by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Montezuma Castle

National Monument - Arizona

Montezuma Castle National Monument protects a set of well-preserved dwellings located in Camp Verde, Arizona which were built and used by the Sinagua people, a pre-Columbian culture closely related to the Hohokam and other indigenous peoples of the southwestern United States, between approximately 1100 and 1425 AD. The main structure comprises five stories and twenty rooms, and was built over the course of three centuries.

maps

Official visitor map of Montezuma Castle National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Montezuma Castle - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Montezuma Castle National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the Cherry Show Me Ride Off-Highway Vehicle Route (OHV) near Jerome in Arizona. Published by Arizona State Parks & Trails.Show Me Ride OHV - Cherry

Map of the Cherry Show Me Ride Off-Highway Vehicle Route (OHV) near Jerome in Arizona. Published by Arizona State Parks & Trails.

Map of Sedona Show me Ride Route 3 OHV trail (Off-Highway Vehicle). Published by Arizona State Parks & Trails.Sedona - OHV Route 3

Map of Sedona Show me Ride Route 3 OHV trail (Off-Highway Vehicle). Published by Arizona State Parks & Trails.

Four Wheel Drive and Off-Highway Vehicle Routes around Sedona in Coconino National Forest (NF) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Sedona - OHV Trails

Four Wheel Drive and Off-Highway Vehicle Routes around Sedona in Coconino National Forest (NF) in Arizona. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) for Winter travel in Coconino National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Coconino MVUM - Winter 2017

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) for Winter travel in Coconino National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Eastern area of Prescott National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Prescott MVUM - East 2016

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the Eastern area of Prescott National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the South Half of Coconino National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Coconino MVUM - South 2020

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of the South Half of Coconino National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Yavapai County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Yavapai County

