"Dripstone Wall" by NPS Photo , public domain

Mammoth Cave

National Park - Kentucky

Mammoth Cave National Park is in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It's home to the Mammoth Cave, a long cave system of chambers and subterranean passageways. Sites include the Frozen Niagara section, known for waterfall-like flowstone formations, and Gothic Avenue, its ceiling covered in 19th-century visitors’ signatures. Trails take in other park features like the Green and Nolin rivers and the sinkholes of Cedar Sink.

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Official visitor map of Mammoth Cave National Park (NP) in Kentucky. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Mammoth Cave - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Mammoth Cave National Park (NP) in Kentucky. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Mammoth Cave National Park (NP) in Kentucky. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Mammoth Cave - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Mammoth Cave National Park (NP) in Kentucky. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/maca https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammoth_Cave_National_Park Mammoth Cave National Park is in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It's home to the Mammoth Cave, a long cave system of chambers and subterranean passageways. Sites include the Frozen Niagara section, known for waterfall-like flowstone formations, and Gothic Avenue, its ceiling covered in 19th-century visitors’ signatures. Trails take in other park features like the Green and Nolin rivers and the sinkholes of Cedar Sink. Rolling hills, deep river valleys, and the worlds longest known cave system. Mammoth Cave National Park is home to thousands of years of human history and a rich diversity of plant and animal life, earning it the title of UNESCO World Heritage Site and International Biosphere Reserve. DO NOT FOLLOW YOUR GPS! From the North: Take Interstate 65 to Exit 53 (Cave City Exit). Turn right onto KY-70. Follow 70/255 as it becomes the Mammoth Cave Parkway in the park. Follow the Mammoth Cave Parkway to the Visitor Center. From the South: Take Interstate 65 to Exit 48 (Park City Exit). Turn left onto KY-255 and follow 255 as it becomes the Park City Road into the park. Follow Park City Road until it joins the Mammoth Cave Parkway; turn left. Follow the Mammoth Cave Parkway to the Visitor Center. Mammoth Cave Visitor Center The park visitor center is the central point for visitors to orient themselves to what lies both above and below the surface at Mammoth Cave. Situated just up the hill from the cave's Historic Entrance, the visitor center is the departure point for all cave tours, and offers exhibits to prepare you for discovery. You can also meet a ranger for a talk or a hike. Gifts, restrooms, permits and information are available, and visitor amenities are offered by the nearby Mammoth Cave Hotel across the footbridge. From the North: Take Interstate 65 to Exit 53 (Cave City Exit). Turn right onto KY-70. Follow 70/255 as it becomes the Mammoth Cave Parkway in the park. Follow the Mammoth Cave Parkway to the Visitor Center. From the South: Take Interstate 65 to Exit 48 (Park City Exit). Turn left onto KY-255 and follow 255 as it becomes the Park City Road into the park. Follow Park City Road until it joins the Mammoth Cave Parkway; turn left. Follow the Mammoth Cave Parkway to the Visitor Center. Houchin Ferry Campground The Houchin Ferry Campground lies next to the Green River at the former location of the Houchin Ferry. This campground is operated year-round and is located 15 miles from the Visitor Center and two miles east of Brownsville, KY. For campers who like it simple, these 12 tent-only campsites afford a quiet visit with drive-up access. Houchin Ferry Campground - Primitive Site - Regular 20.00 Each site has a fire ring and picnic table. Each site is accessible by vehicle. Maximum number of campers is 8, maximum stay is 14 days in a calendar year. Houchin Ferry Campground - Primitive Site - Access Card 10.00 Each site has a fire ring and picnic table. Each site is accessible by vehicle. Maximum number of campers is 8, maximum stay is 14 days in a calendar year. Houchin Ferry Campground - Campsite Campsites with picnic tables nearby the river. At Houchin Ferry Campground, every site has a river view. Houchin Ferry Campground - Simple Camping A Houchin Ferry campsite with tent, fire ring, picnic table and lantern hook overlooks Green River. Houchin Ferry Campground sites may be primitive sites - but they're welcoming. Houchin Ferry Campground - Primitive Campsites An unoccupied campsite with concrete picnic table, fire ring and lantern hook. This campground's primitive sites feature a picnic table, fire ring, and lantern hook. Houchin Ferry Campground - Picnic Shelter An open-air picnic shelter with multiple picnic tables and a brick fireplace. Houchin Ferry Campground also offers an open-air picnic shelter with a fireplace. Houchin Ferry Campground - Toilet Facilities A wooden enclosure containing portable toilet facilities. Chemical toilets are provided at Houchin Ferry Campground. Mammoth Cave Campground The Mammoth Cave Campground is ideal for visitors seeking an authentic national park experience while still having easy access to amenities, cave tours, and other park activities. This developed campground is located within ¼ mile from the visitor center and contains 111 campsites with a mixture of tent only sites, group sites, tent or RV sites, and accessible sites. Rangers on duty in the campground kiosk are happy to provide information to make your stay a special adventure. Mammoth Cave