"Thomas Jefferson Memorial" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

National Mall and Memorial Parks

undefined - District of Columbia

National Mall and Memorial Parks is an administrative unit of the National Park Service encompassing many national memorials and other areas in Washington, D.C.

maps

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Mall and Memorial Parks - National Heritage Areas

Official visitor map of National Mall and Memorial Parks in Washington D.C. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).George Washington - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of George Washington Memorial Parkway (MEMPKWY) in Virginia and District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Chesapeake & Ohio Canal - Visitor Map

Official Visitor Map of Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park (NHP) in Washington D.C., Maryland and West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Rock Creek Park - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Rock Creek Park in District of Columbia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/nama https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Mall_and_Memorial_Parks National Mall and Memorial Parks is an administrative unit of the National Park Service encompassing many national memorials and other areas in Washington, D.C. This is where the nation comes to remember and where history is made. As “America’s Front Yard,” the National Mall and Memorial Parks is home to many of our country’s most iconic memorials telling the story of people and events that shaped us as a nation. Each year, millions of people come to recreate, commemorate presidential legacies, honor our veterans, and make their voices heard. National Mall and Memorial Parks preserves more than one thousand acres of federal parkland in Washington, DC, including: the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Korean War Veterans Memorial, DC War Memorial, and East and West Potomac Parks; Pennsylvania Avenue National Historic Site, Ford's Theatre National Historic Site. National Mall West Aerial of the west side of National Mall and Memorial Parks Honoring our Nation National Mall Center Aerial View of the Washington Monument and sites north From Founding Father to Presidents Park National Mall East Aerial View of the East End of the National Mall From Founding Father to Capitol National Mall view from Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool Reflection on Washington Monument along pool with US Capitol in background Looking East from the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool with Washington Monument and US Capitol in view National Mall Aerial View from Lincoln Memorial Aerial view from West to East showing Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument and US Capitol A 2 mile stretch view of the National Mall from Lincoln Memorial to US Capitol 2019 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service Celebrate 50 years of the NPS Volunteer-in-Parks Program, and learn about the contributions of the volunteer recipients of the 2019 George and Helen Hartzog Awards for Outstanding Volunteer Service, for work performed in fiscal year 2019. a volunteer wearing a red life vest walks towards you with a smile, lifting a canoe paddle National Mall and Memorial Parks - 2018 Partnership Report Our generous partners and volunteers provided more than $34 million in philanthropic contributions in 2018 helping us fund preservation projects, programs, commemorations, and celebrations. Aerial photo of the Washington Monument and Reflecting Pool New Beginnings: Cherry Blossoms and Helen Taft's Landscape Diplomacy Each spring, the Tidal Basin in Washington, D.C. is alive with crowds of visitors who come to see the iconic monuments framed by delicate pink and white cherry blossoms. The trees that line the walkways were a gift from the citizens of Japan in 1912, an act of landscape diplomacy and design initiated by First Lady Helen Taft. The relationship symbolized by these cherry trees continues to be recognized through both formal ceremonies and the admiration of visitors. Cherry blossoms frame a view of the Washington Monument from across the water Forward Into Light! “Forward into Light” was a popular rallying cry for the women’s suffrage movement. Suffragists carried banners at marches and demonstrations emblazoned with a compelling verse: “Forward out of error / Leave behind the night. / Forward through the darkness, / Forward into light!” From BEPA, poster of Inez Milholland on a white horse carrying a Forward Into Light banner Methodist Episcopal Church Sunday School Children (260' level) Methodist Episcopal Church NY City Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Methodist Episcopal Church NY City Commemorative Stone R. Norris and Son Locomotive Works (270' level) R. Norris and Son Locomotive Works Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument R. Norris and Son Locomotive Works Commemorative Stone Ladies of Lowell (250' level) Ladies of Lowell Massachusetts Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Ladies of Lowell Massachusetts Commemorative Stone IOOF Athenian Lodge 268 Troy New York (160' level) IOOF Athenian Lodge of Troy New York Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Athenian Lodge of Troy New York Commemorative Stone Corporation of the City of Philadelphia (180' level) Corportation of the City of Philadelphia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Corportation of the City of Philadelphia Commemorative Stone IOOF City and County of Philadelphia (180' level) IOOF City and County of Philadelphia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF City and County of Philadelphia Commemorative Stone Charlestown Massachusetts (170' level) Charlestown Massachusetts Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Charlestown Massachusetts Commemorative Stone Sons of Temperance Grand Division of North Carolina (70' level) Sons of Temperance Grand Division of North Carolina Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Sons of Temperance Grand Division of North Carolina Commemorative Stone Sons of Temperance Grand Division of Virginia (70' level) Sons of Temperance Virginia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Sons of Temperance Virginia Commemorative Stone State of Massachusetts (70' level) State of Massachusetts Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Massachusetts Commemorative Stone State of Mississippi (90' level) State of Mississippi Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Mississippi Commemorative Stone State of Connecticut (70' level) State of Connecticut Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Connecticut Commemorative Stone State of Maryland (80' level) State of Maryland Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Maryland Commemorative Stone State of Florida (60' level) State of Florida Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Florida Commemorative Stone George Waterson Washington National Monument Society (30' level) George Watterson Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument George Watterson Commemorative Stone Washington Light Infantry (50' level) Washington Light Infantry Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Washington Light Infantry Commemorative Stone Franklin Fire Company (30' level) Franklin Fire Company Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Franklin Fire Company Commemorative Stone Columbia Typographical Society (40' level) Columbia Typographical Society Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Columbia Typographical Society German Benevolent Society (40' level) German Benevolent Society Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument German Benevolent Society Commemorative Stone Nashville Tennessee (40' level) Nashville Tennessee Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Nashville Tennessee Little Falls Quarry (30' level) Little Falls Quarry Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Little Falls Quarry Commemorative Stone 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2011 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards 2008 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2008 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Weather Data Analysis for the National Mall and Memorial Park Complete historical weather records provide a unique opportunity to evaluate changing weather patterns. At the National Mall and Memorial Parks (Mall) recorded weather records indicate weather changes following an urban pattern: increased average temperatures, night-time low temperatures, day-time high temperatures, and precipitation. Aerial view of the Lincoln memorial. Jefferson Memorial Dedication Drew Dignitaries, Declaration The dedication of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial on April 13, 1943 drew President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's, a wide array of dignitaries, and a special exhibit featuring Jefferson's Declaration of Independence. Declaration of Independence at base of Thomas Jefferson statue in the Jefferson Memorial Cherry Trees: A First Lady's Legacy When the Tidal Basin is abloom with its annual display of pink and white petals, we take time to remember the presidential first ladies. Helen Taft was the first presidential spouse to observe the traditional Japanese custom of “hanami” or flower watching in the United States. Subsequent first ladies have continued the tradition of DC’s “spring rite” as honorary chairs of the Cherry Blossom Festival. Photo of first lady Helen Taft. First Lady of Potomac Park: Nellie Taft Helen "Nellie" Herron Taft's dream of becoming First Lady propelled her husband William Howard Taft into running for the presidency. For her part, she was a lady of "firsts," and was among the First Ladies to transform the role into the significant one it is today. Her legacy is still evident in parts of the National Mall. Photo of William Taft and first lady Helen "Nellie" Taft. The Birds, the Bees, and the Flowering Cherry Trees What kinds of birds have you seen on the National Mall? Cherry trees give birds a place to call home. They provide cover from the wind, shade from the sun, and food. The relationship becomes symbiotic when birds eat insects that could harm the trees. Bird's nest in a blossoming cherry tree. TLC for the Mall’s Elm Trees Many people enjoy the shade and beauty of the American elm trees that line the National Mall. Yet high visitation means the trees are stressed by soil compaction and chronic wear and tear. So the park is studying ways to help the elms survive and thrive. Looking up into the canopy of a large leafy tree. Lichens and Air Quality Lichens are durable enough to grow on tree bark and bare rock, yet are sensitive to pollution and air quality. One species in particular was used to track levels of air-borne lead over a 100 year period! Pale green lichen growing on rock. National Park Getaway: National Mall & Memorial Parks National Mall and Memorial Parks is a diverse national park with distinctive sites that excite and enchant visitors while they learn the history of our nation. Begin your journey through “America’s Front Yard,” home to some of the nation's more iconic memorials located in the heart of the nation's capital. Cherry blossoms framing the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in the distance NPS Structural Fire Program Highlights 2014 Intern Accomplishments First Regiment of Light Infantry Boston (280' level) 1st Regiment of Light Infantry, Boston Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument 1st Regiment of Light Infantry, Boston Commemorative Stone Jefferson Society of the University of Virginia (270' level) Jefferson Society of the Univ of Virginia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Jefferson Society of the Univ of Virginia Commemorative Stone General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church (240' level) General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church Commemorative Stone Fire Department of Philadelphia (250' level) Fire Department Philadelphia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Fire Department Philadelphia Commemorative Stone IORM Tuscarora Tribe No 5 (240' level) IORM Tuscarora Tribe No. 5 Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IORM Tuscarora Tribe No. 5 Commemorative Stone Jefferson Medical College (280' level) Jefferson Medical College Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Jefferson Medical College Commemorative Stone Honesdale Pennsylvania (280' level) Honesdale Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Honesdale Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone Hibernian Society (280' level) Hibernian Society Baltimore Commemorative Stone Hibernian Society Baltimore Commemorative Stone Home of Stark (270' level) Home of Stark Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Home of Stark Commemorative Stone State of Utah (220' level) State of Utah Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Utah Commemorative Stone Templars of Honor and Temperance, Supreme Council (200' level) Templars of Honor and Temperance, Supreme Council Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Templars of Honor and Temperance, Supreme Council Commemorative Stone United American Mechanics (240' level) United Mechanics of Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument United Mechanics of Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone State of Tennessee (230' level) State of Tennessee Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Tennessee Commemorative Stone Free Swiss Confederation (190' level) Free Swiss Confederation Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Free Swiss Confederation Commemorative Stone State of Oregon (220' level) State of Oregon Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Oregon Commemorative Stone Wyoming Territory (220' level) Wyoming Territory Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Wyoming Territory Commemorative Stone American Institute of the City of New York (130' level) American Institute of the City of New York Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument American Institute of the City of New York Commemorative Stone Company I, 4th Regiment Infantry (140' level) Company I 4th Regiment Infantry Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Company I 4th Regiment Infantry Commemorative Stone Corporation of the City of New York (130' level) Corporation of the City of New York Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Corporation of the City of New York Commemorative Stone Engineers, Second Division, Virginia (140' level) 2nd Division Engineers Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument 2nd Division Engineers Commemorative Stone City of Baltimore Maryland (140' level) City of Baltimore Maryland Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument City of Baltimore Maryland Commemorative Stone Durham, New Hampshire (130' level) Durham New Hampshire Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Durham New Hampshire Commemorative Stone Fort Greene (140' level) Fort Greene Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Fort Greene Commemorative Stone Sons of Temperance Rhode Island (120' level) S of T Rhode Island Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument S of T Rhode Island Commemorative Stone Roxbury Massachusetts (120' level) City of Roxbury Massachusetts Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument City of Roxbury Massachusetts Commemorative Stone Peter Force (110' level) Peter Force Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Peter Force Commemorative Stone Chairman of the Building Committee (70.5' level) Chairman of the Building Committee Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Chairman of the Building Committee Commemorative Stone City of Washington (80' level) City of Washington Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument City of Washington Commemorative Stone David Farragut Walk north of the White House along Connecticut Avenue and you will come across a fairly unassuming statue of a man looking out over the horizon. This is America’s first Admiral, David Farragut. In a lifetime of service beginning at the age of nine, David Farragut represented American ideals of bravery, loyalty and honor. Man stands on a ship. He is wearing a naval uniform with dark coat and white pants. 7/4- Seven Stories for the Ages There are certain dates that people circle on their calendar. Year to year, these dates may change for some, with the incidental importance one day may hold to the next. Vacations, doctor’s appointments, dates, family reunions, etc. are all important. They affect us all differently, at varied stages of our lives. One date, however, on the calendar of most Americans, is generally highlighted. The fourth day of July is significant for all of us. A sketch of Stephen Foster appears on a postage stamp. James Garfield: The Great "What If" President Of the four assassinated presidents, James Garfield is the least recognized. Kennedy’s administration was televised. McKinley was in his second term following the Spanish-American War. And Lincoln was, well, you know... Lincoln? But Garfield falls into that hazy, post-Reconstruction period where nothing much seems to be going on; no war, no global economic or social crisis, no real era-identifying issue. James A. Garfield in profile. He is facing away from the camera to the right. Restoring the National Mall Turf The National Mall, America's front lawn, greets over 30 million visitors each year. From 2010 to 2016, National Park Service staff oversaw the restoration of the National Mall turf, turning the 18 acre green expanse into a point of pride for all the nation. dirt and grass in front of the washington monument Restoration of George Mason Memorial The National Park Service and the Trust for the National Mall have begun a restoration of the George Mason Memorial, located in East Potomac Park near the Thomas Jefferson Memorial. The yearlong project will include reconstruction of the central fountain, adding perennial plantings throughout the site and a thorough touch-up to the George Mason statue, trellis, and inscriptions. Construction Begins Restoring the George Mason Memorial 2010 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Seven rangers were awarded with a national or regional 2010 Freeman Tilden Award for excellence in interpretation. Learn more about their exciting and innovative projects. Portrait of John Kirkpatrick Veteran Story: James Pierce James Pierce at the American Veterans Disabled for Life Memorial NPS staff member in front of mural of wounded soldiers Sabbath School Children, Methodist E. Church (260' level) Sabbath School Children, Methodist E Church Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Sabbath School Children, Methodist E Church Commemorative Stone Sons of New England in Canada (260' level) Sons of New England in Canada Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Sons of New England in Canada Commemorative Stone State of North Dakota (350' level) State of North Dakota Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of North Dakota Commemorative Stone State of New Mexico (330' level) State of New Mexico Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of New Mexico Commemorative Stone State of Hawaii (360' level) State of Hawaii Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Hawaii Commemorative Stone State of Alaska (450' level) State of Alaska Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Alaska Commemorative Stone State of Idaho (400' level) State of Idaho Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Idaho Commemorative Stone State of Colorado (290' level) State of Colorado Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Colorado Commemorative Stone Ryukyu Stone (310' level) Ryukyu Stone Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Ryukyu Stone Commemorative Stone Association of the Oldest Inhabitants (240' level) Assoc of Oldest Inhabitants Washington DC Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Assoc of Oldest Inhabitants Washington DC Commemorative Stone IOOF Grand Lodge of Kentucky (230' level) IOOF Grand Lodge of Kentucky Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Grand Lodge of Kentucky Commemorative Stone Hawkins County Tennessee (230' level) Hawkins County Tennesse Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Hawkins County Tennesse Commemorative Stone Georgia Convention (230' level) Georgia Convention Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Georgia Convention Commemorative Stone Braddocks Field (240' level) Braddocks Field Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Braddocks Field Commemorative Stone Cherokee Nation (220' level) Cherokee Nation Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Cherokee Nation Commemorative Stone Deseret (220' level) Deseret Commemorative Stone Deseret Commemorative Stone Sons of Temperance Pennsylvania (180' level) Sons of Temperance Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Sons of Temperance Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone State of New York (160' level) State of New York Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of New York Commemorative Stone State of Pennsylvania (180' level) State of Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone State of Vermont (170' level) State of Vermont Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Vermont Commemorative Stone Salem Massachusetts (170' level) Salem Massachusetts Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Salem Massachusetts Commemorative Stone Turkey (190' level) Country of Turkey Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Country of Turkey Commemorative Stone Siam (190' level) Country of Siam Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Country of Siam Commemorative Stone Masons, Patmos Lodge No 70 Ellicotts Mills, Maryland (120' level) Masons, Patmos Lodge Masons Ellicott City Maryland Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Patmos Lodge Masons Ellicott City Maryland Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Ohio (110' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Ohio Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Ohio Commemorative Stone IOOF Germantown Pennsylvania (120' level) IOOF Germantown Pennsylvania within the Washington Monument IOOF Germantown Pennsylvania American Whig Society (130' level) American Whig Society Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument American Whig Society Commemorative Stone Frederick Maryland (120' level) City of Frederick Maryland Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument City of Frederick Maryland Commemorative Stone IOOF Massachusetts (130' level) IOOF Massachusetts Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Massachusetts Commemorative Stone State of Louisiana (40' level) State of Louisiana Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Louisiana Commemorative Stone State of Delaware (30' level) State of Delaware Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Delaware Commemorative Stone State of Arkansas (30' level) State of Arkansas Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Arkansas Commemorative Stone National Greys (30' level) National Greys Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument National Greys Commemorative Stone State of Maine (30' level) Commemorative Stone from State of Maine within the Washington Monument. State of Maine Commemorative Stone State of Alabama (40' level) State of Alabama Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Alabama Commemorative Stone State of Arizona (320' level) Arizona's commemorative stone didn't start out as a stone at all - 200 million years ago! Three pieces of petrified wood engraved with "Arizona." D-Day 75th Anniversary The beaches are now quiet in Normandy, France but seventy-five years ago soldiers heard the shriek of artillery, the crack of gunfire, and the cries of the wounded. On that day, June 6, 1944, the outcome of World War II hung in the balance. The seemingly invincible Nazis had occupied the Europe for the past five years. When the day closed, the "beginning of the end," as British Prime Minister Winston Churchill described the invasion, had started. Black and white photo of the D-Day invasion. Golf Course as Classroom: University of Pennsylvania at East Potomac Park In 2016, a team from the University of Pennsylvania's program in historic preservation visited East Potomac Park Golf Course in Washington, DC. Through research and fieldwork, they explored the challenges of documenting and preserving an ever-changing landscape. The course, opened in 1920, is associated with the "Golden Age of Golf." It is also linked to civil rights history in the city; in 1941, three African American golfers played a round to protest segregation. A University of Pennsylvania student uses a golf cart on a trail through the course. Eliza Scidmore’s Faithful Pursuit Of a Dream In 1885, 29-year old Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore returned to the United States following her first visit to Japan, where her brother George worked for the