"Owachomo Bridge" by NPS photo / Neal Herbert , public domain

Natural Bridges

National Monument - Utah

Natural Bridges National Monument is located about 50 miles (80 km) northwest of the Four Corners boundary of southeast Utah, in the western United States, at the junction of White Canyon and Armstrong Canyon, part of the Colorado River drainage. It features the thirteenth largest natural bridge in the world, carved from the white Permian sandstone of the Cedar Mesa Formation that gives White Canyon its name.

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maps

Official visitor map of Natural Bridges National Monument (NM) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Natural Bridges - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Natural Bridges National Monument (NM) in Utah. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of Jacobs Chair, Piute Pass and Tables of the Sun Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - Jacobs Chair, Piute Pass and Tables of the Sun

Map of Jacobs Chair, Piute Pass and Tables of the Sun Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.

Map of Peavine, Dark and Rig Canyons and Gooseberry Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - Peavine, Dark and Rig Canyons and Gooseberry

Map of Peavine, Dark and Rig Canyons and Gooseberry Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Trails. Published by San Juan County.

Map 8 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County - Travel Plan - Map 8

Map 8 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.

Map 7 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County - Travel Plan - Map 7

Map 7 of the San Juan County Travel Plan in Utah. Published by San Juan County.

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Monticello Ranger District in Manti-La Sal National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Manti-La Sal MVTM - Monticello 2020

Motor Vehicle Travel Map (MVTM) of Monticello Ranger District in Manti-La Sal National Forest (NF). Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Monticello Ranger District in Manti-La Sal National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Manti-La Sal MVUM - Monticello - 2022

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Monticello Ranger District in Manti-La Sal National Forest (NF) in Utah. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Recreation Opportunities at Bears Ears National Monument (NM) in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).Bears Ears - Recreation Opportunities

Map of Recreation Opportunities at Bears Ears National Monument (NM) in Utah. Published by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Map of the San Juan County Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Travel Plan and Trail System. Published by San Juan County.San Juan County OHV - OHV Travel Plan and Trails

Map of the San Juan County Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Travel Plan and Trail System. Published by San Juan County.

