Bird Johnson Pink granite headstones mark the graves of President Lyndon Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson Pink granite headstones mark the graves of President Lyndon Johnson and First Lady Lady Bird Johnson Portrait of the Johnsons President and Mrs. Johnson stand outside the Texas White House with dog Yuki. For their 1972 Christmas card, the Johnsons stand outside the Texas White House with their dog Yuki. Pedernales River The Pedernales River with tree-lined banks under a blue sky dotted with clouds. The Pedernales River forms flows past the LBJ Ranch Lockheed Jetstar An exterior view of a White and blue jet with presidential seal painted just below the cockpit. One of the five Lockheed Jetstars in service during the Johnson Presidency is now on display at the LBJ Ranch.. Voting Rights Act of 1965 On August 5, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson passed the Voting Rights Act. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 expanded the 14th and 15th amendments by banning racial discrimination in voting practices. The act was a response to the barriers that prevented African Americans from voting for nearly a century. President Lyndon Johnson signs the Voting Rights Act of 1965 Of Soil and Water: Life on the LBJ Ranch Throughout his personal and political life, Lyndon B. Johnson remained connected to the Texas landscape on which he was born. The characteristics of the landscape and the region attracted and challenged settlers, including Johnson's grandparents. LBJ raised show-quality Hereford cattle and continued to be involved in operation of the ranch. A round pool of water is surrounded by rolling, grassy fields, blue sky, and scattered leafy trees. Streams Monitoring in the Sonoran Desert and Southern Plains Because of their importance, streams were chosen as a focus for monitoring in the National Park Service (NPS) Sonoran Desert and Southern Plains inventory and monitoring networks. Portions of several major river systems (or their tributaries) are found within many parks of both networks. Monitoring water quality from a boat Module Conducts Wildland-Urban Interface Projects Throughout the Intermountain Region In 2013, the Saguaro Wildland Fire Module (WFM) managed multiple projects simultaneously in AZ, TX, and NM. WFMs are highly skilled and versatile fire crews that provide expertise in long-term planning, ignitions, holding, prescribed fire preparation and implementation support, hazardous fuels reduction, and fire effects monitoring. With their help, fire fulfills its natural or historic role to meet resource and management objectives and create fire-adapted communities. Exotic Plants Monitoring in the Southern Plains and Chihuahuan Desert National parks, like other publicly managed lands, are deluged by new exotic species arriving through predictable (e.g., road, trail, and riparian corridors), sudden (e.g., long distance dispersal through cargo containers and air freight), and unexpected anthropogenic pathways (e.g., weed seeds mixed in with restoration planting mixes). Landscape with a uniform, green foreground consisting of invasive kochia Climate Change in the Southern Plains Network Climate change may have direct and/or indirect effects on many elements of Southern Plains network ecosystems, from streams and grasslands to fires and birds. Russian knapweed (Acroptilon repens) is an invasive plant that has invaded the Southern Plains Climate Monitoring in the Southern Plains, Sonoran Desert, and Chihuahuan Desert Climate is one of many ecological indicators monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Climate data help scientists to understand ecosystem processes and help to explain many of the patterns and trends observed in other natural-resource monitoring. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor climate using the scientific protocol described here. Kayaking across a fl ooded parking lot, Chickasaw NRA, July 2007. Southwestern Plains The Plains of the Southwest include the southern Great Plains, the High Plains, Llano Estacado (Staked Plains), and Edwards Plateau. Sunset lights up the grass at Capulin Volcano National Monument Lyndon B. Johnson NHP Word Search Activity Find all of the words in order to complete the Word Search Activity. President Johnson signing of the Health Research Facilities Amendments Lyndon B. Johnson NHP Trivia Activity How well do you know President Johnson? Test your knowledge by completing this trivia activity! President Lyndon B. Johnson posing with his dog Blanco. Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park, Texas Lyndon B. Johnson NHP is in the Pedernales River valley in the Hill Country of Texas, a relatively rugged landscape of hills with granitic or carbonate bedrock and characterized by shallow soils. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. The Johnson's home Staff Spotlight: Vanessa Torres Meet Vanessa Torres, Program Manager of Interpretation, Education, and Community Engagement for Lyndon B Johnson National Historical Park and Waco Mammoth National Monument. Hear her story and advice she has for youth and young adults. Vanessa Torres enjoying a break in the Texas Bluebonnets Staff Spotlight: Jorge Hernandez Meet Jorge Hernandez, Education and Community Engagement Coordinator with Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park. Learn how he first got involved with the National Park Service as a volunteer, his journey with NPS, and advice for youth and young adults. Profile photo of Jorge Hernandez

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