by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Mojave

National Preserve - California

Mojave National Preserve is in Southern California, in the Mojave Desert. It spans woodland, rugged mountains and canyons and shelters animals like mountain lions, coyotes and bats. The huge, steep sand mounds of the Kelso Dunes are known for making "singing" sounds. Cima Dome is a large granite mass covered with Joshua trees. The Hole-in-the-Wall cliffs are peppered with holes and crevices.

maps

Official visitor map of Mojave National Preserve (NPRES) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Mojave - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Mojave National Preserve (NPRES) in California. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lake Mead - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lake Mead National Recreation Area (NRA) in Arizona and Nevada. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Visitor Map of Mojave Trails National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Mojave Trails - Visitor Map

Visitor Map of Mojave Trails National Monument (NM) in California. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

https://www.nps.gov/moja https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mojave_National_Preserve Mojave National Preserve is in Southern California, in the Mojave Desert. It spans woodland, rugged mountains and canyons and shelters animals like mountain lions, coyotes and bats. The huge, steep sand mounds of the Kelso Dunes are known for making "singing" sounds. Cima Dome is a large granite mass covered with Joshua trees. The Hole-in-the-Wall cliffs are peppered with holes and crevices. Singing sand dunes, cinder cone volcanoes, a large Joshua tree forest, and carpets of spring wildflowers are all found within this 1.6-million-acre park. A visit to its canyons, mountains, and mesas will reveal long-abandoned mines, homesteads, and rock-walled military outposts. Located between Los Angeles and Las Vegas, Mojave provides serenity and solitude from major metropolitan areas. Note: There is no fuel inside the Preserve. Please fill up with gas BEFORE you enter. Park headquarters in Barstow, California is 60 miles from the Preserve, and offers maps, a bookstore and information. Our main visitor center, Kelso Depot, is located inside the Preserve, 95 miles east of Barstow, and 90 miles west of Las Vegas, at the intersection of Kelso-Cima and Kelbaker Roads. Barstow Headquarters Only Basic services available such as information, brochures, or stamps. Ring doorbell for service. Subject to staff availability. From I-15: Exit Barstow Road at Barstow, Calif. Continue south to 2701 Barstow Road. Hole-in-the-Wall Information Center Ranger staff, park brochures, drinking water, and passport stamps are available. Exhibits and bookstore area are under renovation for 2021 and 2022. From I-40: Exit Essex Road and drive north 10 miles to the junction with Black Canyon Road. Hole-in-the-Wall is 10 miles north on Black Canyon Road. Kelso Depot Visitor Center Originally opened in 1924 as a train station, Kelso Depot was renovated and reopened in 2005 as the Visitor Center for Mojave National Preserve. Former dormitory rooms contain exhibits describing the cultural and natural history of the surrounding desert. The baggage room, ticket office and two dormitory rooms have been furnished to illustrate depot life during the first half of the twentieth century. A 20-minute orientation film is shown in the theater. From I-15: Exit Kelbaker Road at Baker, Calif., and drive south 34 miles to Kelso Depot. From I-40: Exit Kelbaker Road (28 miles east of Ludlow, Calif.) and drive north 22 miles to Kelso Depot. Black Canyon Group and Equestrian Campground While the campgrounds at Mid Hills and Hole-in-the-Wall accommodate a maximum of 8 people and 2 vehicles per site, the Black Canyon Equestrian & Group Campground (located across the road from Hole-in-the-Wall Information Center) is ideal for larger groups. The campsite is available to groups of 15-50 people and reservations are required. Call (760) 252-6101 to make a reservation up to 12 months in advance. NO WATER AVAILABLE AS OF APRIL 2021. Campers must fetch water at nearby Hole-in-the-Wall Campground. Black Canyon Group and Equestrian Campground Fee 25.00 Fees are per site per night. Group site picnic shelter A shade structure consisting of beams holding up a solid roof. Underneath are six picnic tables. A shaded pavilion protects several picnic tables from the intense desert sun Group site tent area A garbage receptacle at a small sign that says "tent camping, no vehicles" stand in a cleared area The group site has room for dozens of tents. Bathrooms Two pit toilets stand between desert shrubbery at the group campsite. The two pit toilets are shared between the group site and the neighboring equestrian site. Equestrian site corrals The view of all the horse corrals lined up next to each other. Posts to tie horses are also provided Several metal corrals are provided to contain pack animals at the equestrian site Equestrian Site fire area Four picnic tables, a BBQ pit, a fire pit, a garbage receptacle, and a shade tree Fires are permitted in the provided fire pits at the equestrian site and group site. Hole-in-the-Wall Campground At 4,400 feet in elevation, Hole-in-the-Wall Campground is surrounded by sculptured volcanic rock walls and makes a great basecamp for hikers. Thirty-five campsites accommodate RVs and tents; two walk-in sites are also available. Hole-in-the-Wall Campground Fee 12.00 Fees are per site per night. Campsites accommodate a maximum of 8 people with 2 vehicles (including a camping unit—i.e., trailer, motor home, converted van, etc.). HITW Campsite A rock fire ring and picnic table, with holey rock formations in the background The volcanic rock formations at Hole in the Wall are a gorgeous backdrop to the campsites HITW RV site A large RV and truck are pulled into a campsite. A small child with his back turned is in the front Many sites at HITW are accessible to RVs HITW campsite 2 A campsite: cleared area, raised fire pit, picnic table, rock formations, desert shrubbery Typical campsite at Hole in the Wall campground