https://www.nps.gov/nabr/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_Bridges_National_Monument Natural Bridges National Monument is located about 50 miles (80 km) northwest of the Four Corners boundary of southeast Utah, in the western United States, at the junction of White Canyon and Armstrong Canyon, part of the Colorado River drainage. It features the thirteenth largest natural bridge in the world, carved from the white Permian sandstone of the Cedar Mesa Formation that gives White Canyon its name. Three majestic natural bridges invite you to ponder the power of water in a landscape usually defined by its absence. View them from an overlook, or hit the trails and experience their grandeur from below. Declared a National Monument in 1908, the bridges are named "Kachina," "Owachomo" and "Sipapu" in honor of the ancestral Puebloans who once made this place their home. The entrance to Natural Bridges is at the end of UT 275, which is roughly 35 miles west of Blanding, Utah, on UT 95. Driving time from Blanding is roughly 45 minutes. Natural Bridges Visitor Center The Natural Bridges Visitor Center is typically open daily, 9 am to 4 pm. In winter, the visitor center is closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays and on certain holidays. Exhibits, a video presentation, and a bookstore are available. You can pay your entrance fee at the visitor center. The Natural Bridges Visitor Center is at the end of UT 275, which is roughly 35 miles west of Blanding, Utah, on UT 95. Driving time from Blanding is roughly 45 minutes. Natural Bridges Campground Camp in solitude among the juniper trees at Natural Bridges campground. The campground is conveniently located next to the visitor center off the main park road. Campsites are first-come, first-served and open year-round. Each site has a fire grill, picnic table, and tent pad, but no running water, electricity, or hookups. Standard Site 15.00 Fee per night at a standard Natural Bridges' campground site, all year. Group size is limited to 8 people and 1 vehicle. Senior/Access Rate 7.50 Discounted camping rates with valid Senior or Access passes. Fee per night at a standard Natural Bridges' campground site with valid pass, all year. Group size is limited to 8 people and 1 vehicle. Natural Bridges Campground Campsite featuring a picnic table and fire pit amongst the trees in Natural Bridges. Campsite in the Natural Bridges Campground Dark Skies at Owachomo Bridge a natural bridge at night with the Milky Way arcing overhead Natural Bridges National Monument was designated the world's first International Dark Sky Park in 2007 Sipapu Bridge Sipapu Bridge with a blue sky and clouds overhead Sipapu Bridge is one of the three massive bridges at the monument. Horse Collar Ruin a stone structure below a rock alcove Horsecollar Ruins are located near Sipapu Bridge Hiker at Kachina Bridge a hiker standing below a massive natural bridge Hiking trails link the three natural bridges at the monument. Owachomo Bridge a broad natural bridge with clouds in the sky Owachomo Bridge is one of the three natural bridges at the monument. Desert Varnish Ever wondered what those dark lines were on the rock walls of canyon country? These black, brown, and red streaks are called desert varnish. streaks of black desert varnish on a red rock wall Ephemeral Pools Ephemeral pools are a vital source of water in a parched desert. grasses growing in a ephemeral pool filled with water Celebrating 50 Years of Partnership Canyonlands Natural History Association celebrated its 50th anniversary of partnering with public lands in southeast Utah. Since its founding in 1967, CNHA has donated over $12 million to Southeast Utah Group parks and its other federal partners—the Bureau of Land Management and US Forest Service. Superintendent Kate Cannon hands a plaque to CNHA Executive Director Roxanne Bierman National Park Getaway: Natural Bridges National Monument Natural Bridges National Monument is a place of firsts. In 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt made Natural Bridges the first National Park Service site in Utah. The presidential proclamation states: “a number of natural bridges situated in southeastern Utah, having heights more lofty and spans far greater than any heretofore known to exist, are of the greatest scientific interest.” No one had seen such an impressive example of stream-eroded stone before. Dark sky full of stars above and below a natural land bridge. Monsoon Season Late summer is monsoon season on the Colorado Plateau. Afternoon thunderstorms are common - flash floods and lightning are possible. Learn more about this special time of year and how to plan for it. rainstorm over Canyonlands Arches National Park’s Free-Flowing Waters Visitors to Arches National Park experience natural free-flowing waters and have water to quench their thirst, thanks to an agreement between the National Park Service and the State of Utah. The sun sits just below the horizon behind Delicate Arch. Landbird Monitoring in Northern Colorado Plateau Network Parks, 2018 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2018. Small, bright-orange bird with yellowish underfeathers. Surviving in the Desert In this arid land, plants and animals must adapt to constantly changing water availability. red blooms on cluster of claret cup cactus Veteran Story: William Bouley Bill Bouley served in the US Army for 20 years. Today he continues in public service as a Safety Manager for several parks and monuments in southern Utah. Bill Bouley, in uniform, with a helicopter in the background Wadeable Streams Monitoring at Natural Bridges National Monument, 2010–2018 Riparian areas are oases of life. To evaluate the health of riparian systems, the Northern Colorado Plateau Network monitors physical and biological attributes of wadeable streams. These indicators tell us about “normal” conditions and give park managers early warning of potential problems. Monitoring at Natural Bridges National Monument from 2010 to 2018 revealed how flood events caused changes in the channel, and how plants have responded. A hiker walks past juniper bushes toward a red rock arch. The Colorado Plateau The Colorado Plateau is centered on the four corners area of the Southwest, and includes much of Arizona, Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico. Hazy Fajada Butte, Chaco Culture National Monument NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Natural Bridges National Monument, Utah Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] large natural stone bridge Studying the Fate of Arches Park staff and scientists study geological change in the natural arches of Utah. Monitoring devices, like the crackmeter, measure vibration and expansion in arches