"Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project" by Jeff Keyzer , public domain

Manhattan Project

National Historical Park - New Mexico

Manhattan Project National Historical Park commemorates the Manhattan Project. The park consists of three units: one in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, one in Los Alamos, New Mexico and one in Hanford, Washington.

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Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Santa Fe - National Historic Trail

Official Visitor Map of Santa Fe National Historic Trail (NHT) in Colorado, Kansas, Misouri, New Mexico and Oklahoma. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Bandelier National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Bandelier - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Bandelier National Monument (NM) in New Mexico. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Southwestern area of Santa Fe National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Santa Fe MVUM - Southwest 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Southwestern area of Santa Fe National Forest (NF) in New Mexico. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

https://www.nps.gov/mapr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_Project_National_Historical_Park Manhattan Project National Historical Park commemorates the Manhattan Project. The park consists of three units: one in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, one in Los Alamos, New Mexico and one in Hanford, Washington. The Manhattan Project is one of the most transformative events of the 20th century. It ushered in the nuclear age with the development of the world’s first atomic bombs. The building of atomic weapons began in 1942 in three secret communities across the nation. As World War II waned in 1945, the United States dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan — forever changing the world. Manhattan Project National Historical Park is located in three states: New Mexico, Tennessee, and Washington. For more information on accessing each of these three units, visit our Directions & Transportation page. Hanford Visitor Center CLOSED: Located in the city of Richland, this is the main visitor contact point for the Manhattan Project National Historical Park in the Tri-Cities. You can view our site film, “Hanford Made,” stamp your National Park Service passport, examine exhibits and displays, pick up a junior ranger booklet, and talk with park staff. Take State Highway 240 North. Turn left on Logston Blvd. Building is on the right, with a red roof. Los Alamos Visitor Center At the Los Alamos Visitor Center you can speak with park rangers, tour exhibits about the Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, and learn more about where to go in town. Take Central Avenue or 502/Trinity Drive to 20th Street. Oak Ridge Visitor Center The Oak Ridge Visitor Center is located within the Children's Museum of Oak Ridge. Here you are able to speak with National Park Service rangers, watch a short film on the Manhattan Project, and get literature on Manhattan Project-related historic sites throughout Oak Ridge. Children's Museum of Oak Ridge 461 W. Outer Dr. Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (865) 482-1942 Tri-Cities Visitor Center OPEN: Visit Tri-Cities is the tourism information center for the local area. This is a great place to stop by for helpful trip-planning advice for visiting the park and numerous other attractions in the Tri-Cities. The helpful staff can provide you with itineraries for visits to the Tri-Cities region and suggest entertainment, lodging, and dining options. You may also purchase souvenir items and stamp your national parks passport here. Visit Tri-Cities may be reached at 509-735-8486. Top Secret! a green background with "Top Secret" and atomic diagrams The Manhattan Project was a top-secret project focused on building the world's first atomic weapons. B Reactor Under Construction Black and white photograph of a construction site with scaffolding and workers visible. Constructing the B Reactor, the world's first full scale nuclear reactor, took hard work and ingenuity. Calutron Girls black and white photo of group of women sitting at their individual stations in the Y-12 plant The Calutron Girls operated the arrays, or “racetracks”, at Oak Ridge’s Y-12 Electromagnetic Isotope Separation Plant during the Manhattan Project. Bruggemann Ranch Color photograph of a large field of wild grass with a stone building in the background. The Bruggemann Ranch was a major farm that was forcibly evacuated to create the Hanford Site. International Friendship Bell Ranger facing a large bronze cast bell hanging from an abstract pavilion surrounded by green space The International Friendship Bell in Oak Ridge, Tennessee symbolizes peace and reconciliation between the United States and Japan. Ashley Pond a landscaped pond with fountain in front of snowy mountains and a blue sky with clouds Ashley Pond has been a central part of the Los Alamos community since the days before the Manhattan Project. The Gadget A man stands next to a complicated, spherical device covered in wires Norris Bradbury stands next to the Gadget, the device used in the Trinity Test. Oppenheimer and Groves at Trinity Test Site Two men stand next to a mangled piece of metal equipment in the desert. J. Robert Oppenheimer and Gen. Leslie Groves at the Trinity Test Site. Manhattan Project Science at Los Alamos The secret Manhattan Project site at Los Alamos, New Mexico was instrumental in developing atomic bombs. It was here that research and assembly of these new weapons took place, including the Gadget, the world's first successful atomic bomb test. Six scientists gathered around a large, hanging