Campground - Single Site 25.00 Per-night, per-site fee for a single campsite in the Mammoth Cave Campground at the regular rate. Limit 8 persons per site. Campers may stay a maximum of 14 days in a calendar year. Check-in time is 12:00 noon, and check-out time is 11:00 am. No refunds. Mammoth Cave Campground - Single Site - Senior Pass or Access Pass 12.50 Per-night, per-site fee for a single campsite in the Mammoth Cave Campground at the reduced rate for visitors with Golden Age/Golden Access Passports and America The Beautiful Senior/Access Passports. Limit 8 persons per site. Campers may stay a maximum of 14 days in a calendar year. Check-in time is 12:00 noon, and check-out time is 11:00 am. No refunds. Mammoth Cave Campground - Group Site 40.00 Per-night, per-site fee for a single campsite in the Mammoth Cave Campground at the regular rate. No discount is offered on group camping. Limit 16 persons per site. Campers may stay a maximum of 14 days in a calendar year. Check-in time is 12:00 noon, and check-out time is 11:00 am. No refunds. Mammoth Cave Campground - VIP Site 50.00 RV sites with full water, sewer and electric hookups. Limit eight persons per night per site. Mammoth Cave Campground - VIP Site - Senior Pass or Access Pass 25.00 RV sites with full water, sewer and electric hookups. Limit eight persons per night per site. Mammoth Cave Campground - Campsite A white and blue tent and fire ring in a woodland setting Mammoth Cave Campground has dozens of sites nestled in a woodland setting. Mammoth Cave Campground - Campsite Amenities Typical amenities of a campsite at Mammoth Cave Campground: a picnic table, a fire ring, and parking A typical campsite with picnic table, fire ring, and parking. Mammoth Cave Campground - RV Site A campsite for RVs, showing paved turn-in, picnic table, and fire ring. RV sites have full paved turn-ins. Mammoth Cave Campground - Path A pathway bordered by wooden rails imparts a rustic setting. Easy paths wind between campground loops in a rustic setting. Mammoth Cave Campground - Restrooms A roofed wooden restroom facility shown from outside. All restrooms in Mammoth Cave Campground are fully accessible. Maple Springs Group Campground Maple Springs Group Campground lies on the park's north side, six miles from the visitor center and three miles north of Green River Ferry. This campground offers more secluded sites ideal for larger groups of campers and their horse companions. All sites have electric and water hookups for RVs. This campground is a natural launching-point for forays along the more than 70 miles of backcountry trails in Mammoth Cave National Park. Maple Springs Group Campground - Regular Group Site - Water/Electric Hookups 50.00 Regular Group Site - No Horses - One fire ring, one picnic table, maximum number per group: 16, maximum stay 14 days in a calendar year. Maple Springs Group Campground - Equestrian Site - Water/Electric Hookups 50.00 Equestrian site with water and electric hookups - Horses permitted - One fire ring, one picnic table, maximum number per group: 16, maximum stay 14 days in a calendar year. Do not picket horses to live trees. Horse trailers must remain on pavement. Maple Springs Group Campground - Campsite A typical Maple Springs campsite with picnic tables, fire rings, water pump and tie-off for horses. A typical Maple Springs campsite with picnic tables, fire rings, water pump and tie-off for horses. Maple Springs Group Campground - Restrooms Exterior view of the roofed wooden restroom facility, with pit toilets. The restroom facilities at Maple Spring Group Camp feature pit toilets. Maple Springs Group Campground - Campfire Circle A large stone campfire circle is surrounded by a semicircle of benches in the woods. A campfire circle offers a place for woodland stories at Maple Springs. Waterfall at Historic Entrance A cascade of water pours over a rock ledge. Green foliage is in the background. The sound of falling water welcomes visitors into the natural entrance of Mammoth Cave. Historic Entrance A long staircase travels down a slope into the dark cave opening. The Historic Entrance to Mammoth Cave has welcomed explorers for centuries. Cleaveland Avenue A long cave passage with an oval shape. The network of cave passages in the Mammoth Cave system stretches over 400 miles. Good Spring Baptist Church A small white church building with yellow flowers in the foreground. Three historic church structures still stand, shedding light on the pre-park communities that once existed here. Heritage Trail A wooden boardwalk leads into the forest. The half-mile Heritage Trail leads to panoramic views of the Green River. Green River Valley A view of a river valley with hills covered in trees. A blue sky with white clouds stands above. Rolling hills and valleys can be seen from many of the overlooks in the park. Gothic Avenue A large stacked stone pillar reaches the flat ceiling containing signatures in a cave passage. Over two hundred years of guided tours leads to the history of Mammoth Cave. 