Natchez Trace

National Scenic Trail - AL,MS,TN

The Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail consists of five sections of hiking trail running roughly parallel to the 444-mile long Natchez Trace Parkway scenic motor road. The foot trails total more than 60 miles, and offer opportunities to explore wetlands, swamps, hardwood forest, rock outcroppings, overlooks, and the history of the area.

maps

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Natchez Trace - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Natchez Trace Parkway (PKWY) in Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/natt/index.htm The Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail consists of five sections of hiking trail running roughly parallel to the 444-mile long Natchez Trace Parkway scenic motor road. The foot trails total more than 60 miles, and offer opportunities to explore wetlands, swamps, hardwood forest, rock outcroppings, overlooks, and the history of the area. Directions to the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail vary greatly depending on what section you are trying to reach. For specific questions concerning how to get to a certain section or trail head of the National Scenic Trail, please call the Visitor Center at 1-800-305-7417. Natchez Trace Parkway Visitor Center The National Park Service administers the scenic trail site through the Natchez Trace Parkway.Visitors are welcome to learn more about the scenic at the Parkway Visitor Center, located at milepost 266 On the Natchez Trace Parkway near Tupelo, Mississippi. The Parkway Visitor Center is open every day of the year except Thanksgiving. December 25, and January 1 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Central Time). The Parkway Visitor Center is located at milepost 266 on the Natchez Trace Parkway. The visitor center is located near the intersection of highway 145 and the Natchez Trace Parkway north of Tupelo, Mississippi. GPS Address for the Visitor Center: 2680 Natchez Trace Parkway Tupelo, MS 38804 Potkopinu Section of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail Potkopinu Section of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail The Potkopinu section, between milepost 17 and 20, follows the historic Old Trace. The "sunken" nature of the trail is due to the footsteps of thousands of travelers between the 1780s and 1820s in the soft loess soil. Rocky Springs Section of the Natchez Trace National Scenic Trail A section of the Old Trace at Rocky Springs (MP 52.4-59) A section of the Old Trace at Rocky Springs (MP 52.4-59) Yockanookany Section Trail Head at Cypress Swamp A fork in the trail with directional signs Access to the Yockanookany section of the National Scenic Trail at Cypress Swamp (MP 122) Great White Dog Ofi' Tohbi' Long ago Ofi' Tohbi', a great white dog, led Chicsha and Chatah and their people to settle in the southeast. Sitting white German Shepherd dog Emancipation and the Quest for Freedom Although the abolition of slavery emerged as a dominant objective of the Union war effort, most Northerners embraced abolition as a practical measure rather than a moral cause. The war resolved legally and constitutionally the single most important moral question that afflicted the nascent republic, an issue that prevented the country from coalescing around a shared vision of freedom, equality, morality, and nationhood. Slave family seated in front of their house

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