by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Mojave

National Preserve - California

Mojave National Preserve is in Southern California, in the Mojave Desert. It spans woodland, rugged mountains and canyons and shelters animals like mountain lions, coyotes and bats. The huge, steep sand mounds of the Kelso Dunes are known for making "singing" sounds. Cima Dome is a large granite mass covered with Joshua trees. The Hole-in-the-Wall cliffs are peppered with holes and crevices.

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maps

Official visitor map of Mojave National Preserve (NPRES) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Mojave - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Mojave National Preserve (NPRES) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lake Mead - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Map of Mojave Trails National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mojave Trails - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Mojave Trails National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Vintage 1954 USGS 1:250000 map of Needles in California and Arizona. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Needles - 1954

Vintage 1954 USGS 1:250000 map of Needles in California and Arizona. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Kingman in Arizona, California and Nevada. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Kingman - 1947

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Kingman in Arizona, California and Nevada. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1953 USGS 1:250000 map of San Bernardino in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - San Bernardino - 1953

Vintage 1953 USGS 1:250000 map of San Bernardino in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Bakersfield in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Vintage USGS - Trona - 1947

Vintage 1947 USGS 1:250000 map of Bakersfield in California. Published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

https://www.nps.gov/moja https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojave_National_Preserve Mojave National Preserve is in Southern California, in the Mojave Desert. It spans woodland, rugged mountains and canyons and shelters animals like mountain lions, coyotes and bats. The huge, steep sand mounds of the Kelso Dunes are known for making "singing" sounds. Cima Dome is a large granite mass covered with Joshua trees. The Hole-in-the-Wall cliffs are peppered with holes and crevices. Mojave preserves a diverse mosaic of ecological habitats and a 10,000 year history of human connection with the desert. Offering extensive opportunities to experience desert landscapes, the preserve promotes understanding and appreciation for the increasingly threatened resources of the Mojave Desert. This remote preserve encourages a sense of discovery and a connection to wild places. Note: There is no fuel inside the Preserve. Please fill up with gas BEFORE you enter. Park headquarters in Barstow, California is 60 miles from the Preserve, and offers maps, a bookstore and information. Our main visitor center, Kelso Depot, is located inside the Preserve, 95 miles east of Barstow, and 90 miles west of Las Vegas, at the intersection of Kelso-Cima and Kelbaker Roads. Hole-in-the-Wall Information Center Ranger staff, park brochures, drinking water, and passport stamps are available. Limited maps, books, postcards and other items available for purchase with the Western National Parks Association. Exhibits are under construction. From I-40: Exit Essex Road and drive north 10 miles to the junction with Black Canyon Road. Hole-in-the-Wall is 10 miles north on Black Canyon Road. Kelso Depot Visitor Center Originally opened in 1924 as a train station, Kelso Depot was renovated and reopened in 2005 a Visitor Center for Mojave National Preserve. Former dormitory rooms contain exhibits describing the cultural and natural history of the surrounding desert. The baggage room, ticket office and two dormitory rooms have been furnished to illustrate depot life during the first half of the twentieth century. A 20-minute orientation film is shown in the theater. Note: Kelso Depot is currently closed for repairs. From I-15: Exit Kelbaker Road at Baker, Calif., and drive south 34 miles to Kelso Depot. From I-40: Exit Kelbaker Road (28 miles east of Ludlow, Calif.) and drive north 22 miles to Kelso Depot. Black Canyon Group and Equestrian Campground While the campgrounds at Mid Hills and Hole-in-the-Wall accommodate a maximum of 8 people and 2 vehicles per site, the Black Canyon Equestrian & Group Campground (located across the road from Hole-in-the-Wall Information Center) is ideal for larger groups. The campsite is available to groups of 15-50 people and reservations are required. Call (760) 252-6101 to make a reservation up to 12 months in advance. No water available. Campers must fetch water at nearby Hole-in-the-Wall Campground. Black Canyon Equestrian and Group Campground 25.00 The Black Canyon Equestrian & Group Campground (located on the east side of Black Canyon Road at Hole-in-the-Wall) is ideal for larger groups. Fees are per site (either group or equestrian), per night. Group site picnic shelter A shade structure consisting of beams holding up a solid roof. Underneath are six picnic tables. A shaded pavilion protects several picnic tables from the intense desert sun Group site tent area A garbage receptacle at a small sign that says "tent camping, no vehicles" stand in a cleared area The group site has room for dozens of tents. Bathrooms Two pit toilets stand between desert shrubbery at the group