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2010 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Geologic Maps in Action—Promote Education <strong>Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky</strong></br> Example of the application of geologic map data to support educational programs. cave formations Park Air Profiles - Mammoth Cave National Park Air quality profile for Mammoth Cave National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for Mammoth Cave NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for Mammoth Cave NP. Inside Mammoth Cave Morale, Welfare and Recreation in WWII National Parks Wartime NPS Director Newton Drury wrote 'In wartime, the best function of these areas is to prove a place to which members of the armed forces and civilians may retire to restore shattered nerves and to recuperate physically and mentally for the war tasks still ahead of them.' During World War II, parks across the United States supported the morale of troops and sought to become places of healing for those returning from war. B&W; soldiers post in front of large tree Southeast National Parks Train 165 New Wildland Firefighters Between December 2011 and March 2012, Southeast Region national parks trained 165 new wildland firefighters in S-130/190 courses at four separate units, including Mammoth Cave National Park, Kings Mountain National Military Park, Cumberland Island National Seashore, and Everglades National Park. Trainees came from federal and state agencies, local fire departments, universities, and other partners. Cultural Landscapes by Bicycle There are many ways to experience national parks by bicycle, with route options for all levels of experience and preference. Here are just three examples of ways to explore park cultural landscapes by bike in the southeastern part of the United States. Ride a loop road through an agricultural community in a fertile valley, follow the path of a former railroad that once brought tourists to Mammoth Cave, or travel mountain bike trails to a farmstead from the late 1800s. Two people with bikes gaze over a valley filled with fog, with blue mountains in the background. The 21st Century Fire Education Program In 2009, Mammoth Cave National Park signed an agreement with Barren County Middle School, partnering with the school to offer three week-long summer camps in conjunction with the school's 21st Century Learning Center. The park's environmental education program developed camps that focus on water/hydrology, nature/cave exploration, and fire. The fire camp, which was dubbed “Hot Shots,” contributes to children’s learning and connection with nature. 2011 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Discover the innovative and exciting programs of the recipients of the national and regional 2011 Freeman Tilden Awards for excellence in interpretation. LIza Stearns 2003 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2003 Environmental Achievement Awards 2005 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2005 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Bat Projects in Parks: Mammoth Cave National Park Conserving bats takes a variety of projects. Mammoth Cave National Park tried just that! A wooden railed walkway down into Mammoth Cave National Park Industry and Economy during the Civil War Both North and South mobilized industry to an unprecedented degree. But the North, which already had a head start in nearly every realm of industrial and agricultural development, far outpaced the South during the war. Unhampered by the southern opposition in such areas as providing free land to farmers and subsidizing a transcontinental railroad before the war, Congress passed sweeping legislation to expand the economy. As the war dragged on, in part because many of the ba Lithograph showing industrial and technological advancements of the Civil War Bats in Caves Bats and caves go together in people's minds. National Parks are home to many important bat caves. But, bats are particular. Many caves only contain a few bats. Some bats like certain caves for raising their young and other caves for winter hibernation. Other bats avoid caves entirely and sleep and raise their young in protected locations in trees and rocks outside. a group of bats hanging on a cave ceiling 2019 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. Tuberculosis in Mammoth Cave Dr. John Croghan of Louisville, Kentucky recognized certain qualities of the air at Mammoth Cave. He believed the uniform temperature and humidity would be therapeutic for patients with tuberculosis, and in 1842 he invited 16 patients to take up residence in the cave. He developed an experimental hospital treatment facility within the cave, around the same time that tourism was expanding. A group of people on and around a square, stone structure placed against the wall of a cave. Creating Beautiful Spaces Through Landscape Architecture Learn more about Landscape Architect Kate Randall and the type of work she does for NPS. Kate standing in outdoor area of a building in Christiansted, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. Shark Fossil—"Saivodus striatus" Interactive 3D Model Collected from Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky. 3d model of fossil on larger rock Shark Fossil—"Glikmanius" Interactive 3D Model Collected from Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky. painting of a prehistoric shark The Ghosts of Ancient Sharks at Mammoth Cave National Park 2019–2020 investigations at Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky, have revealed an unprecedented assemblage of Paleozoic (Late Mississippian) shark fossils preserved in the passages of the cave system. Not only teeth and spines are present, but there are examples of rare cartilaginous skeletal remains, and the fossils include previously unknown species. a paleo artist's painting of an ancient shark dead on the seafloor The International Year of Caves and Karst in 2021 and 2022 The International Year of Caves and Karst is coming in 2021 and our National Parks will be participating with events and activities for all to enjoy. karst towers in china Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 12, No. 2, Fall 2020 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> fossils on the ground with two people and a mountain in the distance Series: Mammoth Cave