that are actively eroding. The data collected could determine potential safety risks in the future. a park ranger looks at a computer with two large arches in the background Gnats In the late spring and early summer, swarms of tiny biting gnats often greet visitors to Utah national parks. These miniscule pests thrive in the scattered pinyon-juniper forests of southeast Utah. Reading Rock Markings If you travel the canyons of the American Southwest, you are sure to see figures carved or painted on rock faces. These include abstractions like spirals, dots and geometric patterns, or more recognizable forms like animals, humans, and handprints. They served to communicate among American Indian tribes throughout the centuries, and they continue to communicate today. depictions of bighorn sheep and riders on horseback pecked into a rock wall Animal-Transmitted Diseases in Southeast Utah Some diseases can be passed from animals to humans. Never approach wildlife and learn other ways to protect yourself from animal-transmitted diseases in Southeast Utah parks. Small brown and tan rodent standing up on hind legs, with soil and green vegetation around it. Biological Soil Crust of Southeast Utah Be careful where you step because the dirt is alive! This bumpy, lumpy, crust black soil is called biological soil crust and is made up of living organisms. bumpy black soil crust with lichen Lichens of Southeast Utah Those bright colors you may see on sandstone and biological soil crust are alive! Lichens grow in every size, shape, and color in Southeast Utah. scaly gray lichen growing on dark soil crust House Rules for Visiting Archeological Sites in Southeast Utah Visiting a Southeast Utah park? These parks contain sacred areas and ancestral homeland of over 30 traditionally associated Native American Tribes. Learn how to be a respectful guest at cultural sites with these house rules. Two people stand and look at a circular tower constructed out of rocks. What We’re Learning and Why it Matters: Long-Term Monitoring on the Northern Colorado Plateau Knowing which key natural resources are found in the national parks, and whether they're stable or changing, helps decisionmakers make sound choices. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network is building that knowledge. After more than ten years of monitoring, we've learned a lot about park ecosystems, how they're changing, and what they may look like in the days to come. Find out what we’ve learned and how it’s being used to help managers plan for the future. Man stands in a stream, looking down at a handheld gauge. Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2019 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2019. Bald eagle Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Permian Period—298.9 to 251.9 MYA The massive cliffs of El Capitan in Guadalupe Mountains National Park represent a Permian-age reef along the supercontinent Pangaea. The uppermost rocks of Grand Canyon National Park are also Permian. flat-top mountain Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Round-up Donations Add Up to Big Support If you tell our bookstore partner to "keep the change," those pennies lead to big support for park programs. A clerk ringing up a customer at Arches' bookstore Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2020 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2020. Small beige bird with black beak and feet, brown back. Climate Smart Conservation Planning for the National Parks In response to climate change, park managers are having to rethink how they plan for the future. Climate Smart Conservation is a process that can help managers achieve goals in the face of coming changes. Under this framework, scientists and managers use their collective knowledge to anticipate problems and be proactive, rather than reactive. Pika with a mouthful of grass Monitoring From Space: Using Satellite Imagery to Measure Landscape Conditions on the Ground Scientists from the Northern Colorado Plateau Network travel thousands of miles each year to collect data on plants, soils, and water across network parks. But it would be impossible to cover every square inch of the Northern Colorado Plateau with boots on the ground. Instead, we simultaneously monitor the parks with boots in space—satellite data that provide information at a much broader scale. Satellite and Earth in space Responding to Climate Change in the Southeast Utah Parks This paper describes how the Southeast Utah Group of parks is responding to climate change. The paper summarizes expected future climate conditions compared with a 20th Century baseline. It describes the foundation of our work within the Climate Smart Conservation framework adopted at our initial workshop in December 2018. A photograph of a grassland, containing some shrubs. Localized Drought Impacts on Northern Colorado Plateau Landbirds Birds of the desert southwest, a climate-change hotspot, are among the most vulnerable groups in the US. To help park managers plan for those changes, scientists evaluated the influence of water deficit on landbird communities at 11 national parks in Utah and Colorado. The results will help land managers to focus conservation efforts on places where certain species are most vulnerable to projected climate changes. A man wearing a clipboard looks through binoculars at dawn in field of sagebrush Series: Intermountain Park Science 2021 Integrating Research and Resource Management in Intermountain National Parks Group of National Park Service staff and volunteers standing in front of a desert canyon. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Water Resources on the Colorado Plateau Describes the origin, uses, threats to, and conservation of water on the Colorado Plateau. Dark green body of water winding through red rock formations with brilliant sun overhead. But How Do They Know? Sedimentary Geology of Natural Bridges How do they know what rocks are made of, or what story they tell? We're diving into the world of sedimentary geology and how geologists discovered the story of the stones in Natural Bridges National Monument. a stone bridge spans a canyon Landbird Population Trends in the Northern Colorado Plateau Network, 2021 Because birds can be sensitive to habitat change, they are good indicators of ecosystem integrity. The Northern Colorado Plateau Network partners with the University of Delaware to assess breeding-bird species trends in three different habitats: low-elevation riparian, pinyon-juniper, and sage shrubland. Find out which species were increasing and declining at network parks as of 2021. Small dove with black spots on back of wings, long tail, and brownish-gray body.

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