campsite. The two pit toilets are shared between the group site and the neighboring equestrian site. Equestrian site corrals The view of all the horse corrals lined up next to each other. Posts to tie horses are also provided Several metal corrals are provided to contain pack animals at the equestrian site Equestrian Site fire area Four picnic tables, a BBQ pit, a fire pit, a garbage receptacle, and a shade tree Fires are permitted in the provided fire pits at the equestrian site and group site. Hole-in-the-Wall Campground At 4,400 feet in elevation, Hole-in-the-Wall Campground is surrounded by sculptured volcanic rock walls and makes a great basecamp for hikers. Thirty-five campsites accommodate RVs and tents; two walk-in sites are also available. Hole-in-the-Wall Campground Fee 12.00 $12 per site per night, $6 for America the Beautiful Senior/Access Pass holders. Fees are per site per night. Campsites accommodate a maximum of 8 people with 2 vehicles (including a camping unit—i.e., trailer, motor home, converted van, etc.). Black Canyon Equestrian and Group Campground 25.00 The Black Canyon Equestrian & Group Campground (located on the east side of Black Canyon Road at Hole-in-the-Wall) is ideal for larger groups. Fees are per site (either group or equestrian), per night. HITW Campsite A rock fire ring and picnic table, with holey rock formations in the background The volcanic rock formations at Hole in the Wall are a gorgeous backdrop to the campsites HITW RV site A large RV and truck are pulled into a campsite. A small child with his back turned is in the front Many sites at HITW are accessible to RVs HITW campsite 2 A campsite: cleared area, raised fire pit, picnic table, rock formations, desert shrubbery Typical campsite at Hole in the Wall campground Mid-Hills Campground The Hackberry Fire swept through the Mid Hills area in June 2005, burning much of the vegetation. About half of the 26 campsites were left unburned, however, and remain surrounded by pinyon pine and juniper trees. At 5,600 feet in elevation, Mid Hills is much cooler than the desert floor below. The access road is unpaved and somewhat steep, and is therefore not recommended for large motorhomes or trailers. Water is not available at Mid Hills Campground. Mid-Hills Campground Fee 12.00 Fees are per site per night. Sites are not designed for motorhomes or trailers and cannot accommodate vehicles of this length. Short rigs, such as a truck with a camper top are welcome. Access roads are unpaved and are high clearance is recommended. Mid Hills A campsite at Mid Hills Campground featuring a tree, fire pit, and picnic table Campsites at MId Hills feature fire pits and picnic tables Access Road and Bathrooms A campground road. Garbage and recycling containers and a bathroom building are also shown There are garbage and recycling containers in the campground, as well as bathroom buildings Campgsite with fire damage A campsite with a picnic table and fire pit. There are several tree skeletons in the background About half of the campsites at Mid Hills suffered losses in the Hackberry Fire in 2005. Tree skeletons still remain at those locations. Mid Hills 2 A tall tree shades a picnic table at a Mid Hills campsite A tall tree shades a picnic table at a Mid Hills campsite Kelso Dunes Kelso Dunes with rays of light coming through the clouds. Mountains in the background.. Kelso Dunes is the most popular hike at Mojave National Preserve. A desert road surrounded by spring wildflowers Spring wildflowers carpeting the desert floor Many people visit Mojave in the spring season to view stunning wildflower displays. Desert Wildlife A desert tortoise rest in the shade of a bush near some hikers Mojave has a great diversity of wildlife. In spring and fall, the elusive desert tortoise can be seen foraging food. Hiking Opportunities Abound A lonely desert trail leads to tall sand dunes Mojave has endless options for hikers. Kelso Sand Dunes are a popular trail in cooler months. Stunning Vistas A man standing on a mountain peak in front of a wide desert landscape Mojave is a hiker's paradise. With no less than 9 named mountain ranges int he park, there's no shortage of amazing views to be had. Rich Human History A Joshua tree seen though the window of an old miner's cabin Visitors can still hear the echos of history here. Evidence of days long past still persist in Mojave. Native American petroglyphs, long-abandoned mines, and cattle ranches still dot the landscape. Kelso Dunes Kelso Dunes with rays of light coming through the clouds. Mountains in the background.. Kelso Dunes is the most popular hike at Mojave National Preserve. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Mojave National Preserve, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] sunset over new york mountains 2009 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2009 Environmental Achievement Awards National Park Service Finds Success at Hiring Event The National Park Service Fire and Aviation Program participated in a hiring event sponsored by the Department of Interior. The special hiring event was held in Bakersfield, CA and was a collaboration of all four natural resource management bureaus to hire open wildland fire positions in 2020. Employees talk to potential job candidates in front of a large promotional panel. Women of the West Women's stories have sometimes been overlooked or actively covered up in historical narratives, especially those concerning westward expansion. But many women made empowered choices to go to (and stay in) the California desert. Two of these women, Frances Keys and Elizabeth Campbell, are especially prominent in Joshua Tree's history. historic