Collections—Paleontology More than 40 different species of fossil sharks and relatives have been identified from Mammoth Cave specimens. painting of a prehistoric shark Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Park Uses of Geologic Information Geologic maps are critical to understanding a national park. Park staff use geologic maps for many purposes. These are just a few examples. colorful section of a geologic map of bryce canyon Series: Cave Week—Featured Articles More than 20 parks across the US are participating in Cave Week via social media posts, cave tours, exhibits, school events, web pages and much more. The theme for Cave Week 2020 is, “Why do we go into caves?” This articles shares a few stories about why people (and bats) enter caves. person standing by underground lake in a cave Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ From Dirt to Gunpowder Before Mammoth Cave was a popular travel destination, or even a national park, the owners of the cave operated a lucrative mining operation within the underground passageways. However, it was not precious metals or gems that were being mined from Mammoth Cave, but rather a mineral that exists in the dirt of the cave that aided the United States during the War of 1812. A diorama of what the saltpetre operation may have looked like. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. large cavern Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Prehistoric Cave Discoveries Throughout the modern history of Mammoth Cave, discoveries of some of the earliest prehistoric indigenous people have been found throughout the cave. a plant fiber woven slipper The Kentucky Cave Wars In the early twentieth century, an era of competition gripped the Mammoth Cave region. Rival cave owners battled in the courtroom, as well as along the roads, for the tourist dollars passing through Kentucky’s cave country en route to the future national park. A black and white photo of a road side booth with two people. Tragedy at Sand Cave A story that captivated the world and changed the trajectory for Mammoth Cave National Park. A black and white portrait of a man with a jacket and tie. Exploring the Worlds Longest Known Cave In 1972 a group of six cave explorers discovered the missing connection to make Mammoth Cave the worlds longest cave system. A black and white photo of a group of six people in caving gear. Blanket Cave National Youth Park—Activity Enjoy a fun activity and learn about caves even when you can't get out to a park. In this activity you will build your own cave and learn how to make it like a "real" natural cave. Find out about cave formations and wildlife, and how to be safe and care for caves. New "Blanket Cave National Youth Parks" are springing up all across America! Join the fun! cartoon drawing of a childs and a park ranger exploring a cave Top Ten Tips for Visiting Mammoth Cave National Park Discover the top ten insider tips for making your trip to Mammoth Cave National Park a great one! A long staircase leading down into a cave opening. The Great War Monuments Two of the nation's oldest World War I monuments stand as silent sentinels in the entryway of Mammoth Cave subtly sharing the message of remembrance. Two stone monuments dedicated to fallen soldiers of WWI. There are engravings on the front. 2021 IYCK Mammoth Cave Regional Art Contest Winners Winner of the Mammoth Cave National Park's 2021 International Years of Cave and Karst art contest. Freshwater Mussel Relocation Project: Endangered Species of Mammoth Cave At Mammoth Cave National Park, ongoing conservation efforts are happening to save indicator species from one of the most biodiverse rivers in the country and to bring back several species from the brink of extinction. A person holding a freshwater mussel. Kentucky Cave Shrimp: Endangered Species of Mammoth Cave Once presumed extinct, these tiny eyeless shrimp are found no where on Earth except the dark subterranean rivers in Mammoth Cave National Park. A translucent cave shrimp Bats: Endangered Species of Mammoth Cave Threatened and endangered bat species that call Mammoth Cave National Park home and the conservation efforts to protect them. A researcher holding a bat Mammoth Cave Hotel Roof Replacement Project The Mammoth Cave Hotel Roof Replacement Project is funded through the Great American Outdoors Act and will help address the park’s backlogged maintenance needs and correct other exterior and interior deficiencies of the park’s main hotel building. An artist rendering of the new lobby of a hotel building. Cookie Recipes Inspired by Mammoth Cave Try out two Mammoth Cave inspired cookie recipes - snowball cookies, and gluten free “Oh, Ranger!” chocolate peppermint cookies! Several chocolate cookies atop a book entitles "The Miles of Mammoth Cave". Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Ranger Roll Call, 1917-1929 Recent research demonstrates that there were more women rangers and ranger-naturalists in early National Park Service (NPS) history than previously thought. However, the number of women in uniformed positions was quite low in any given year. Ranger Frieda Nelson shows of the suspenders used to hold up her uniform breeches. Women in Fire Science: Alicia Schlarb Alicia Schlarb is the lead fire effects monitor for a portion of the National Park Service's Southeast Region. She and her crew provide prescribed burning, monitoring, and wildland fire responses to national parks located within Mississippi, Louisiana, Alabama, and portions of Tennessee, Kentucky, and Florida. She loves fire and that she can change perceptions about wildland fire through science. Alicia Schlarb.

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