"Looking toward Sunshine Bottom from SD" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Missouri

National Recreational River - SD, NE

The Missouri National Recreational River is located on the border between Nebraska and South Dakota. The designation was first applied in 1978 to a 59-mile section of the Missouri River between Gavins Point Dam and Ponca State Park. In 1991, an additional 39-mile section between Fort Randall Dam and Niobrara, Nebraska, was added to the designation. These two stretches of the Missouri River are the only parts of the river between Montana and the mouth of the Missouri that remain undammed or unchannelized. The last 20 miles of the Niobrara River and 6 miles of Verdigre Creek were also added in 1991.

maps

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lewis & Clark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Missouri National Recreational River (NRR) in South Dakota and Nebraska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Missouri - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Missouri National Recreational River (NRR) in South Dakota and Nebraska. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/mnrr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_National_Recreational_River The Missouri National Recreational River is located on the border between Nebraska and South Dakota. The designation was first applied in 1978 to a 59-mile section of the Missouri River between Gavins Point Dam and Ponca State Park. In 1991, an additional 39-mile section between Fort Randall Dam and Niobrara, Nebraska, was added to the designation. These two stretches of the Missouri River are the only parts of the river between Montana and the mouth of the Missouri that remain undammed or unchannelized. The last 20 miles of the Niobrara River and 6 miles of Verdigre Creek were also added in 1991. Imagine a 100-mile stretch of North America's longest river, a vestige of the untamed American West. The Missouri National Recreational River is where imagination meets reality. Two free flowing stretches of the Missouri make up the National Park. Relive the past by making an exploration of the wild, untamed and mighty river that continues to flow as nature intended. The National Park Service headquarters is located at 508 East Second Street in Yankton, South Dakota. Missouri National Recreational River Headquarters The Missouri National Recreational River has a visitor contact station located inside their headquarters building in Yankton, South Dakota. Information about the park including junior ranger booklets, passport stamps, park maps, and an 18-minute video are available 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The building is closed on all federal holidays including Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's days. For more information please call  605-665-0209.  From US Highway 81 in Nebraska: Cross the bridge into South Dakota and take the first right onto Second Street. Go east 5 blocks; the office will be on your left. From US Highway 81 in South Dakota: Go through Yankton and take the last left turn before the bridge (2nd St.). Go east 5 blocks; the office will be on your left. From US Highway 50 west of Yankton: Turn right on Highway 81, go through Yankton and take the last left before the bridge (Second St) Go east 5 blocks; the office will be on your left. Bow Creek Primitive Camping Primitive, Leave No Trace camping is allowed and free. Camp only in designated sites marked with brown camping signs and metal fire rings. Please call us at 605-665-0209 and leave your basic itinerary for your safety. Located along Bow Creek and the Missouri River in Cedar County about 2 miles northeast of Wynot, Nebraska. A series of gravel roads wind you to the location by car. Follow the brown Bow Creek Recreational Area directional signs to the gravel parking lot and trailhead. Primitive Camping 0.00 Primitive, Leave No Trace camping. Bow Creek Primitive Camping Bow Creek bending to the left. Mowed grass trail bends to the right of the image. Bow Creek and mowed nature trail Goat Island Primitive Camping Two designated tent camping only areas. The first (southern) campground area is in the process of being established. The second (northern) is targeted to be established in 2022. Primitive camping is allowed anywhere on the Island, with the exception of the established hunting season after Labor Day to January when camping is restricted to the two designated camping areas. Please email or call (605-665-0209) for a back country use permit issued by the Park's HQ Office. Primitive Camping 0.00 Primitive, Leave No Trace camping. Aerial View of Goat Island Aerial view of Goat Island featuring sandbars and parallel channels of the Missouri River Aerial view of Goat Island Goat Island in the Autumn Aerial view of Goat Island in the fall at sunset. Burnt orange leafed trees and blue sky with clouds