"Heart of the Monster" by NPS Photo , public domain

Nez Perce

National Historical Park - ID,MT,OR,WA

The Nez Perce National Historical Park comprises 38 sites located throughout the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, which included traditional aboriginal lands of the Nez Perce people. The sites are strongly associated with the resistance of Chief Joseph and his band, who in June 1877 took off from Oregon in an attempt to reach freedom in Canada and avoid being forced on to a reservation. They were pursued by US Cavalry and fought numerous skirmishes against them. The 38 sites span three main ecoregions, covering a wide range of elevations and climate. Numerous animal species inhabit the park, including several that are considered sensitive.

maps

Official visitor map of Nez Perce National Historical Park (NHP) in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Nez Perce - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Nez Perce National Historical Park (NHP) in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Lewis & Clark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail (NHT) in Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota and Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.Montana State - Montana Highway Map

Highway Map of Montana. Published by the Montana Department of Transportation.

https://www.nps.gov/nepe/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nez_Perce_National_Historical_Park The Nez Perce National Historical Park comprises 38 sites located throughout the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, which included traditional aboriginal lands of the Nez Perce people. The sites are strongly associated with the resistance of Chief Joseph and his band, who in June 1877 took off from Oregon in an attempt to reach freedom in Canada and avoid being forced on to a reservation. They were pursued by US Cavalry and fought numerous skirmishes against them. The 38 sites span three main ecoregions, covering a wide range of elevations and climate. Numerous animal species inhabit the park, including several that are considered sensitive. Since time immemorial, the valleys, prairies, mountains, and plateaus of the inland northwest have been home to the Nimiipuu (Nez Perce) people. Extremely resilient, they survived the settling of the United States and adapted to a changed world. Nez Perce National Historical Park consists of 38 places important to the history and culture of the Nimiipuu. Explore these places. Learn their stories. Driving south bound on U.S. Highway 95 you will find the Visitor Center 10 miles from Lewiston, ID. Roughly one mile after crossing the Clearwater River you will find the park entrance on your left. When driving north on U.S. Highway 95 the Visitor Center will be 3 miles north of Lapwai, ID. The park entrance will be on your right. Nez Perce National Historical Park Visitor Center Contains a museum, park film, junior ranger program, and various maps and brochures. Take Flight Birds in flight across a grassy field. Birds take flight across a grassy field. Buffalo Eddy Petroglyph carvings on the bank of the Snake River. Buffalo Eddy contains many petroglyphs and is considered a ancient crossing place. Painted Tipi Colorful painted tipi on green lawn Every morning in the summer Rangers put a tipi on the front lawn of the visitor center. Visitors are always welcome to help. Buffalo Hide Tipi Elder (Mylie Lawyer) sitting in front of Old Buffalo hide tipi. The only known remaining complete buffalo hide tipi belonging to a Nez Perce. Appaloosa Horse Parade Horses and riders dressed in native regalia. This horse parade was held in the Spalding picnic area during the parks 50th anniversary in 2015. Weippe Camas Blue Camas flowers in a prairie field. Camas has been a food staple of the Nez Perce for thousands of years. Spotted Knapweed on the Decline in Big Hole National Battlefield The dedicated efforts of National Park Service staff and the Northern Rocky Mountain Exotic Plant Management Team (EPMT) at Big Hole National Battlefield has resulted in the decline of an invasive plant that threatens park natural and cultural resources: the spotted knapweed. Jason Lyon sprays knapweed in Big Hole NHP. The Journey On May 14, 1804, the expedition was officially underway. The party numbered more than 45, and their ages ranged from 17 to 35, with an average age of 27. On July 30 the Corps set up camp near what would become Fort Atkinson, and shortly after Lewis and Clark had made contact with the Oto and Missouria. On August 3 they held the first formal meeting between representatives of the U.S. Government and western tribes. 