Yavapai County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/moca/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montezuma_Castle_National_Monument Montezuma Castle National Monument protects a set of well-preserved dwellings located in Camp Verde, Arizona which were built and used by the Sinagua people, a pre-Columbian culture closely related to the Hohokam and other indigenous peoples of the southwestern United States, between approximately 1100 and 1425 AD. The main structure comprises five stories and twenty rooms, and was built over the course of three centuries. Established December 8, 1906, Montezuma Castle is the third National Monument dedicated to preserving Native American culture. This 20 room high-rise apartment, nestled into a towering limestone cliff, tells a story of ingenuity, survival and ultimately, prosperity in an unforgiving desert landscape. Montezuma Castle: Follow I-17 to exit 289 (90 minutes north of Phoenix, 45 minutes south of Flagstaff). Drive east (through two traffic circles) for approximately 1/2 mile to the blinking red light. Turn left onto Montezuma Castle Road. Montezuma Well: Follow I-17 to exit 293 (north of the exit for Montezuma Castle). Continue through the towns of McGuireville and Rimrock, following the signs for 4 miles to the entrance to the Well. Montezuma Castle Visitor Center This visitor center provides the entrance fee station, as well as bathrooms, a small museum, and the Western National Parks Association bookstore. Stop in first to get all the information you need! Follow I-17 to exit 289 (90 minutes north of Phoenix, 45 minutes south of Flagstaff). Drive east (through two traffic circles) for approximately 1/2 mile to the blinking red light. Turn left onto Montezuma Castle Road. Storage Room at Montezuma Castle Two masonry walls with a dark doorway in a short cliff ledge. The Sinagua used space efficiently - here a storage room sits in a short cliff space below the main Castle. Window in Montezuma Castle Sun shines on the window sill in a masonry wall; trees in fall color are seen outside the window. Visitors to Montezuma Castle usually only get to see the dwelling from the outside. This view shows what the Sinagua might have seen. Montezuma Castle in the Cliff A 5-story masonry dwelling sits in a cliff alcove. Montezuma Castle was built in an alcove about 90 feet up a cliff. This protects the dwelling from flooding. Montezuma Well Two cliff dwellings and a tree with yellow leaves above a pond. Montezuma Well provided a stable source of water to the Sinagua. Climate and Water Monitoring at Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot National Monuments, 2018 At Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot national monuments, the precontact built environment reflects the importance of reliable water sources. At these parks, the Sonoran Desert Network monitors climate, groundwater, springs, and streams. Understanding changes in these closely linked factors helps managers make informed decisions affecting both natural and cultural resources. Learn about our recent findings in these special parks. A stream runs past a pool in a riparian area. Vegetation Mapping at Montezuma Castle National Monument Vegetation maps tell park managers what’s growing where, and what kinds of habitat occur in a park. This helps them with many planning, resource, and interpretive activities. At the two units of Montezuma Castle National Monument, the Sonoran Desert Network mapped 12 different vegetation associations. The park’s vegetation can be classified into two broad types: riparian woodlands and gallery forests, and thornscrub communities in rocky uplands. Green leafy shrub; cliff dwelling in background It’s Alive! Biological Soil Crusts of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts It might come as a surprise to learn that in the sublime expanses of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts, some of the most interesting life around can be found in the dirt right in front of your feet! Biological soil crusts form a living groundcover that is the foundation of desert plant life. Soil crust at White Sands National Monument 2011 SCPN-NAU Student Projects In spring 2011, the SCPN-NAU School of Communication collaboration began with a multimedia studies course focused on documenting park resources and resource projects. The class was taught by NAU professors Laura Camden and Peter Friederici. 2011 Student Projects Monitoring Upland Vegetation and Soils in the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert Networks Vegetation and soils are two of many natural resources monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Learning about vegetation dynamics helps us to better understand the integrity of ecological processes, productivity trends, and ecosystem interactions that can otherwise be difficult to monitor. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor vegetation and soils using the scientific protocol described here. Quadrat used for biological soil crust sampling Streams Monitoring in the Sonoran Desert and Southern Plains Because of their importance, streams were chosen as a focus for monitoring in the National Park Service (NPS) Sonoran Desert and Southern Plains inventory and monitoring networks. Portions of several major river systems (or their tributaries) are found within many parks of both networks. Monitoring water quality from a boat Wildland Fire: Defensible Space Created—Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot The Zion and Saguaro Wildland Fire Modules conducted hazard assessments of park structures and infrastructure within Montezuma Castle, Montezuma Well, and Tuzigoot National Monuments. They also reduced fuels near buildings to create defensible space around park administrative buildings, housing, and infrastructure from future wildfires. firefighters work near a stone wall and propane tank in a desert environment. Module Conducts Wildland-Urban Interface Projects Throughout the Intermountain Region In 2013, the Saguaro Wildland Fire Module (WFM) managed multiple projects simultaneously in AZ, TX, and NM. WFMs are highly skilled and versatile fire crews that provide expertise in long-term planning, ignitions, holding, prescribed fire preparation and implementation support, hazardous fuels reduction, and fire effects monitoring. With their help, fire fulfills its natural or historic role to meet resource and management objectives and create fire-adapted communities. Climate and Water Monitoring at Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot National Monuments, 2017 At Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot national monuments, the precontact built environment reflects the importance of reliable water sources. At these parks, the Sonoran Desert Network monitors the health of Beaver Creek, Wet Beaver Creek, and the Verde River. The program is designed to detect broad-scale changes in ecological condition by observing certain parameters over time—and to give park managers early warning of any issues they may need to address. Streams monitoring on the Verde River at Tuzigoot National Monument Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Southwest River Environments In the arid Southwest, water means life, and prehistorically, rivers were the lifelines of the people. The Colorado River flowing through a canyon Transition Highlands and the Mogollon Rim The Transition Highlands, or Central Mountains, consist of numerous rugged low mountains marking the boundary between the tablelands of the Colorado Plateau and the southern deserts. Looking out from the Gila Cliff Dwellings Climate Monitoring in the Southern Plains, Sonoran Desert, and Chihuahuan Desert Climate is one of many ecological indicators monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Climate data help scientists to understand ecosystem processes and help to explain many of the patterns and trends observed in other natural-resource monitoring. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor climate using the scientific protocol described here. Kayaking across a fl ooded parking lot, Chickasaw NRA, July 2007. Arizona: Montezuma Castle National Monument In the Verde Valley of Arizona, Montezuma Castle National Monument protects an impressive cliff dwelling, Montezuma Castle, and a large sinkhole. Montezuma Well, that were important to early peoples as they gradually transitioned from highly mobile societies to more sedentary ways of life. Montezuma Castle National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Montezuma Castle National Monument, Arizona Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] Montezuma Castle Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Series: SCPN-NAU School of Communication Collaboration The Southern Colorado Plateau Network (SCPN) of the National Park Service has been partnering with the Northern Arizona University (NAU) School of Communication since 2011 to develop student multimedia projects that highlight resources and activities in network parks. This collaboration gives NAU students hands-on experience in creating multimedia projects and provides network parks with products that can help to promote their unique resources and scientific or educational project work. SCPN-NAU student projects Two for the Price of One Companion, assistant, confidant, ambassador, host, nurse, cook, secretary, editor, field technician, wildlife wrangler, diplomat, and social director are some of the many roles that people who marry into the NPS perform in support of their spouses and the NPS mission. Although the wives and daughters of park rangers were some of the earliest women rangers in the NPS, many more women served as “park wives” in the 1920s–1940s. Three members of a family The Heliograph: 2020 Edition The Heliograph is the official newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. This issue features stories on how we adapted our operations to minimize field work lost to the covid-19 pandemic, vegetation mapping at Saguaro NP, and communication improvements and opportunities for network parks. We also probe the minds of our interns and celebrate a high honor for our program manager. heliograph The Heliograph: Summer 2021 The Heliograph is the official newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. This issue shares predictive tools and planning processes that can help park managers make proactive decisions in the face of climate change. We also explore some explanations for this spring's highly unusual saguaro bloom, celebrate our staff members, and provide updates on our monitoring projects. heliograph Developing New Interpretations from Old Data at Montezuma Castle National Monument The Castle A site located within the Montezuma Castle NM was initially excavated in 1934 by NPS archeologists Martin Jackson and Sallie Pierce. They concluded a catastrophic fire destroyed the site long after abandonment, an interpretation that has persisted for over 80 years. A reanalysis of ceramic data coupled with archaeomagnetic dating suggests this initial interpretation is incorrect. Montezuma Castle and the Antiquities Act This imposing cliff dwelling, mistakenly associated with the Aztec emperor, was home to Sinagua Indians until about 600 years ago. Montezuma Castle National Monument, established on December 8, 1906, was noted for being “of the greatest ethnological value and scientific interest” (Proc. No. 696) and later as having “prehistoric ruins and ancient dwellings ... of great interest to the public” (Proc. No. 2226). Professional archeological exploration began with NPS management. Cliff dwelling ruins through the trees. Montezuma Well Yoga Can't visit in-person? To help relax and stay grounded, we came up with fun nature-inspired yoga poses you can practice no matter where you are. A Park Ranger demonstrates bee pose at Montezuma Well next to blooming flowers.