photo of a group of people, three standing women and one seated man Save Water: Live Like a Desert Native Water conservation is always important in the desert, but saving water is even more critical during the current period of historic drought in the state of California. We can learn about how to be water-wise by looking to the example of native desert species, which have evolved to cope with rains that are not only scarce but unpredictable. open desert landscape The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand Respiratory Disease Outbreak Among Bighorn Sheep in Joshua Tree National Park Bighorn sheep were once common in Southern California and Nevada, but after more than a century of impacts from disease, unregulated hunting, and habitat loss, their numbers were in sharp decline. Since the 1960s, cooperative efforts from state and federal agencies to rebuild the herds were paying off, but now a disease outbreak at Joshua Tree National Park may pose a major threat to the majestic animals. bighorn sheep lamb showing symptoms of disease, with adult bighorn nearby General Patton's World War II Training Ground in the Mojave The Mojave Desert, a "wasteland" with easy railroad access, seemed to General George S. Patton to be an excellent place to train his troops during World War II. In early 1942, Patton established the Desert Training Center, and stationed troops throughout the Mojave. US Troops in the Mojave Desert in 1942 El Niño in a Time of Historic Drought Deserts, by definition, get scant rainfall. Add the effects of a record drought, and it's crucial that desert dwellers and visitors alike focus on conserving water ... even when El Niño brings rains to some parts of California. mud cracks Desert Bighorn Sheep: Connecting a Desert Landscape Desert bighorn sheep live on islands of mountain habitat and use surrounding desert for travel and food. These same desert areas contain a variety of human-made barriers that threaten the area’s individual bighorn herds. Researchers are collecting data that will provide telling information about how we can help support and protect bighorn populations across the Mojave Desert into the future. Up close bighorn sheep standing on top of a large rock. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Proterozoic Eon—2.5 Billion to 541 MYA The Proterozoic Eon is the most recent division of the Precambrian. It is also the longest geologic eon, beginning 2.5 billion years ago and ending 541 million years ago fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center The Mojave Road & The Old Spanish Trail The Mojave Road is a well preserved mid-nineteenth century linear transportation corridor linking a series of historically significant springs across a vast expanse of desert basins and ranges. It passes through Mojave National Preserve and is a branch of the Old Spanish National Historic Trail. Learn more about the history of this site, listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Find Your Park on Route 66 Route 66 and the National Park Service have always had an important historical connection. Route 66 was known as the great road west and after World War II families on vacation took to the road in great numbers to visit the many National Park Service sites in the Southwest and beyond. That connection remains very alive and present today. Take a trip down Route 66 and Find Your Park today! A paved road with fields in the distance. On the road is a white Oklahoma Route 66 emblem. Bighorn and Big Rail Can Be Friends The Brightline West high-speed railway could be bad news for desert bighorn sheep in Mojave National Preserve. We know how to fix that. Desert bighorn sheep ewe and lamb with rocks behind them. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Christina Aiello Read about Christina's work with desert bighorn sheep and paving her own path. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. graphic of a photo of a woman in the field. Text reads Christina Aiello NPF Foundation Volcanic Domes Lava domes are steep-sided rounded accumulations of highly viscous silicic lava over a vent. Some domes are part of composite volcanoes, but large ones can make up their own volcanoes. Lassen Peak is a dome. photo of a rounded hill of blocky rock Mary Beal Botanist, photographer, and writer Mary Beal often took people by surprise when they came across her all alone in the Mojave Desert. Photo of woman in simple dress standing next to old man with beard in front of tent home. Women in Landscape-Scale Conservation: Christina Aiello Christina Aiello works a lot with corridor connectivity for desert bighorn sheep, but she explains that no matter what your skillset is, you can contribute to landscape-scale conservation. close up of woman standing in desert Cinder Cones Cinder cones are typically simple volcanoes that consist of accumulations of ash and cinders around a vent. Sunset Crater Volcano and Capulin Volcano are cinder cones. photo of a dry grassy field with a cinder cone in the distance Series: Volcano Types Volcanoes vary in size from small cinder cones that stand only a few hundred feet tall to the most massive mountains on earth. photo of a volcanic mountain with snow and ice Monogenetic Volcanic Fields Monogenetic volcanic fields are areas covered by volcanic rocks where each of the volcanic vents typically only erupt once. Monogenetic volcanic fields typically contain cinder cones, fissure volcanoes, and/or maars and tuff rings. They also usually encompass large areas covered by basaltic lava flows. oblique aerial photo of a lava flow that extended into a body of water

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