US Consular Service. While there, she developed a great appreciation for the Japanese people, culture, and the beauty of the Japanese flowering cherry trees. She brought back with her a desire to introduce the beauty of Japanese cherry blossoms to the American people. Black and White photo of woman's head and shoulders Friendship Mural Each year at the National Cherry Blossom Festival Welcome Area, the National Park Service displays a Japanese-American “Friendship Mural.” This activity invites all children to participate by leaving a message or drawing a picture celebrating the diversity of cultures that is then shared with children of Japan as a gift of friendship. Children draw on the Friendship Mural at the Tidal Basin Welcome Area of the festival Lincoln Memorial Myths Almost since its completion in 1922 the memorial to Abraham Lincoln has conjured up several myths associated with its architectural details. While there are symbolic representations, some suggested symbols are pure myth. "Abraham Lincoln" by Daniel Chester French Addisonian Literary Society (280' level) Addisonian Literary Society Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Addisonian Literary Society Commemorative Stone American Medical Association (240' level) American Medical Association Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument American Medical Association Commemorative Stone A Roma Americae (Pope Stone) (340' level) A Roma Americae Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument A Roma Americae Commemorative Stone Baltimore Public Schools (260' level) Public Schools Baltimore Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Public Schools Baltimore Commemorative Stone Alexandrian Library (270' level) Alexandria Library Egypt Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Alexandria Library Egypt Commemorative Stone Battle Ground, Long Island (240' level) Battle ground, Long Island Commemorative Stone Battle ground, Long Island Commemorative Stone Alexandria Virginia (280' level) Alexandria Va Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Alexandria Va Commemorative Stone Carthago (380' level) Carthago Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Carthago Commemorative Stone Teachers of the Buffalo Public Schools (250' level) Teachers of Buffalo Public Schools Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Teachers of Buffalo Public Schools Commemorative Stone State of South Dakota (300' level) State of South Dakota Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of South Dakota Commemorative Stone Stockton California (250' level) Citizens of Stockton/San Joaquin California Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Citizens of Stockton/San Joaquin California Commemorative Stone Two Disciples of Daguerre (280' level) Two Disiples of Daguerre Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Two Disiples of Daguerre Commemorative Stone Thalian Association (250' level) Thalian Assoc, North Carolina Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Thalian Assoc, North Carolina Commemorative Stone State of Washington (310' level) State of Washington Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Washington Commemorative Stone Top of the Capitol (330' level) Top of Statue on Capitol Stone within the Washington Monument Top of Statue on Capitol Stone State of Texas (290' level) State of Texas Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Texas Commemorative Stone State of Oklahoma (290' level) State of Oklahoma Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Oklahoma Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Mississippi (210' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Mississippi Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Mississippi Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Florida (230' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Florida Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Florida Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Virginia (200' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Virginia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Virginia Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Arkansas (210' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Arkansas Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Arkansas Commemorative Stone IOOF Grand Lodge of Maryland (200' level) IOOF Grand Lodge of Maryland Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Grand Lodge of Maryland Commemorative Stone IOOF Grand Lodge of the U.S. (200' level) IOOF Grand Lodge of the US Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Grand Lodge of the US Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Iowa (210' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Iowa Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Iowa Commemorative Stone IOOF Grand Lodge of Mississippi (210' level) IOOF Grand Lodge of Mississippi Commemorative Stone IOOF Grand Lodge of Mississippi Commemorative Stone Japan (220' level) Country of Japan Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Country of Japan Commemorative Stone Masons, Lafayette Lodge No 64 New York (160' level) Masons, Lafayette Lodge No 64 New York Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Lafayette Lodge No 64 New York Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania (180' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone Masons, Washington Lodge Roxbury (170' level) Masons, Washington Lodge of F & A.M. Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Washington Lodge of F & A.M. Commemorative Stone Island of Paros and Naxos (190' level) Island of Paros and Naxos Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Island of Paros and Naxos Commemorative Stone New Bedford Massachusetts (170' level) New Bedford Mass Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument New Bedford Mass Commemorative Stone Newark New Jersey (160' level) Newark New Jersey Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Newark New Jersey Commemorative Stone IOOF Ohio (90' level) IOOF Ohio Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Ohio Commemorative Stone Sons of Temperance Grand Division of Connecticut (130' level) Sons of Temperance Grand Division of Connecticut Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Sons of Temperance Grand Division of Connecticut Commemorative Stone Masons, Washington Lodge No 21 (130' level) Washington Lodge No 2 of the City of New York Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Washington Lodge No 2 of the City of New York Commemorative Stone Masterson & Smith, New York (140' level) New York (masterton and smith) Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument New York (masterton and smith) Commemorative Stone Otters Summit Virginia (140' level) Otters Summit Virginia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Otters Summit Virginia Commemorative Stone Warren, Rhode Island (160' level) Warren Rhode Island Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Warren Rhode Island Commemorative Stone Union Society (130' level) Union Society North Carolina Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Union Society North Carolina Commemorative Stone Oakland College (130' level) Oakland College Mississippi Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Oakland College Mississippi Commemorative Stone State of North Carolina (100' level) State of North Carolina Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of North Carolina Commemorative Stone State of Rhode Island (100' level) State of Rhode Island Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Rhode Island Commemorative Stone State of New Jersey (70' level) State of New Jersey Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of New Jersey Commemorative Stone State of Wisconsin (100' level) State of Wisconsin Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Wisconsin Commemorative Stone State of Virginia (80' level) State of Virginia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Virginia Commemorative Stone State of Missouri (90' level) State of Missouri Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Missouri Commemorative Stone State of Ohio (90' level) State of Ohio Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Ohio Commemorative Stone Lincoln Memorial Pathway Repair The National Park Service is improving exterior accessibility at the Lincoln Memorial by replacing pathways that lead visitors to the exhibits, restrooms and elevator of the memorial. Pathways at Lincoln Memorial under construction Benjamin Banneker Park Access Improvements The National Park Service in collaboration with the District of Columbia Department of Transportation and HoffmanMadison Waterfront is making pedestrian and bicycle access improvements at Benjamin Banneker Park, located near L'Enfant Plaza in Southwest. Rendering of pedestrian improvements at Banneker Park The 1932 Bonus Army Bonus Army marching down Constitution Ave. Group of men belonging to the Bonus Amrny marching down a long tree lined street. National Capital Region Energy Savings Performance Contract The National Park Service is investing $29 million in 81 individual energy efficiency and water conservation projects at national parks throughout the greater Washington region. Cherry Blossoms at the National Mall 2014 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Introducing the national and regional recipients of the 2014 Freeman Tilden Awards, given in recognition of new and innovative programs in interpretation. Two rangers holding a whale skull 2016 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients In 2016, six rangers were awarded a national or regional Freeman Tilden Award for excellence in interpretation. Learn more about their amazing programs! Lynette Weber Cistern for New Turf on the Mall A 250,000-gallon underground cistern to capture rainwater for irrigation is installed on the National Mall Cistern in place ready to be buried underneath the National Mall Pershing Park John J. Pershing devoted his life to serving his country and remains most deserving of his memorial along America's Main Street. Pershing led American forces to victory in World War I. He resisted calls to distribute American forces among Allied units, preferring to preserve the fighting integrity of American units. The A.E.F.s bravery remains immortalized here upon engraved granite panels as an enduring testimony of the American spirit to later generations. Pershing Statue 'Temporary' War Department Buildings Where visitors now stroll through memorials and green spaces, a huge collection of temporary office buildings once stood. An office building with parked cars in front of it. IOOF Eureka Lodge 177 New York (160' level) IOOF Eureka Lodge 177 City of New York Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Eureka Lodge 177 City of New York Commemorative Stone Association of Journeymen Stoncutters (40' level) Association of Journeymen Stonecutters Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Association of Journeymen Stonecutters State of West Virginia (200' level) State of West Virginia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of West Virginia Commemorative Stone Masons, St Johns Lodge No 36 (200' level) Masons, St. Johns Lodge Richmond VA Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, St. Johns Lodge Richmond VA Commemorative Stone Richmond Virginia (200' level) City of Richmond VA Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument City of Richmond VA Commemorative Stone Bostonia Condita (170' level) Bostonia Condita Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Bostonia Condita Commemorative Stone Brazil (190' level) Country of Brazil Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Country of Brazil Commemorative Stone Greece (190' level) Country of Greece Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Country of Greece Commemorative Stone Bremen (190' level) Country of Bremen Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Country of Bremen Commemorative Stone Masons, Mount Lebanon Lodge No 226 (130' level) Masons, Mount Lebannon Lodge No 226 Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Mount Lebannon Lodge No 226 Commemorative Stone Hitners Quarry Pennsylvania (140' level) Hitners Quarry, Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Hitners Quarry, Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Alabama (140' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Alabama Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Alabama Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Illinois (140' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Illinois Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Illinois Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Maryland (130' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Maryland Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Maryland Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Georgia (140' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Georgia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Georgia Commemorative Stone Independent Order of United Brothers (100' level) Independent Order of United Brothers, Maryland Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Independent Order of United Brothers, Maryland Commemorative Stone IOOF Grand Lodge of New Jersey (60' level) IOOF Grand Lodge of New Jersey Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Grand Lodge of New Jersey Commemorative Stone Invincible Fire Compancy No 5 (80' level) Invincible Fire Company No 5 Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Invincible Fire Company No 5 Commemorative Stone IOOF Grand Lodge of Indiana (80' level) IOOF Grand Lodge of Indiana Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Grand Lodge of Indiana Commemorative Stone Home of Knox (100' level) Home of Knox Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Home of Knox Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of the District of Columbia (50' level) Grand Lodge of Masons, District of Columbia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Grand Lodge of Masons, District of Columbia Commemorative Stone State of South Carolina (60' level) State of South Carolina Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of South Carolina Commemorative Stone State of New Hampshire (60' level) State of New Hampshire Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of New Hampshire Commemorative Stone State of Indiana (50' level) State of Indiana Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Indiana Commemorative Stone State of Illinois (50' level) State of Illinois Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Illinois Commemorative Stone State of Georgia (50' level) State of Georgia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Georgia Commemorative Stone Petersen House Fire Suppression System The Petersen House (House Where Lincoln Died) will be closed for preservation work starting on Monday, December 25, 2017 and lasting until June of 2018. The work will include replacing the existing fire suppression system, updating historic furnishings, and general preservation and maintenance work on the historic structure. Exterior view of Petersen House (House Where Lincoln Died) Jefferson Memorial Restoration The National Park Service has begun a 15-month project to restore the roofs, repair the stone, and clean the marble at the Thomas Jefferson Memorial. The memorial will remain open for the duration of the project, although some areas will be inaccessible. Jefferson Memorial with roof sections labeled Roof Replacement and Masonry Repair at Lincoln Memorial The National Park Service is replacing the roofs and repairing cracked marble at the Lincoln Memorial. The memorial will remain open for the duration of the eight-month project, though some areas will be inaccessible Damaged roof tiles at the Lincoln Memorial Arlington Memorial Bridge Rehabilitation A brief project overview of the repair and reconstruction of Arlington Memorial Bridge. The condition of Arlington Memorial Bridge is degrading quickly. The Memorial Bridge has reached the end of its design life and requires extensive rehabilitation, to include full replacement of its center span. Corrective measures are needed now to keep the structure open to the public until the rehabilitation can be performed. Arlington Memorial Bridge General John J. Pershing General John J. “Black Jack” Pershing A man dressed in military service uniform Waterline Upgrade in West Potomac Park In January 2018 the National Park Service will begin a project to improve the aging and under-sized water distribution system in West Potomac Park. The project will replace several miles of water piping, backflow preventers, and fire hydrants on the west end of the National Mall, from the Washington Monument grounds to the Lincoln Memorial, and through West Potomac Park between the Jefferson Memorial and the Lincoln Memorial. End of new waterpipe sticking out of ground Washington Monument Elevator Modernization The Washington Monument elevator is being modernized to increase long term reliability and safety. Additionally, a permanent screening facility is being built to enhance the safety and security of the monument and our visitors. Rendering of Washington Monument screening facility Turf Management Specialist Michael Stachowicz is the Turf Management Specialist at National Mall and Memorial Parks (NAMA). Michael managed the 2010-2016 rebuilding of the Turf on the National Mall, the largest turf rehabilitation project ever undertaken by the National Park Service (NPS). headshot of Michael Stachowicz wearing ball cap and uniform Tidal Basin, Washington, DC The Tidal Basin is part of West Potomac Park in Washington, DC. The Jefferson Memorial, Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, the FDR Memorial, the George Mason Memorial, the John Paul Jones Memorial, the Floral Library, the Japanese Pagoda, and the Japanese Lantern and site of the First Cherry Tree Planting all surround the Tidal Basin. It is the location most associated with Washington's Cherry Blossom Festival that takes place each spring. Aerial view of the Tidal Basin. Go green for the National Park Service’s birthday! We're adding energy- and water-saving improvements to save money! How can you do the same in your home? National Mall and Memorial Parks Yearly Savings 50.9 M gallons of water, $1 M, 2.7M kwh. Sustainability in Action: Reducing the National Mall’s Carbon Footprint Engine Companies, Hose Companies, Hook and Ladder Companies (250' level) Engine/Hose/Hook and Ladder Companies (first stone) Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Engine/Hose/Hook and Ladder Companies Commemorative Stone Cincinnati Independent Fire Engine and Hose Company (260' level) Cincinnati Independent Fire Engine and Hose Co. Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Cincinnati Independent Fire Engine and Hose Co. Commemorative Stone Engine Companies and House Companies (second stone) (250' level) Engine/Hose Companies (second stone) Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Engine/Hose Companies (second stone) Commemorative Stone Citizens of the United States in Foo Chow Foo (250' level) Citizens of US living in China Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Citizens of US living in China Commemorative Stone Continental Guard of New Orleans (270' level) Continental Guard of New Orleans Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Continental Guard of New Orleans Commemorative Stone Fire Department of New York City (260' level) Fire Department NY City Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Fire Department NY City Commemorative Stone Dramatic Profession of America (280' level) Dramatic Profession Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Dramatic Profession Commemorative Stone Cliosophic Society (270' level) Cliosophic Society New Jersey Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Cliosophic Society New Jersey Commemorative Stone Cincinnati Commercial (250' level) Cincinnati Commercial Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Cincinnati Commercial Commemorative Stone Young Mens Mercantile Library Association (250' level) Young Men's Mercantile Library Assoc Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Young Men's Mercantile Library Assoc Commemorative Stone American Mission Ningpo China (220' level) American Mission, Ningpo China Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument American Mission, Ningpo China Commemorative Stone Washington Erina Guard (260' level) Washington Erina Guard Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Washington Erina Guard Commemorative Stone Sons of Temperance Grand Division of Illinois (210' level) S of T Grand Division of Illinois Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument S of T Grand Division of Illinois Commemorative Stone Sons of Temperance Grand Division of Ohio (210' level) S of T Grand Division of Ohio Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument S of T Grand Division of Ohio Commemorative Stone State of Minnesota (220' level) State of Minnesota Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Minnesota Commemorative Stone State of Kentucky (230' level) State of Kentucky Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Kentucky Commemorative Stone State of Nebraska (220' level) State of Nebraska Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Nebraska Commemorative Stone State of Montana (220' level) State of Montana Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Montana Commemorative Stone State of Nevada (220' level) State of Nevada Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Nevada Commemorative Stone State of Michigan (210' level) State of Michigan Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Michigan Commemorative Stone State of Kansas (210' level) State of Kansas Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Kansas Commemorative Stone Alumni of Washington College (130' level) Alumni of Washington College Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Alumni of Washington College Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of New York State (110' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of New York Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of New York Commemorative Stone Postmasters and Assistant Postmasters (110' level) Postmasters and Asst. Postmasters of Indiana Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Postmasters and Asst. Postmasters of Indiana Commemorative Stone Masons, Grand Lodge of Kentucky (110' level) Masons, Grand Lodge of Kentucky Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Masons, Grand Lodge of Kentucky Commemorative Stone State of Iowa (110' level) State of Iowa Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument State of Iowa Commemorative Stone IOOF Grand Lodge of Virginia (100' level) IOOF Grand Lodge of Virginia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IOOF Grand Lodge of Virginia Commemorative Stone IORM Anacostia Tribe No 3 (60' level) IORM Anacostia Tribe No 3 Washington Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument IORM Anacostia Tribe No 3 Washington Commemorative Stone Little Rock Arkansas (90' level) Little Rock Arkansas Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Little Rock Arkansas Commemorative Stone Maryland Pilgrims Association (80' level) Maryland Pilgrims Association Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Maryland Pilgrims Association Commemorative Stone Mechanics of Raleigh (90' level) Mechanics of Raleigh Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Mechanics of Raleigh Commemorative Stone Ancient York Masons, Washington Naval Lodge (50' level) Ancient York Masons, Washington Naval Lodge 4 Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Ancient York Masons, Washington Naval Lodge 4 Commemorative Stone Westmoreland County Virginia (60' level) West Moreland County Virginia Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument West Moreland County Virginia Commemorative Stone United Sons of America (70' level) United Sons of America, Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument United Sons of America, Pennsylvania Commemorative Stone National Park Getaway: Constitution Gardens In the heart of the nation’s capital tucked between iconic monuments and memorials, Constitution Gardens is a peaceful retreat from the bustling city around it. The 50-acre park is a living legacy to the creation of a republic and to those who founded the nation. Visitor reading signatures on a semi-circular stone memorial Summer in the Parks (1968-1976) What began as a summer transportation program to send DC urban youth to Catoctin and Prince William Forest Parks in 1966 grew to a city-wide summer-long festival attracting residents to parks in every quadrant of the city. After the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., the program took on an additional role to help save a city from destroying itself. A group of boys smiles for the camera Memorial Day - Over 150 Years of Remembrance When did the first Memorial Day happen? The answer is a lot more complicated than you think! Black and white image, in memoriam is on a sign on top of American