National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Park News and Visitor Guide Montezuma Castle and Tuzigoot National Monuments V O L U M E 5 • N U M B ER 1 Fall 2010 / Winter 2011 Welcome to the Monuments of the Verde Valley The Verde Valley, lying under the spectacular pine-clad cliffs of the Mogollon Rim of central Arizona, forms an immense biological transition between desert, grassland, and forest vegetation zones. As the seasons change, this endangered riparian or streamside habitat of the Verde River serves as a migration corridor for many animals traveling from summer to winter ranges in the south. But for thousands of years, the Verde Valley was also a haven for the movement of people, providing the food and water all life needs for survival. The national monuments of the Verde Valley­—Montezuma Castle, Montezuma Well, and Tuzigoot—protect and interpret the legacy of the Sinagua culture, a Native people who flourished in the area for centuries, long before Columbus claimed to have discovered this New World. Montezuma Castle has been described as the best preserved and most dramatic cliff dwelling in the United States. Montezuma Well is a natural limestone sinkhole with prehistoric sites and several animal species found nowhere else in the world. Tuzigoot is the remains of a 110-room pueblo perched on a high ridge with a panoramic view of the Verde River. Today’s visitors marvel at the well-preserved Sinagua dwellings, but also allow some time to experience the oasis of the riparian area. As the seasons change, we invite you to ENJOY! — Kathy M. Davis, Superintendent Echoes from the Past Discovering the 10,000 year legacy of people in the Verde Valley A visit to Montezuma Castle, Montezuma Well, and Tuzigoot National Monuments provokes many questions. Why did they live here? Where did they go? And, perhaps most importantly, how did they live in this land of seemingly harsh contrasts: hot and arid in the summer, cool in the winter? continued on page 4 C O NTENT S General Information Montezuma Castle The Sinagua—Echoes from the Past Montezuma Well Tuzigoot Park Science and Outreach Flagstaff Area Monuments Become A Junior Ranger! Local Friends and Partners Western National Parks Association 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 G ENERAL IN F O R M ATI O N Protect your Monuments National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Montezuma Castle & Tuzigoot National Monuments Superintendent Kathy M. Davis Mailing Address P.O. Box 219 Camp Verde, AZ 86322 Website www.nps.gov/moca www.nps.gov/tuzi Park Headquarters Email ph: (928) 567-5276 moca_ranger_activities@nps.gov fax: (928) 567-3597 Montezuma Castle 2800 Montezuma Castle Rd. Camp Verde, AZ 86322 (928) 567-3322 Montezuma Well 5525 Beaver Creek Rd. Rimrock, AZ 86335 (928) 567-4521 Tuzigoot 25 W. Tuzigoot Rd. Clarkdale, AZ 86324 (928) 634-5564 Hours of Operation (Closed Christmas Day) September–May: Daily 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. June–August: Daily 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Park Entrance Fees and Passes Daily Entrance Fees for Montezuma Castle or Tuzigoot: $5 per adult (16 & over) Children FREE (under 16) Combined Fees for Montezuma Castle AND Tuzigoot: $8 per adult (16 & over) Children FREE (under 16) Interagency Annual Pass: $80 Grants access to all federal fee areas in the U.S. (with some exceptions), including all national parks and monuments, for twelve months from date of purchase. Interagency Senior Pass: $10 A one-time fee grants access to all federal fee areas in the U.S. (with some exceptions). For U.S. citizens or permanent residents 62 years of age or older. Interagency Access Pass: FREE Grants access to all federal fee areas in the U.S. (with some exceptions) for permanently disabled U.S. citizens or permanent residents. • The arid desert landscape is very fragile, and wildfires are a real danger. Smoking is permitted in designated areas only. • All the monuments are protecting archeological sites, as well as natural resources. It is against the law to tamper with, deface or remove any artifact, plant, rock, or other natural feature of the park. • Hiking off the trails can damage the soil crust—a living groundcover of lichens, mosses, and other organisms. • Off-road parking or driving is prohibited. • Please help with trash removal and use the waste receptacles. We have an active recycling program for aluminum cans and plastic bottles, with designated brown receptacles. • Camping is prohibited in all areas of the monuments. • Bicycles, skateboards, and any motorized vehicle other than wheelchairs are not permitted on the trails. • Gas stoves are permitted only at the Montezuma Well picnic area. No ashproducing fires are allowed in the monuments. Protect Yourself • Remember to drink lots of water, use sunscreen, and wear a hat! If you feel thirsty, you are already on the way to being dehydrated. Be prepared with appropriate footwear and clothing for temperatures that can exceed 100°F (3

also available

National Parks
USFS NW