1871 photo of Nez Perce tribal member in front of tipis The Return On March 23, 1806, the return trip began. They followed the Columbia River upstream and eventually bought some pack horses to carry their gear until they reached the Nez Perce to retrieve their horses. From May 14 to June 10 the Corps stayed at a camp as guests of the Nez Perce and waited for the snow to melt. 1954 stamp commemorating the lewis and clark expedition Bear Paw Battlefield How did Montana's Bear Paw Mountains get their name? Old Chief Joseph grave site Summer Speaker Series Shares Cultural Wisdom Gwen Carter shows visitors a tukes (digging stick) during her August 3, 2019 talk on Traditional Nez Perce Food Gathering. A Nez Perce elder holding a tukes (digging stick). Nez Perce National Historical Park Nez Perce National Historical Park encompasses land that has been home to the Nez Perce people for thousands of years. Lewis and Clark first encountered the Nez Perce in September 1805 on their westward journey. The Nez Perce had never seen Europeans until the Corps, when they - nearly starving - came out of the Bitterroot Mountains. The Corps would camp with the Nez Perce at Weippe Prairie. nez perce teepees on a plain Chief Twisted Hair The Corps of Discovery encountered the Nez Perce people in late September 1805. They were exhausted from the grueling trek over the Bitterroot Mountains and the sight of the friendly Nez Perce must have been somewhat comforting. Among the Nez Perce leaders who offered guidance was Walamottinin, or Twisted Hair. William Clark described him as “a Cheerful man with apparant siencerity.” statue of lewis and clark and the Nez Perce Camas Citizen Science Monitoring Program The Camas Citizen Science Monitoring Program was developed by the National Park Service Upper Columbia Basin Network (UCBN) Inventory and Monitoring Program in collaboration with Nez Perce National Historical Park. This project seeks to engage high school volunteers as "Citizen Scientists" in the long range scientific monitoring of camas lily populations. National Park Service staff on the ground examining a blooming camas lily NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Nez Perce National Historical Park, Montana, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] view of mountain ridges and smoke Cous Roots Early May was the time when the Nez Perce people dug cous roots. The Native people called it “shappelell,” and the men of the Corps thought the root resembled a small sweet potato. It’s also known as biscuitroot or desert parsley. The women and children of the tribe searched for cous roots on dry, rocky hillsides. As with most roots, they were careful not to harvest the largest one found – to make sure more cous grew the next year. plant with yellow flowers Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. Camas Restoration at Nez Perce National Historical Park Camas Restoration at Nez Perce National Historical Park Peace Medals Still in Existence One peace metal is known to be within the collection of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla near Pendleton, Oregon. In 1899, the newly formed Oregon Historical Society acquired one of the small medals Lewis and Clark had handed out nearly a century before. Although in poor shape, the Jefferson Peace Medal was one of the few surviving material reminders that the Corps of Discovery had passed through the Pacific Northwest. Color the Trail: Animals of Lewis and Clark Color the Trail: Animals features animals of the trail and their names in Chinuk Wawa, Lakota, Arikara, Shoshoni, Osage, Hidatsa, Blackfoot, Nimipuutimt, and Mandan. More than 65 tribes have a connection with the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. Download, print, and color the pages. color the trail graphic with lewis and clark national historic trail logo Tú·kes (digging sticks) of the Nez Perce This unique tool is virtually identical to one that William Clark described in his journals: “a Strong Stick of three feet and a half long Sharpened at the lower end and its upper inserted into a part of an Elks or buck’s horn which Serves as a handle…” It’s a digging stick or a tú·kes from the Nez Perce people. A smooth, slightly curved brown stick lies horizontally on a table. It has a short handle National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Nimiipuu Women Carry the Future on Their Backs  Mothers and grandmothers hold vital roles in the Nimiipuu, (pronounced Nee-me-poo) nation. The tribe is often referred to as the Nez Perce due to an early misconception by French fur traders that tribal members’ noses were pierced. The Nimiipuu mothers brought their children into the world and raised them to live off their abundant homelands of north-central Idaho.   A field of bright green grass with snow-capped mountains in the background. Light purple flowers

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