Flag buntings on a bandstand. The Vandalization of the Cherry Trees in 1941 The American public’s infuriated response to Japan’s surprise attack at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, took many forms. Military recruiting offices were swamped with young volunteers. Other people went to work in the war factories. There were also mistakes as well, such as the internment of Japanese-Americans, and misplaced anger at simply anything from Japan. Woman sitting on a railing underneath a cherry blossom tree; 1936. The Witness Tree Imagine Washington, DC without cherry blossoms. It’s difficult to do, as Japanese flowering cherry tree blossoms have become synonymous with springtime in our nation’s capital. The multitudes of people who gather joyously at the Tidal Basin each spring can thank Tokyo, Japan for gifting these iconic trees to the American people in 1912. In bloom cherry blossom tree hanging over water under moonlight. Two Memorials and the Cherry Blossoms National Mall’s iconic memorials to Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, and George Washington are influenced by Greek, Roman, and Egyptian art and architecture. However, the memorials to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. are from a different era. A small still pool. Trees are in the background. George Washington and the Cherry Tree The story goes that when Washington was six years old, he received a hatchet as a gift, after which he promptly went and cut down his father’s favorite cherry tree. Man and boy standing outside a cabin next to a tree with and ax beside them. The Cherry Tree Rebellion "The Cherry Tree Rebellion" of November 1938 was the final battle in a prolonged campaign to prevent construction of the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in Washington, DC. From its inception in 1934 the project had been mired in controversy. Six women in fur coats chained to a cherry tree. Hanami Strolling among the blossoming cherry trees in Washington, DC has been a cherished rite of spring for more than a century in the Nation's Capital. But in the trees’ homeland of Japan, the tradition of viewing the cherry blossoms, known as 'hanami,' dates back more than 1,200 years! Historic Japanese engraving of people observing the cherry blossoms Some Assembly Required, or The Oldest Puzzle in the Park This Japanese Pagoda is a symbol of friendship dedicated on April 18, 1958 by the Mayor of Yokohama and presented to the District of Columbia. Photo of a Japanese Pagoda Japanese Stone Lantern Presented to the city of Washington on March 30, 1954, this stone lantern symbolizes the enduring cultural partnership that re-emerged between Japan and the United States after World War II. Japanese stone lantern among blossoming cherry trees Disability History: Military and Disability The United States has a long history of caring for its service men and women. Since the Civil War era, the Federal Government has provided doctors to support its veterans’ physical and emotional well-being. Battlefields and military hospitals help tell this story. All sites related to war and military action have disability history, since war inevitably means some soldiers will come home with short-term or long-lasting disabilities. Exterior view of a stone hotel in Yosemite The World War II Memorial in Washington DC: An Interpretive Guide Thousands of veterans who served in World War II witnessed the formal dedication of the memorial. Designed by the former chief of the Rhode Island School of Design, Friedrich St. Florian, the memorial illustrates the clear relationship between the home front and the battle front, as Americans at home and those fighting abroad relied upon each other’s support in this defining moment of the 20th Century. aerial view of the World War II Memorial Washington Canal Eventually turned into the B Street sewer, the development of Washington Canal saw much criticism from the public and was originally planned to perform various functions. L'Enfant-Ellicott map of Washington, 1792 Your Voice Matters: Stand Up For What You Believe In! Women fought for the right to vote for years before the 19th Amendment was ratified in 1920. They did this by organizing themselves and getting others to follow them. In this activity you will learn about the 19th amendment and get a chance to create your own movement to help society. Are you up for the challenge? Example of a mascot that a Junior Ranger submitted saying that everyone should be able to travel. Links to the Past In the summer of 2016 the National Park Service began a study on the history and design of the National Park Service golf courses at East Potomac Park, Rock Creek Park, and Langston. The study will provides historical information and will be used as a planning tool for the ongoing management and public use of these golf courses. A man instructs boys in golf The World War II Home Front An extremely important, but sometimes overlooked, aspect of World War II was America’s overwhelming home front effort. The contributions of millions of stateside Americans to the war effort is commemorated in the World War II Memorial. Woman with sleeves rolled up saying "We Can Do It!" 2017 National Fossil Day Celebration National Fossil Day 2017 represents the eighth year of a nationwide partnership which promotes the scientific and educational value of fossils. The National Fossil Day partnership has expanded to include 350 partners across the U.S., with partners in every state providing more opportunities for fossil education for the public. skull on the national mall March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom It was the largest gathering for civil rights of its time. An estimated 250,000 people attended the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, arriving in Washington, D.C. by planes, trains, cars, and buses from all over the country. B&W photo of crowds on mall from lincoln memorial Archeology in the Monumental Core: Part 2 Recent construction projects along 17th Street have revealed a few archeological sites associated with the landscapes that existed prior to creation of the Monumental Core park lands. Archeological documentation of the lock keeper’s house foundation during sewer manhole replaceme Flood Abatement and Landmass Creation: Part 1 Catastrophic floods have occurred throughout the D.C.'s history, and efforts to provide flood protection also have a long history. Shipping Channels in the Potomac River The L'Enfant Plan Pierre L’Enfant’s city plan of 1790 features a network of broad diagonal axes superimposed over a more traditional pattern of east-west and north-south streets. Aerial View of West Potomac Park Archeology in the Monumental Core: Part 1 Over the past few years, a number of development projects in the Monumental Core have allowed archeologists to re-examine these assumptions and to document an archeological record of some historical interest. Artifacts from Washington Monument Grounds Flood Abatement and Landmass Creation: Part 2 While lacking the glamour and profile of the Eiffel Tower or the Brooklyn Bridge, the reclamation of Potomac Flats stands as a major engineering achievement of the late 19th century. Map of Potomac River The 17th Street Wharf The wharf at 17th Street was a prominent feature of the 19th -century landscape in D.C. Detail of Map of Washington City Oak Decline Learn more about oak decline where a host of stressors interact to weaken trees over time, leading to what becomes "death by a thousand cuts." Looking up into the canopy of a mature oak showing symptoms of oak decline. National Engineering Week – Sean Kennealy Working for National Park Service (NPS) has allowed me to problem-solve and develop a variety of engineering solutions to nationally historic and iconic structures, as well as being part of a team to plan, design and construct new memorials in Washington, D.C. Additionally, NPS engineering positions provide a career path with personal growth opportunities that are never static. Sean Kennealy. Uncovering the history of D.C.'s Landscape Although the formally landscaped public lands of D.C. are a now premier tourist destination and a stage for countless celebrations and demonstrations, the history of the underlying landscape is little known. Aerial View of West Potomac Park Memorials for the Future Memorials for the Future, is a competition that aims to rethink the way we develop and experience memorials in Washington, D.C. Memorials for the Future Logo National Parks’ Homefront Battle: Protecting Parks During WWII Though the National Park Service (NPS) was only 25 years old at the outbreak of World War II, the agency found itself fighting a battle on the homefront. With little precedent to work from and dwindling budgets and staff, the NPS strongly defended its parks against a flood of demands to log, mine, graze, drain, and take over national parks Sacrificing for the Common Good: Rationing in WWII During World War II, the United States government created a system of rationing, limiting the amount of certain goods that a person could purchase. Sacrificing certain items during became the norm for most Americans. Bronze wreath on a stone column War Bonds United States citizens’ purchase of government securities during the war made possible the herculean efforts on the battle fronts and the factories and farms of the home front. Norman Rockwell Eliza Scidmore Eliza Scidmore traveled through Alaska's Inside Passage in 1883. Her articles and travel logs shared the grandeur and adventure of Alaska with western tourists, ushering in a new era of travel and tourism to the Alaska territory. Her travels to Japan and the far east also inspired the planting of cherry trees, whose blossoms are celebrated each year in our nation's capital. Eliza Scidmore signed black and white portrait image National Mall and Memorial Parks - 2019 Partnership Report Our generous partners and volunteers provided more than $34 million in philanthropic contributions in 2018 helping us fund preservation projects, programs, commemorations, and celebrations. Aerial photo of the Washington Monument and Reflecting Pool Suffrage in 60 Seconds Woman Suffrage Procession "We demand an amendment to the Constitution of the United States enfranchising the women of this country." Marching women, floats, equestrian units--and a surprising ally participate in the first event of its kind on March 3, 1913. Enjoy this one-minute video story with Ranger Mannie. Official Program Woman Suffrage Procession March 3 1913 Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Ida B. Wells Ida B. Wells spent her life fiercely dedicated to truth and equality, including the rights of all to vote. In this Suffrage in 60 Seconds video, hear a story about the way that determination showed up during the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession. Ida B. Wells-Barnett Suffrage in Sixty Seconds logo Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Nina Allender As the official cartoonist of the National Woman's Party, Nina Allender changed public perception about what feminists looked like. But her political cartoons, while witty and provocative, excluded many people who were fighting for the vote. Combined photo of park ranger and Nina Allender with Suffrage in 60 Seconds logo Suffrage in 60 Seconds: African American Women and the Vote African American women often found themselves marginalized by both Black men and white women in the fight for equality. How did they ensure that their voices were heard? Ranger Titus has the story. Photo collage of several African American suffragists. Suffrage in 60 Seconds logo Suffrage in 60 Seconds: How Women Won the West Women in the western states and territories won the first victories in the fight for woman suffrage. But there were difficult battles marked by reversals, defeats, and questionable alliances. Largo group of women wearing white carrying shields with names of western states Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Deadly Political Index Maud Younger, chief lobbyist of the National Woman’s Party, greased the gears of democracy. While the unrelenting force of the National Woman's Party protests kept the momentum of the movement, would the 19th Amendment have gotten through Congress without suffragist lobbyists? Ranger Lorne has the details of the Deadly Political Index. Painting and photo of Maud Younger with Suffrage in 60 Seconds Logo Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Harry Burn When the Tennessee state legislature opened a special session to consider ratification of the 19th Amendment in August 1920, no one knew whether woman suffrage was headed for victory or