"Allagash Waterway" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Maine Acadian Culture

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Maine Acadian Culture is an affiliated area of the United States national park system, which ties together a variety of sites on the U.S. side of the Saint John River Valley on the Maine–New Brunswick border. The common history of Acadians on both sides of the river is best understood by visiting and learning about sites and events in both Maine and New Brunswick, as well as Nova Scotia. However, the U.S. federal mandate ends at the border, hence the name of this affiliated unit. Its management is overseen by Acadia National Park, the closest staffed U.S. national park system unit, to promote the Maine Acadian Heritage Council's work in highlighting the unique ethnicity and culture of the region.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Maine Acadian Culture https://www.nps.gov/maac/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maine_Acadian_Culture Maine Acadian Culture is an affiliated area of the United States national park system, which ties together a variety of sites on the U.S. side of the Saint John River Valley on the Maine–New Brunswick border. The common history of Acadians on both sides of the river is best understood by visiting and learning about sites and events in both Maine and New Brunswick, as well as Nova Scotia. However, the U.S. federal mandate ends at the border, hence the name of this affiliated unit. Its management is overseen by Acadia National Park, the closest staffed U.S. national park system unit, to promote the Maine Acadian Heritage Council's work in highlighting the unique ethnicity and culture of the region. Maine Acadians share beliefs and experiences tying them to a common religion, languages, and history. The St. John River, land, and family are essential to their culture. The National Park Service supports the Maine Acadian Heritage Council, an association of historical societies, cultural clubs, towns, and museums that work together to support Maine Acadian culture in the St. John Valley. The Saint John Valley is located in northern Aroostook County, Maine, 200 miles north of Bangor at the northern terminus of ME 1. It is best reached by private vehicle. From Interstate 95, use exits at Sherman or Smyrna Mills for Route 11 to Fort Kent, or the exit at Houlton for U.S. Route 1 North. Acadian Village Scenic view of Acadian Village Scenic view of Acadian Village Our Lady of Assumption Church, Acadian Village Our Lady of Assumption Church, Acadian Village Our Lady of Assumption Church, Acadian Village Mont-Carmel Mont-Carmel, newly painted in original color scheme. Mont-Carmel, newly painted in original color scheme. St Francis Historical Society and Gardens St Francis Historical Society and Gardens St Francis Historical Society and Gardens Bangor/Aroostook Caboose & Green Water Tank This site preserves one of a few surviving train water tanks in the United States and a 1940s era ca This site preserves one of a few surviving train water tanks in the United States and a 1940s era caboose

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