metal sphere Symbols of Peace in the Secret Cities of the Manhattan Project The three primary Manhattan Project locations all feature unique examples of memorializing the project and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Large bronze bell hanging with text of Hiroshima/Nagasaki on bell White Sands New Mexico: The National Park Service, the US Army and the Atomic Bomb The future of White Sands, and for that matter the nation as a whole, reached a watershed in the spring of 1945. The sequence of events in the Tularosa basin from April to August 1945 created the "atomic age" tensions that bedeviled the monument for the next five decades. Trinity atomic bomb last Victory Gardens at Oak Ridge With the pressing demands of feeding the nation’s fighting forces and the nationwide rationing of canned foods there was a desire and need for people to grow locally. Victory Gardens could be found all over the country during WWII, from the backyards in Oak Ridge to the rooftops in New York City. a man hand plows a home garden on a hillside Harry S Truman’s Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb President Harry S Truman was notified of the successful test of the atomic bomb, what he called “the most terrible bomb in the history of the world.” Thousands of hours of research and development as well as billions of dollars had contributed to its production. This was no theoretical research project. It was created to destroy and kill on a massive scale. As president, it was Harry Truman’s decision if the weapon would be used with the goal to end the war. image of atomic bomb devastation in Japan African-American Involvement in the Manhattan Project Despite the many challenges that African-Americans faced during this point in time in American history, many went on to become prominent citizens; doctors, teachers, principals, city counsel members, leaders within their communities, and some became scientists within the Manhattan Project. 3 african american women hang laundry in front of a house Manhattan Project Science at Hanford The Manhattan Project site at Hanford, Washington was instrumental in developing an atomic bomb. Hanford's plutonium- producing facilities led to the creation of Fat Man, the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan on August 9, 1945. Black and white aerial photo of large reactor complex showing buildings and stacks The Story of Sadako Sasaki The story of Sadako Sasaki, a young survivor of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. A young Japanese girl wearing all white standing in front of a hospital The Atomic Legacy The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan in August, 1945 forever altered global culture. From toys to films, books to classroom safety drills, the legacy of the Manhattan Project continues to influence us to this day. 1954 Godzilla film poster Manhattan Project Science at Oak Ridge The creation of Oak Ridge, Tennessee during the Manhattan Project centered around the need for enriched uranium to develop atomic weapons. Several facilities in Oak Ridge, Y-12, K-25, and S-50, achieved this goal by different, revolutionary means. Black and white aerial photo of S-50. A large complex along a river bend with several smoekstacks The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6 and August 9, 1945 forever changed the world. Nagasaki destruction, hillside in distance with almost no structures remaining Manhattan Project Site Selection The selection of sites for the Manhattan Project was not made at random. All three primary locations, Hanford, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge, had to conform to certain parameters in order for the project to be successful. Black and white photo of an earth mover, concrete tubing, and several workers in a muddy field. Top 10 Tips for Visiting Manhattan Project NHP This Summer Tips to make the most out of your visit to Manhattan Project NHP. Before the Bomb: Inclusive Archeology in the Cultural Landscape of the Manhattan Project National Historic Site The site at TA-18 does retain its historic integrity, and although it currently has a much different use at the moment, it ceased operations as a research facility in 2007, and is now opened primarily as a potential interpretive site as part of the Manhattan Project National Historical Site this aerial view, although it focuses on the more modern structures associated with the Manhattan Project, it represents about 1,500 years of continuous human occupation. Aerial view: Site TA-18 - a cluster of buildings, roads, landscape - Los Alamos National Laboratory Hispanic Homesteaders and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory was created to develop the atomic bomb. The government decided on Los Alamos County in New Mexico as a site for the Manhattan Project. Most of the land already belonged to the government as part of the Forest Service, but there was a community of Hispanic homesteaders and other property owners in the area. The homesteaders received less than their Anglo counterparts for their land. In 2005, they received reparations for the unfair treatment. two log buildings in the mountains Karen Dorn Steele Karen Dorn Steele is an environmental journalist known for breaking the story of nuclear experiments causing potential public health damage at the Hanford Nuclear Site. Woman in white lab coat and cap stands in the middle of five journalists inside the PUREX Plant. Leona Woods Marshall Libby Dr. Leona Woods Marshall Libby was the only female member of the team that built the world’s first nuclear reactor—the Chicago Pile—and the only woman present when the reactor went critical. Professional woman in coat and scarf speaks to man in suit, showing piece of paper

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