defeat. What--and who--made the difference? Ranger Chip has the story of the drama in Nashville. Portrait of Harry Burn and picture of Alice Paul unfurling ratification banner over a balcony Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Temperance What does woman suffrage have to do with alcohol? Woman's Christian Temperance Union leaders like Frances Willard and Frances Watkins Harper convinced WCTU members that they could accomplish social change if women won the vote. Frances Willard and Frances Harper with WCTU and Suffrage in 60 Seconds logos Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Colors Why did the National Woman's Party choose Gold, White, and Purple as their signature colors on sashes, flags, and banners in their fight for the 19th Amendment? In this episode of Suffrage in 60 Seconds, Ranger Lauren has the answer. Alice Paul unfurling Ratification Banner. Suffrage in 60 Seconds logo Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Picketing the White House "Mr. President, How Long Must Women Wait for Liberty?" asked National Woman's Party picketers as they stood outside the White House gates in all kinds of weather. Ranger Mannie tells the story about the tactic of picketing in the fight for woman suffrage. Women wearing sashes standing in front of White House with banners Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Pockets In 1915, poet Alice Duer Miller published "Are Women People? A Book of Rhymes for Suffrage Times." Her poem titled "Why We Oppose Pockets for Women" is a satire about arguments against women voting. Why We Oppose Pockets for Women poem with NPS logo Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Jail Door Pin The women who faced arrest for protesting at the White House in support of women's right to vote were not ashamed that they had been to jail. In fact, they wore it as a badge of honor. Ranger Lauren tells the story of the Jail Door Pin, awarded to more than one hundred women by the National Woman's Party in appreciation for their sacrifice. Blended image of jail door and suffrage banner Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Traitors or Patriots? When the United States entered World War I in April 1917, the National Woman's Party faced a decision. Should the NWP continue to pressure Woodrow Wilson to support woman suffrage? Or should they demonstrate their citizenship and patriotism by joining the war effort, hoping to win the vote that way? Ranger Lorne has the story. Merged image of Woodrow Wilson and suffrage pickets Suffrage in 60 Seconds: NAWSA Versus NWP Carrie Chapman Catt led the National American Woman's Suffrage Association (NAWSA) which had more members, more power, and more money than the National Woman's Party. Although Alice Paul and Carrie Chapman Catt were both fighting for woman suffrage, they often fought each other as they worked for passage of the 19th Amendment. Enjoy this one-minute video telling a story of the tension. Whose side are you on? Carrie Chapman Catt and Alice Paul. Suffrage in Sixty Seconds logo Suffrage in 60 Seconds: The Night of Terror The women of the National Woman's Party sentenced to prison in November 1917 for picketing the White House had no idea what awaited them when they arrived at the Occoquan Workhouse. They endured brutality and abuse from the prison guards, but remained committed to their cause. Ranger Susan provides an eyewitness account. Lucy Burns in front of jail door Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Equali-Tea How did women who were excluded from the political process work for change? Before they marched in the streets and stood on soapboxes to get the word out, women encouraged each other and spread the radical message of women's equality in their parlors. Ranger Lauren spills the tea about equali-tea. Ranger Lauren holding a tea cup that reads Suffrage in 60 Seconds Introduction When was the last time you voted? Enjoy one-minute videos that highlight suffrage subjects and the heroes who made woman suffrage a reality—including those women who continued the fight for full enfranchisement beyond 1920. Alice Paul in front of Ratification Banner. Suffrage in Sixty Seconds logo National Parkway Getaway: World War II Memorial Commemorating one of the most honorable displays of American resolve and sacrifice, the World War II Memorial remembers and celebrates the members of the Armed Forces of the United States of America who served their country bravely during the Second World War and those on the home front who diligently supported war efforts. Memorial columns around a fountain at night Resurrection City “It was in our wallowing together in the mud of Resurrection City that we were allowed to hear, to feel, and to see each other for the first time in our American experience.” -Rev. Jesse L. Jackson. Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Inez Milholland Who was the New Woman of the 20th Century, the Herald of the Future, who rode a white horse at the beginning of the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession down Pennsylvania Avenue? Inez Milholland was a lawyer, an activist, and a powerful speaker who was also known as the "Most Beautiful Suffragist." Inez Milholland on horse in suffrage procession National Woman's Party Protests During World War I During the war years, women's suffrage supporters waged their own war on injustice at home, demanding the right to vote, and turning President Wilson's words against him. Women wearing long coats and sashes carry signs in front of the White House. Wales (240' level) Country of Wales Commemorative Stone within the Washington Monument Country of Wales Commemorative Stone Explore DC’s national parks with a new, free app Navigate to popular destinations, get up-to-date information and discover lesser-known parks. With nearly 800 points of interest, the app includes the National Mall, President's Park, Rock Creek Park, Anacostia Park, Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, Wolf Trap, Arlington House, Theodore Roosevelt Island, Frederick Douglass NHS, Mary McLeod Bethune Council House NHS, Carter G. Woodson NHS, and hundreds more. National Park Service logo with Washington Monument and other memorials. DC War Memorial Cultural Landscape The District of Columbia War Memorial was built in 1931 out of white marble quarried in Vermont. The memorial is significant for its artistic and commemorative value as a monument honoring those District of Columbia residents who served in World War I. Grassy area in front of rotunda, encircled by marble columns and surrounded by leafy trees. The Mall Cultural Landscape The Mall is a simple but monumental landscape in the center of Washington, DC. The landscape, view, and spatial organization are all interdependent and reinforce each other. It was first conceived as part of the L'Enfant Plan in the 1790s, with most of the construction between 1932 and 1936. The views and walkways across the open space connect the Capitol Building and the Washington Monument, which is on axis with the White House, serving as a symbol of American democracy. A broad walkway flanked with elm trees creates a vista looking toward the Capitol Building. Farragut Square Cultural Landscape Farragut Square is a formal urban park, located a short distance north of the White House and occupying a rectangular site bounded by major streets: K Street on the north, I Street on the south, and 17th Street on both the east and west. An aerial view of Farragut Square within its surrounding urban context in Washington, DC Franklin Park Cultural Landscape Franklin Park is a rectangular park of almost five acres occupying an entire block. It is oriented east-west and bounded by K Street on the north, 13th Street on the east, I Street on the south, and 14th Street on the west. An aerial view of Franklin Square, including the surrounding urban fabric. Columbus Plaza Cultural Landscape Columbus Plaza, U.S. Reservation 334, is a semi-circular two level plaza located at the intersection of Massachusetts, Delaware, and Louisiana Avenues, and E and 1st Streets NE. The 940’ long by 540’ wide brick plaza is the forecourt of Union Station. Overhead view of Columbus Plaza McPherson Square Cultural Landscape McPherson Square is a 1.66-acre park lying in the heart of Washington, D.C.’s central business district. It occupies an entire city square surrounded by K Street to the north, I Street to the south, and 15th Street to the east and west. An aerial image of McPherson Square. Walk in the Footsteps of Suffragists American women demanded their right to vote in a Declaration of Sentiments issued at the first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, NY in 1848. By the 1913 inauguration of President-elect Wilson, women were still waiting for that democratic right. Explore the spectacular pre-inauguration parade that filled Pennsylvania Avenue in DC with 5,000 marching women, colorful floats and banners, ladies on horseback, and mayhem delivered by opposing forces. Nurse Contingent in the 1913 Suffrage March LOC Building the District of Columbia War Memorial The DC War Memorial honors DC's residents who gave their lives in the Great War. A marble colonnade with a dome. Silent Sentinels of Storied Landscapes From the majestic elms along the National Mall and the stately oaks of Capitol Hill to the historic magnolias of the White House, and the graceful blossoms of the cherry trees, these trees not only witness history, but also serve as representatives of our nation's urban forests. The Washington Monument towers over cherry trees along the Tidal Basin. Belmont-Paul Virtual Tour Join Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument staff as we explore the exhibits and objects on display in the museum. Do you see yourself in the Hall of Portraits? What treasured items connect you with the past? Interior photo of the Belmont-Paul Hall of Portraits with paintings and a large mirror Constitution Gardens Cultural Landscape Designed by the Washington office of the architectural firm Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in the early 1970s, Constitution Gardens is the firm’s interpretation of the barely sketched design for this area offered by the 1902 McMillan Plan. An image of the distant Washington Monument reflects in the waters of Constitution Gardens Lake. Beautification: A Legacy of Lady Bird Johnson As a champion of conservation efforts and environmental causes, Lady Bird Johnson initiated the Beautification Project to improve the quality of life for residents of Washington, D.C. through the renewal and improvement of public spaces. The environmental and aesthetic improvements of Beautification included tree-lined avenues, floral displays, design guidelines, improvements to pedestrian circulation, renovation of historic buildings, and litter clean up. A man in a tie and a woman in a yellow dress sit between an expanse of daffodils and a wide river National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Eliza Scidmore Eliza Scidmore traveled through Alaska's Inside Passage in 1883. Her articles and travel logs shared the grandeur of Alaska with western tourists, opening Alaska to tourism. Eliza Scidmore Spotted Lanternfly 101 What you need to know about spotted lanternfly: a new, invasive, insect pest approaching the National Parks of the Mid-Atlantic. A spotted lanternfly with wings spread showing namesake spots 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession The Woman Suffrage Procession along Pennsylvania Avenue on March 3, 1913, the day before Woodrow Wilson's presidential inauguration, used pageantry to raise awareness about women's exclusion from the nation's political process. The publicity following the event re-energized the woman suffrage movement in the United States. Cover of the Woman Suffrage Procession program with herald on horseback Women in World War I Five million men were mobilized for war. Nine million women mobilized themselves. Joy Bright Hancock in navy uniform Suffrage Envoy Sara Bard Field In 1915, suffragist Sara Bard Field drove thousands of miles across the United States collection signatures on a petition in support of women's right to vote. Ranger Lorne has the story of her incredible journey. Photograph of three women in coats and hats standing in front of open top automobile with banner Natural Science, History, & Culture in the National Capital Area Learn more about your National Capital Area park through this guide to natural and cultural resource information. Cultural resource staff clean the Theodore Roosevelt memorial statue at Theodore Roosevelt Island. National Park Getaway: Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, was