Goat Island Recreation Area in Autumn Goat Island Camping Primitive Camping site enclosed by trees. Leaves scatter the ground and two trees frame the image Goat Island Primitive Camping Green Island Primitive Camping Green Island has five primitive tent campsites with fire rings. Two isolated tent sites on the east side of the island & three adjacent sites on the west side. Fires allowed only in designated fire rings. Island access is by boat only. Please visit the Camping page for rules and regulations. Primitive, Leave No Trace camping is allowed and free. Camp only in designated sites marked with brown camping signs and metal fire rings. Please call us at 605-665-0209 and leave your basic itinerary for your safety. Primitive Camping 0.00 Primitive, Leave No Trace camping. Green Island Map Aerial map of Green Island Recreation Area with hiking trail, water trail access and campsites Green Island has five primitive campsites with fire rings. Two isolated tent sites on the east side of the island and three adjacent sites on the west side. Fires allowed only in designated fire rings. Island access is by boat only. Aerial of Missouri River Aerial view of the Missouri River and surrounding landscape. Aerial view of the Missouri River and surrounding landscape. Remains of a sunken steamboat in Missouri River. Sunken remains of the North Alabama steamboat appears only when water is low. Sunken remains of the North Alabama steamboat appears only when water is low. View of Missouri River Scenic view of Missouri River on a sunny day Scenic view of Missouri River on a sunny day Park trailer Park educational trailer Educational trailer with painted pictures All alone with my canoe A canoe loaded with gear sits quietly on a sandy river bank with blue sky above. Get into nature by paddling the Missouri River. Missouri Virtual Ranger Online Activities Missouri National Recreational River is an amazing place to explore in person and online. Become a MNRR Junior Ranger today by participating in our online activities that will help you explore the park virtually! View of blue water from the Missouri River overlooking the hills with green foliage NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Missouri National Recreational River, South Dakota and Nebraska Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] missouri river Bat Acoustic Monitoring at Missouri National Recreational River The Northern Great Plains Inventory and Monitoring Network monitors bats to detect long-term trends in bat populations at Missouri National Recreational River. Acoustic recorders detect the unique ultrasonic calls bats use for echolocation. Monitoring helps protect the bat communities that live and forage in the park. A gloved hand holds a brown bat. It has its mouth open and wing outstretched Landbird Monitoring at Missouri National Recreational River The lands surrounding the river corridors of Missouri National Recreational River support a broad diversity of ecosystems, ranging from wetlands and sand bars to cottonwood and bur oak woodlands as well as native prairie and grasslands. These diverse habitats support an equally diverse community of birds, including the endangered interior least tern and the threatened piping plover. Landbird surveys at Missouri National Recreational River started in 2015. greeny brown songbird with a striking black face, and yellow chest, perching on a twig National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Cretaceous Period—145.0 to 66.0 MYA Many now-arid western parks, including Chaco Culture National Historical Park and Mesa Verde National Park, were inundated by the Cretaceous Interior Seaway that bisected North America. Massive dinosaur and other reptile fossils are found in Cretaceous rocks of Big Bend National Park. dinosaur footprint in stone Mesozoic Era The Mesozoic Era (251.9 to 66 million years ago) was the "Age of Reptiles." During the Mesozoic, Pangaea began separating into the modern continents, and the modern Rocky Mountains rose. Dinosaurs, crocodiles, and pterosaurs ruled the land and air. As climate changed and rapid plate tectonics resulted in shallow ocean basins, sea levels rose world-wide and seas expanded across the center of North America. fossil dinosaur skull in rock face Imagining the Lewis and Clark Expedition competing in the Olympics The different members of the Corps of Discovery came from varied, unique backgrounds, and because of those backgrounds brought a variety of useful skills to the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Many of the skills and abilities possessed by Corps members translate well to the different events of the modern-day Olympics. As such, we’ve compiled a list of Olympic events, and which members of the Corps of Discovery had the best shot at bringing home gold! Olympic Training Center. Large building with American Flad

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