Mid-Hills Campground The Hackberry Fire swept through the Mid Hills area in June 2005, burning much of the vegetation. About half of the 26 campsites were left unburned, however, and remain surrounded by pinyon pine and juniper trees. At 5,600 feet in elevation, Mid Hills is much cooler than the desert floor below. The access road is unpaved and somewhat steep, and is therefore not recommended for large motorhomes or trailers. Water is not available at Mid Hills Campground. Mid-Hills Campground Fee 12.00 Fees are per site per night. Sites are not designed for motorhomes or trailers and cannot accommodate vehicles of this length. Short rigs, such as a truck with a camper top are welcome. Access roads are unpaved and are high clearance is recommended. Mid Hills A campsite at Mid Hills Campground featuring a tree, fire pit, and picnic table Campsites at MId Hills feature fire pits and picnic tables Access Road and Bathrooms A campground road. Garbage and recycling containers and a bathroom building are also shown There are garbage and recycling containers in the campground, as well as bathroom buildings Campgsite with fire damage A campsite with a picnic table and fire pit. There are several tree skeletons in the background About half of the campsites at Mid Hills suffered losses in the Hackberry Fire in 2005. Tree skeletons still remain at those locations. Mid Hills 2 A tall tree shades a picnic table at a Mid Hills campsite A tall tree shades a picnic table at a Mid Hills campsite Kelso Dunes Kelso Dunes with rays of light coming through the clouds. Mountains in the background.. Kelso Dunes is the most popular hike at Mojave National Preserve. A desert road surrounded by spring wildflowers Spring wildflowers carpeting the desert floor Many people visit Mojave in the spring season to view stunning wildflower displays. Hiking Opportunities Abound A lonely desert trail leads to tall sand dunes Mojave has endless options for hikers. Kelso Sand Dunes are a popular trail in cooler months. Desert Wildlife A desert tortoise rest in the shade of a bush near some hikers Mojave has a great diversity of wildlife. In spring and fall, the elusive desert tortoise can be seen foraging food. Stunning Vistas A man standing on a mountain peak in front of a wide desert landscape Mojave is a hiker's paradise. With no less than 9 named mountain ranges int he park, there's no shortage of amazing views to be had. Rich Human History A Joshua tree seen though the window of an old miner's cabin Visitors can still hear the echos of history here. Evidence of days long past still persist in Mojave. Native American petroglyphs, long-abandoned mines, and cattle ranches still dot the landscape. Kelso Dunes Kelso Dunes with rays of light coming through the clouds. Mountains in the background.. Kelso Dunes is the most popular hike at Mojave National Preserve. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Mojave National Preserve, California Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] sunset over new york mountains 2009 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2009 Environmental Achievement Awards National Park Service Finds Success at Hiring Event The National Park Service Fire and Aviation Program participated in a hiring event sponsored by the Department of Interior. The special hiring event was held in Bakersfield, CA and was a collaboration of all four natural resource management bureaus to hire open wildland fire positions in 2020. Employees talk to potential job candidates in front of a large promotional panel. Women of the West Women's stories have sometimes been overlooked or actively covered up in historical narratives, especially those concerning westward expansion. But many women made empowered choices to go to (and stay in) the California desert. Two of these women, Frances Keys and Elizabeth Campbell, are especially prominent in Joshua Tree's history. historic photo of a group of people, three standing women and one seated man Save Water: Live Like a Desert Native Water conservation is always important in the desert, but saving water is even more critical during the current period of historic drought in the state of California. We can learn about how to be water-wise by looking to the example of native desert species, which have evolved to cope with rains that are not only scarce but unpredictable. open desert landscape The Adverse Effects of Climate Change on Desert Bighorn Sheep Climate change has and will continue to have a negative impact on the population of desert bighorn sheep. For the remaining herds to survive, management may always be necessary. Protecting wild lands is key to the survival of these amazing animals. Desert bighorn sheep, NPS/Shawn Cigrand Respiratory Disease Outbreak Among Bighorn Sheep in Joshua Tree National Park Bighorn sheep were once common in Southern California and Nevada, but after more than a century of impacts from disease, unregulated hunting, and habitat loss, their numbers were in sharp decline. Since the 1960s, cooperative efforts from state and federal agencies to rebuild the herds were paying off, but now a disease outbreak at Joshua Tree National Park may pose a major threat to the majestic animals. bighorn sheep lamb showing symptoms of disease, with adult bighorn nearby General Patton's World War II Training Ground in the Mojave The Mojave Desert, a "wasteland" with easy railroad access, seemed to General George S. Patton to be an excellent place to train his troops during World War II. In early 1942, Patton established the Desert Training Center, and stationed troops throughout the Mojave. US Troops in the Mojave Desert in 1942 El Niño in a Time of Historic Drought Deserts, by definition, get scant rainfall. Add the effects of a record drought, and it's crucial that desert dwellers and visitors alike focus on conserving water ... even when El Niño brings rains to some parts of California. mud cracks Desert Bighorn Sheep: Connecting a Desert Landscape Desert bighorn sheep live on islands of mountain habitat and use surrounding desert for travel and food. These same desert areas contain a variety of human-made barriers that threaten the area’s individual bighorn herds. Researchers are collecting data that will provide telling information about how we can help support and protect bighorn populations across the Mojave Desert into the future. Up close bighorn sheep standing on top of a large rock. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park The Precambrian The Precambrian was the "Age of Early Life." During the Precambrian, continents formed and our modern atmosphere developed, while early life evolved and flourished. Soft-bodied creatures like worms and jellyfish lived in the world's oceans, but the land remained barren. Common Precambrian fossils include stromatolites and similar structures, which are traces of mats of algae-like microorganisms, and microfossils of other microorganisms. fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Proterozoic Eon—2.5 Billion to 541 MYA The Proterozoic Eon is the most recent division of the Precambrian. It is also the longest geologic eon, beginning 2.5 billion years ago and ending 541 million years ago fossil stromatolites in a cliff face Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center
Park News & Guide National Park Service U.S. Department of the Interior Issue 25/2015-2016 COURTESY NASA/JET PROPULSION LABORATORY--CALTECH Mojave National Preserve Black Canyon campground with a sky added from an astrophoto A Head Start for Endangered Tortoises? By Phillip Gomez NPS/KNIGHTEN An unpretentious little building surrounded by a security fence just off Ivanpah Road near the northeast entrance to Mojave National Preserve has an ambitious purpose: to improve the chances of baby desert tortoises to survive to maturity and to produce vital offspring. The cryptic lives of tortoises—spent predominantly in underground burrows— and the many years that it takes for them to reach sexual maturity and to reproduce have made it difficult for conservation biologists to conduct field studies. For this long-term research project, juvenile tortoises are being “recruited” over a 20-year period and nurtured in this facility until they are capable of joining the Ivanpah Valley’s population with a reasonable chance for survival. The idea for this experiment in wildlife management, entitled Desert Tortoise Juvenile Survivorship at Mojave National Preserve—or Head Start to researchers—is similar to the principle underlying children’s nursery schooling: giving kids a head start in life. Welcome to Mojave National Preserve. We are glad you have made the decision to spend some of your time exploring and discovering the treasures of the Mojave Desert. NPS/GOMEZ So, the National Park Service, together with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Chevron Corp., Molycorp Inc., and two universities have partnered to create a working facility to try to gain a better understanding of tortoise behavior that affects their survival. The Ivanpah Desert Research Facility is staffed by a small team of faculty and Ph.D. candidates from the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory of the University of Georgia and from the University of California, Davis. Welcome to Mojave! Two yearling tortoise siblings explore their enclosure. The smaller one follows “big brother,” who became sick and was taken inside for the winter. In the case of the tortoise, the goal is to gain time for the reptile’s shell to develop and harden to make the young reptiles safe from predators. Adult tortoises with hardened shells have few predators, but juveniles are extremely vulnerable for the first four or five years of life. a small percentage make it to adulthood,” Hughson said. “It’s all about the predation,” says Debra Hughson, the Preserve’s chief of science and resource stewardship. “The purpose of Head Start is to allow them to survive.” How many tortoises are there in the Preserve? “Nobody knows exactly, but only Once numerous in the Mojave, the desert tortoise began experiencing loss of natural habitat from a variety of sources by the late 1980s: exurban sprawl, overgrazing by livestock, poaching, invasive plants, development of highways and dirt roads, and expanding use of off-road recreational vehicles. The degradation and fragmentation of habitat create barriers for the slowmoving tortoise in its search for food and water and also bring danger from motorists and off-roaders. Eggs of the unborn are sometimes trampled. Also, the lives of many are cut short by an upper-respiratory disease, possibly introduced into the desert by sick pet tortoises that were turned loose by their owners. This, coupled with the late maturity of the tortoise, which can take 18 to 20 years to reach breeding age, makes for long odds in the game of survival in the desert. Tortoise numbers have diminished by as much as 90 percent in some areas of the Mojave, according to Hughson. NPS COLLECTION In August 1989, the California Fish and Game Commission listed the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) as a threatened species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act of 1973. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service followed suit with federal protection in 1991. The Preserve was created in 1994 under the California Desert Protection Act, federal legislation that was intended to protect remaining California desert wild lands. The act called for large-scale management of the Mojave bioregion west of the Colorado River in conjunction with Joshua Tree and Death Valley national parks, as well as the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). continued on page 5 You have chosen a special time to visit us—one of the more than 400 sites within the National Park Service—because we have begun celebrating 100 years of sharing America’s special places and helping Americans to make meaningful connections with nature, history, and culture. The National Park Service was established in 1916 to oversee the administration of these special places. As part of its centennial, the National Park Service is inviting a new generation to discover the special places that belong to us all. We are encouraging new audiences and people not familiar with the National Park Service and public lands to find their park. Many peop

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