one of the 20th century’s most influential figures. The Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial, the newest in the nation’s capital, pays tribute to this remarkable historic figure with heroic-sized bronze sculptures, stone bas reliefs, and quotations from his most famous speeches and addresses. Volunteer talking to a visitor in a memorial plaza Suffrage in 60 Seconds: Forward Into Light If you could write a letter to the woman of the future, what would you say? Alice Paul did just that when she contributed to an article series in The Washington Times asking prominent women and men to offer their predictions for the future. Her answer: "Women Will Be Real Equals in 2023." Black and white photo of Alice Paul with text "The World 100 Years From Now" superimposed over it Series: Disability History The Disability History series brings attention to some of the many disability stories interwoven across the National Park Service’s 400+ units and its programs. “Disability stories” refer to the array of experiences by, from, and about people with disabilities represented across our nation. People with disabilities are the largest minority in the United States, but their stories often remain untold. Statue of FDR in his wheelchair Series: Suffrage in Sixty Seconds When was the last time you voted? For the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution enfranchising women, park rangers at the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument created these one-minute videos that highlight suffrage subjects and the heroes who made woman suffrage a reality—including those women who continued the fight for full enfranchisement beyond 1920. Alice Paul raises glass above ratification banner Series: History and Archeology of the District of Columbia Monumental Core The Monumental Core in the District of Columbia contains some of the nation’s most iconic landscapes, landmarks and memorials. The modern landscape bears little resemblance to the natural environment or the nineteenth-century city. (series by Charles LeeDecker) Aerial view of West Potomac Park Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Washington Monument Commemorative Stones Take a virtual walk down tour to see the commemorative stones within the Washington Monument. The order of the stones in this series is as if you were walking down from the top of the monument to the bottom. Commemorative Stones within the Washington Monument Series: Park Paleontology News - Vol. 09, No. 2, Fall 2017 All across the park system, scientists, rangers, and interpreters are engaged in the important work of studying, protecting, and sharing our rich fossil heritage. <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/newsletters.htm">Park Paleontology news</a> provides a close up look at the important work of caring for these irreplaceable resources. <ul><li>Contribute to Park Paleontology News by contacting the <a href="https://www.nps.gov/common/utilities/sendmail/sendemail.cfm?o=5D8CD5B898DDBB8387BA1DBBFD02A8AE4FBD489F4FF88B9049&r=/subjects/geoscientistsinparks/photo-galleries.htm">newsletter editor</a></li><li>Learn more about <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossils/">Fossils & Paleontology</a> </li><li>Celebrate <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/fossilday/">National Fossil Day</a> with events across the nation</li></ul> skull on the lawn at the national mall Who Said This: Inaugural Speech Edition Presidents give an address to the nation during their inauguration ceremony. On this page, play a game of quotes and guess who said what in their inaugural speech! There will be three hints for each quote. See how well you do! A ceremony set up with a crowd gathered, prominently showing red, white and blue decorations Inauguration Junior Ranger Game: Presidents & Parks Can you identify these iconic National Parks? President Theodore Roosevelt was instrumental in the conservation of America's wild spaces. Explore the map and images here to see if you can identify the five national parks established by "the conservation president!" A blue lake surrounded by trees in the foreground and a mountain in the background on a bright day Inauguration Junior Ranger Game: Presidential Memorials Explore Presidential Memorials on the National Mall in Washington D.C.! We remember presidents in metal and stone... in fact, you may even have one of these famous items in your pocket! Investigate the maps and photos to learn more about some famous presidential memorials. A dramatic view of the Lincoln Memorial, white stone columns backlit against a dramatic stormy sky Inauguration Junior Ranger Game: Plan Your Inauguration Every four years a president and vice president are elected and sworn in to office. Could you be the president of the United States one day? Dream up the elements of your presidential inauguration in this inauguration imagination activity! Theodore Roosevelt in a carriage surrounded by people walking process down a city street Lincoln's Second Inauguration Enshrined on the walls of the Lincoln Memorial and regarded as one of his two greatest speeches, Lincoln's Second Inaugural remains the benchmark for incoming and reelected presidents. More than elucidating why the Civil War was fought, the speech offers a promising potential vision of a newly changed nation. This message of reconciliation created an indelible link with Lincoln’s first inauguration, as the two inaugural speeches bookended a momentous and poignant presidency. Crowd on the East Front of the US Capitol Inauguration Junior Ranger Game: Inaugurations & Technology Explore presidential inaugurations and technology! There have been great advances in technology since the first American presidential inauguration. Who was the first president whose inauguration was photographed? Which inauguration was first broadcast on the internet? Test your knowledge and find out here! Three people sit in front of a bank of television screens at the WETA Inauguration Junior Ranger Game: Did You Know? Explore presidential inauguration trivia! What was the first capital city of the United States, were President George Washington was first inaugurated? Who was the first president to be inaugurated in Washington, D.C.? Test your knowledge and check your answers here! Painting of a scene outside Congress Hall during George Washington's inauguration. Marian Anderson and Constitution Hall The singer’s outdoor concert became a symbol for Civil Rights activism nation-wide. Anderson sings to crowd from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on April 9, 1939 Leaders in Coins: Eisenhower and Anthony How important are individuals in the work for change? How do leaders set the stage for the next generation? Ranger Lorne looks at coins from the United States Mint to investigate the common leadership characteristics between woman suffrage leader Susan B. Anthony and President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Eisenhower and Anthony coins with Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument arrowhead logo Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial - The Prologue Room The Prologue Room of the Franklin Delano Memorial was added in 2001, four years after the dedication, and features a statue of Roosevelt in a wheelchair to demonstrate that after contracting polio at the age of 39, "this great President was great with his disability." Statue of Franklin Roosevelt in a wheelchair. Leaders in Equality: The Portrait Monument Ranger Lorne tells the story of the installation of the Portrait Monument in the Capitol Rotunda on February 15, 1921. The sculpture by Adelaide Johnson and commissioned by the National Woman's Party incorporates busts of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, three founders of the woman suffrage movement, into a large block of white marble. What does the design, the ceremony, and the statue's fate tell us about the ongoing struggle for women's equality? The Portrait Monument depicting Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton Benjamin Banneker Park Renovation The National Park Service has undertaken a project to restore Benjamin Banneker Park which will include repair of the fountain, cleaning of the masonry, and replacement of trees and subsoil at the site. Korean War Veterans Memorial Wall of Remembrance The National Park Service and the Korean War Veterans Memorial Foundation are building a Wall of Remembrance and and completing an overall rehabilitation of the Korean War Veterans Memorial. Rendering of Korean War Veterans Memorial Wall of Remembrance at night National Mall and Memorial Parks Ceremonies and Commemorations 2020 Men in uniform walk along the Korean War Veterans Memorial wall. Men in uniform walk along the Korean War Veterans Memorial wall. National Mall and Memorial Parks Programming 2020 Jonathan David Martin and Laura C. Harris in the Ford’s Theatre production of Silent Sky, directed by Seema Sueko. A man and a woman stand leaning on a railing in front of night background with hanging lights. National Mall and Memorial Parks Preservation and Beautification 2020 A Golden Triangle BID Ambassador sweeps an area of Farragut Square. A man in yellow sweeps trash with a statue in the background.  National Mall and Memorial Parks Volunteers In Parks 2020 Volunteers and staff pose by a memorial wreathe at the World War II Memorial. Men and women in yellow and black stand by a wreathe. National Mall and Memorial Parks Collaborations 2020 Sheila Johnson, Vice Chair of the Trust for the National Mall, led the campaign to restore the US Park Police Horse Stables and build the new Education Center, opening early 2022. A woman gestures while speaking at a podium. Forsythia at the George Mason Memorial Prior to construction of the George Mason Memorial near the Tidal Basin, the site was known for its association with Fountain No. 4 and the surrounding planting beds, composed of thousands of pansies ringed by a golden hedge of forsythia. Notably, Fountain No. 4 was one of four fountains that was historically associated with a nearby 50-acre nursery and rose garden. Today, Fountain No. 4 remains as one of the oldest features within West Potomac Park. A view through trees of a round fountain surrounded by garden beds and flowering shrubs. Teaching Justice: Ida B. Wells in the Suffrage Procession Have you ever wondered how to respond when you are told that you cannot do something? Have you seen someone else being excluded or left out? In this Teaching Justice activity using the Suffrage in 60 Seconds video about Ida B. Wells, students discuss the experience of being excluded unfairly. What responsibility do we have to stand up to exclusion, prejudice, and injustice? Head and shoulders portrait of Ida B. Wells looking over her left shoulder Teaching Justice: Protest When is protest an effective tactic for social change? Using two Suffrage in 60 Seconds videos about the National Woman's Party's campaign of picketing the White House, this lesson invites fourth grade students to discuss collective action against injustice. What strategies are most effective in convincing others to change their mind? Three women with suffrage sashes stand outside the White House holding a large banner Teaching Justice: Symbols of Suffrage Women in the suffrage movement had multiple items they wore that identified them as suffragists and supporters or advocates for the movement. Not only would they wear these items while they were protesting or picketing, but they would wear them to meetings and out in public settings. This activity designed for fifth grade students uses a historic photograph as a primary source to engage students with issues of identity, appearance, and bias. Suffragists picketing with Banner Teaching Justice: Suffrage Prisoners Banner Have you ever spoken out when you saw someone mistreated? This anti-bias learning activity designed for fifth graders uses a photograph of Mary Winsor protesting against the imprisonment of suffrage protesters to spark discussion about the responsibility to stand up to exclusion, prejudice, and injustice. Mary Winsor holding a banner that reads "To Ask Freedom for Women is Not a Crime." Teaching Justice: The Prison Special and the Courage to Speak Out When have you needed courage? In this anti-bias learning activity for fifth grade, students explore questions about when and how to take a stand against bias and injustice in their everyday lives. Using photographs of Lucy Burns, co-founder of the National Woman's Party and the woman who spent more time in prison than any other American suffragist, students engage with questions about the courage needed to speak out for social justice. A line of women in prison dress in a train station. Front woman carries a banner Teaching Justice: Forward Into Light How are signs and banners used for social change? In this anti-bias learning activity designed for fifth grade, students examine a suffrage banner and compare it to signs used by other movements for justice. They analyze how words and slogans have been used as strategies in the history of social justice and imagine how they can take a stand against bias and injustice in their everyday lives. Suffrage banner at Belmont-Paul museum with slogan that includes "Forward Into Light" Series: Teaching Justice Identity. Diversity. Justice. Action. These learning activities engage students with the history of women's ongoing struggle for equality. Each lesson uses an item from the National Woman's Party collection or an aspect of the story of suffrage to make connections to broad questions of equity and the work of social change using anti-bias objectives from the Learning for Justice framework. A word cloud at Belmont-Paul with the question Teaching Justice: Arrested How does identity shape our interactions with others? In this anti-bias learning activity designed for fifth and sixth grade, students examine three photographs of women arrested for protesting for the right to vote. Through discussion, students will recognize that people's multiple identities interact and create unique and complex individuals. Two suffragists carrying banners held by the arms by a police woman as a crowd looks on Brood X Periodical Cicadas FAQ Learn about the Brood X periodical cicadas that will emerge in 2021 throughout the Mid-Atlantic U.S. A perched periodical cicada with red eyes and orange wings Teaching Justice: Suffrage Cartoons How can art be used to change people's minds? What happens when we leave someone out of the picture? In this anti-bias learning activity, students evaluate the political cartoons of suffragist Nina Allender to discover how women are represented in her art, and who is left out. Then they will create their own artwork, responding to diversity by building empathy, respect, understanding, and connection. Cartoonist Nina Allender seated with work in progress on her lap Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for Visiting the National Mall Memorial Day weekend usually marks the beginning of the summer travel season. Across the country, friends, families, and individuals will head out to enjoy adventures and make memories. Of course, national parks - including the National Mall - are popular destinations. To help you #PlanLikeAParkRanger, we're offering our Top 10 tips to help you on your next National Mall visit. Text reading Teaching Justice: Anti-Suffrage Postcards How have you responded when you have been teased or ridiculed? In this anti-bias learning activity designed for sixth-eighth grade, students will examine four anti-suffrage postcards from the early 20th century and analyze how women (and men) are represented. They will make connections with the way women are characterized today while learning to exchange ideas and beliefs in an open-minded way. Color illustration labeled "Militant Suffragists" with three children parading, carrying signs John Logan: War Hero, Public Servant, Founder of Memorial Day It is fitting and proper that General John Logan should be honored with a prominent statue in the nation's capital. He was an effective military leader who fought in many Civil War battles, a successful and active politician, head of the Grand Army of the Republic veterans organization, and is credited with establishing Memorial Day as a national day of remembrance for those who lost their lives in the Civil War. Equestrian Statue Honoring General John A. Logan at Logan Circle in Washington DC Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road. Teaching Justice: She's Good Enough How can popular culture be used in the work of social change? In this anti-bias learning activity for sixth-eighth grade, students examine a suffrage illustration modeled on a popular cartoon circulated during Teddy Roosevelt's re-election campaign. They will analyze the use of cultural touchstones to change public perception about an issue, and evaluate which strategies are most effective when planning collective action against injustice. Illustrated sheet music cover for Improving roads and multi-use trails around the National Mall Learn about multi-use trail, crosswalk and road improvements planned near the National Mall Truck and construction barrels on a road near the Washington Monument. Teaching Justice: Six Reasons for Suffrage What actions should you take when facing injustice? In this anti-bias learning activity designed for sixth-eighth grades, students examine a flier created by the National American Woman Suffrage Association that lists six reasons that women should be enfranchised across the country by amending the U.S. Constitution. They will analyze the arguments presented by the suffragists and identify unfairness at the individual and systemic level. Extend the lesson and create a flier! Flier from 1917 listing six reasons for woman suffrage by federal amendment How Long Must Women Wait? The Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument was home to the National Woman’s Party for more than 90 years and served as the epicenter of the struggle for women’s rights. Over the last two years, the National Park Service and Quinn Evans have collaborated on a Historic Resource Study for this nationally significant site. The study highlights the people, places, and stories that helped propel the Women’s Suffrage and Equal Rights movements in the Washington, DC, area. Purple shaded photo of women on the steps of NWP headquarters Valuing Trees and Forests in the National Capital Area Understanding that trees have value opens our eyes to their important roles across the planet as well as in parks of the National Capital Area. This StoryMap series examines the values that trees bring to the National Parks of the National Capital Area. It focuses on three parks: the National Mall and Memorial Parks, Rock Creek Park, and Monocacy National Battlefield, each of which is home to notable trees within its urban forest. The MLK Jr Memorial stands by the Tidal Basin, surrounded by cherry blossom trees. Plants and Climate Change Changing climate increases stressors that weaken plant resilience, disrupting forest structure and ecosystem services. Rising temperatures lead to more frequent droughts, wildfires, and invasive pest outbreaks, leading to the loss of plant species. That causes a ripple of problems throughout their ecosystems. Monocacy tulip poplar tree Cultural Resources and Climate Change Cultural resources are sites, structures, objects, and even landscapes that show the history of human activity and/or hold significance to a group of people traditionally associated with it. Climate change, however, is making it harder to preserve these cultural resources for future generations. Changing weather patterns, increased pests, and pollution all amplify the deterioration of our cultural and historical resources. Jefferson Memorial view from above with visitors on the steps Sea Level Rise Impact on DC Parks Sea level rise is occurring on a global scale as the result of many climate change-induced factors. It is impacting 111 National Park Service (NPS) sites nationwide. In the National Capital Region, sea level rise is occurring at a particularly rapid rate because the land bordering the Potomac and Anacostia rivers is simultaneously sinking as the water levels rise. Above view of Dyke Marsh Park Recreation and Climate Change Recreation in the National Parks will be negatively affected by climate change. Here's how parks in the National Capital Area are adapting. Three children sit next to a lake and fish Lincoln Memorial Education Series: The Dedication There were three main speakers at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial on May 30, 1922. Chief Justice William Howard Taft, President Warren Harding and Dr. Robert Moton. Both Taft and Harding remarked on the memorial’s emphasis towards national unity, insisting that emancipation was of secondary importance and a byproduct of war. Dr. Moton, on the other hand, used the occasion to plea for racial justice and claimed the “greatness for Abraham Lincoln lies in this, that amid Lincoln Memorial Dedication Speeches Lincoln Memorial Education Series: Tale of Two Ceremonies Students will compare newspaper articles from two different sources describing the Lincoln Memorial dedication ceremony and decide whether bias existed in the coverage of the dedication. Students will discuss why newspapers chose to cover the dedication the way they did. Scene at the Dedication of the Lincoln Memorial Lincoln Memorial Education Series: The Censorship of Dr. Robert Moton Twelve days prior to the dedication, Chief Justice William Howard Taft, president of the Lincoln Memorial Commission, asked to review Dr. Moton’s speech. Finding it to be too radical he insisted that several sections be removed, particularly those that criticized the federal government for its failure to protect the rights of African Americans. Speakers at the dedication of the Lincoln Memorial Lincoln Memorial Education Series: Royal Cortissoz and the Epitaph Royal Cortissoz, an art critic and columnist for the New York Herald Tribune, was asked to write the words that appears above the Lincoln Statue. He believed the inscription should be simple, easy to remember and convey one great idea that would appeal to everyone. Lincoln Statue and Epitaph Series: What Does the Lincoln Memorial Mean to Me? These learning activities engage middle and high school students with the history and meaning of the Lincoln Memorial. Each lesson focuses on a different aspect of the Lincoln Memorial dedication in 1922 and used primary sources to make connections between the intended purpose and the actual meaning of the memorial. Lincoln Memorial Dedication Teaching Justice: Frenemies How do we resolve conflict? What happens when those working for change agree on the goal but not the methods? In this learning activity for 9th-12th grade, students examine tensions in the suffrage movement using essays and a video about the topic. They will recognize that people’s multiple identities interact and create unique and complex individuals. Using what they learn, they will develop conflict resolution strategies. Jeannette Rankin standing up in an open-topped car with four other women around her September 11, 2001, NPS Oral History Project This oral history project recorded the memories and perspectives of NPS staff who experienced the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Transcripts and a 2004 report about the NPS response are available online. A petinad hand holds a flame aloft in the air. Write-Out Prompt: A Message from Beyond at the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality NM In this video for the National Writing Project's Write Out, staff at the Belmont-Paul Women's Equality National Monument share stories of the spirits of fierce women that inspire us. Writing prompt: Imagine that someone from the past visited you as a ghost. What message does the spirit have for you? Write a story or create a meme. #WriteOut NPS Intern Nia stands next to a white board with the writing prompt Sea Level Rise in the DC Area Learn about current and projected rates of sea level rise in the greater DC area, based on local water level data collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) A tall white cylinder attached to a wooden pier with Hains Point in the background. Annual test installation of levee to close part of 17th Street on September 29 2021 On Wednesday, September 29, the National Park Service will close 17th Street between Constitution Avenue NW and Independence Avenue SW from 4 a.m. until approximately 4 p.m. to perform a test installation of the 17th Street levee. Motorists, pedestrians and cyclists should plan alternative routes accordingly to bypass the closed area. The annual test installation is necessary to ensure the levee closure can be erected properly in the event of high water. Levee being assembled There Was Something Fishy Going on There... At the time of the completion of the Washington Monument, its grounds were home to manmade lakes that bred thousands of carp a year. Grounds of the Washington Monument with fish ponds The Point of the Matter The Washington Monument is topped with what was considered a precious metal in 1884 - aluminum! Aluminum capstone of the Washington Monument

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