New River Gorge

National Park & Preserve - West Virginia

The New River Gorge National Park & Preserve protects the New River Gorge in southern West Virginia. The area stretches for 53 miles (85 km) from just downstream of Hinton to Hawks Nest State Park near Ansted. New River Gorge is also home to some of the country's best whitewater rafting. The focus of this rafting is in the New River Gorge from the Cunard put-in to the Fayette Station take-out.

maps

Official visitor map of New River Gorge National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).New River Gorge - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of New River Gorge National Park & Preserve (NP & PRES) in West Virginia. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/neri/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_River_Gorge_National_Park_and_Preserve The New River Gorge National Park & Preserve protects the New River Gorge in southern West Virginia. The area stretches for 53 miles (85 km) from just downstream of Hinton to Hawks Nest State Park near Ansted. New River Gorge is also home to some of the country's best whitewater rafting. The focus of this rafting is in the New River Gorge from the Cunard put-in to the Fayette Station take-out. A rugged, whitewater river flowing northward through deep canyons, the New River is among the oldest rivers on the continent. The park encompasses over 70,000 acres of land along the New River, is rich in cultural and natural history, and offers an abundance of scenic and recreational opportunities. To reach Park Headquarters take Route 19 North from Beckley to the Glen Jean exit. Upon exiting Rt 19, make an immediate left turn. At the next intersection, turn right. Park Headquarters will be straight ahead on the right. GPS Coordinates for Headquarters: 81.15587W, 37.92775N Canyon Rim Visitor Center Canyon Rim Visitor Center is one of the park's primary, year round visitor centers. It is located at the New River Gorge Bridge, just north of Fayetteville. Boardwalk trails provide fantastic views of the bridge and the gorge. The center features exhibits, information, park film, and a book store. Canyon Rim Visitor Center is located on U.S. Route 19, just north of Fayetteville, WV. U.S. Route 19 is easily reached from Interstates I-64 and I-79, as well as U.S. Route 60. GPS Coordinates: 38.07003 N, 81.07583 W Grandview Visitor Center The Grandview section of the park features include overlooks of the New River, a visitor center (open seasonally), five hiking trails, ranger-led walks and talks, summer outdoor dramas, and picnic areas with playgrounds. To reach Grandview from Beckley follow I-64 East five miles to Exit 129 B. From Lewisburg follow I-64 West forty miles to Exit 129. From either exit, turn right and follow Route 9 North six miles to Grandview. Sandstone Visitor Center Sandstone Visitor Center is one of the primary year-round visitor centers for the park. It is a green design building where visitors can learn about the park and the watershed through exhibits and a park film. The center also features a native plant garden, picnic areas, and book store. Thurmond Depot Visitor Center Thurmond Depot is a restored railroad depot located in the historic railroad town of Thurmond. The Thurmond Depot Visitor Center is located seven miles down State Route 25. Take the Glen Jean exit off U.S. Route 19 north of Beckley, and follow the signs to Thurmond. Army Camp Located on an unmarked dirt road, off Route 41 near Prince. Coming from Beckley, it is the first left after crossing the New River. There are 11 drive-in tent and RV sites, some with partial shade. Army Camp 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Army Camp campsite Campsite at Army Camp Army Camp campsite Campsite at Army Camp Army Camp campsite Campsite at Army Camp Army Camp river and montains A view of the New River at Army Camp Army Camp picnic tables Picnic area at Army Camp Brooklyn Campground Take Gatewood Road to the Cunard turnoff, between Oak Hill and Fayetteville. Turn, then go 1.8 miles, then follow signs to Cunard River Access. Bear right through the boat launch parking lot and continue upstream for a mile. Sites are on the left. There are four shaded walk-in sites and one drive-in site for tents only. Brooklyn Campground 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Brooklyn Campground campers sitting in front of tent Campers at Brooklyn Campground Burnwood Group Campsite Burnwood, located across Route 19 from Canyon Rim Visitor Center, offers group camping. Reservations are required. Burnwood Group Campsite 50.00 To reserve the campsite at Burnwood call (304) 465-6517. Burnwood Group Campsite 50.00 To reserve the group site at Burnwood call (304) 465-6517. Burnwood Group Campsite 50.00 To reserve the group site at Burnwood call (304) 465-6517. Burnwood Groups Site firepit and camp site fire pit at Burnwood Group Campground Burnwood Shelter octagonal picnic shelter Picnic shelter at Burnwood Dunglen Group Campsite The park has two camping areas available for group camping. One is located at Burnwood off U. S. Route 19 across from Canyon Rim Visitor Center. The other is located along the New River at Dunglen (across from Thurmond). Both of these sites require a Special Use Permit. For a permit for the group campsites, contact the permits office at 304-465-6517. Dunglen Group Campground 50.00 Group camping at Dunglen requires a Special Use Permit. For a permit for the group campsites, contact the permits office at 304-465-6517. Dunglen Group Campsite bulletin board and grassy field Group campsite at Dunglen Dunglen Group Campground grassy field surrounded by woods with river in background through trees Group campsite at Dunglen Picnic Shelter large picnic shelter Picnic shelter at the Dunglen Group Campground Glade Creek Campground Located at the end of Glade Creek Road, off Route 41 near Prince. Coming from Beckley, Glade Creek Road is a well-marked right hand turn before crossing the New River. Follow Glade Creek Road for six miles to the campground. There are six walk-in tent sites and five drive-in sites for tents or small-medium RVs. There is one accessible site. Glade Creek Campground 0.00 There are no fees for camping. Glade Creek Campground campsite Campsite at Glade Creek campground Glade Creek Campground campsite Campsite at Glade Creek Campground Glade Creek Campground walk in camping area Walk in camping area at Glade Creek Campground Glade Creek Campground campsite Campsite at Glade Creek Campground Glade Creek Campground restrooms Restrooms at Glade Creek campground Grandview Sandbar Located on Glade Creek Road, off Route 41 near Prince. Coming from Beckley, Glade Creek Road is a well-marked right hand turn just before crossing the New River. Follow the gravel Glade Creek for one mile, then turn let down a short winding road to the campground. There are 10 wooded sites for tents and small-medium sized RVs, 6 walk-in tents sites, and 2 accessible sites (with handicapped permit displayed) by the river. Grandview Sandbar 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Grandview Sandbar campsite Accessible Campsite at Grandview Sandbar Grandview Sandbar campsite Walk-in site at Grandview Sandbar Grandview Sandbar campsite Drive-in campsite at Grandview Sandbar Grandview Sandbar campground Grandview Sandbar Campground Grandview Sandbar restrooms Restrooms at Grandview Sandbar Grandview Sandbar river A view of the New River at Grandview Sandbar Campground. Meadow Creek Campground Meadow Creek Campground is a primitive campground located along the New River about one mile down the road from Sandstone Visitor Center. Exit Interstate 64 at exit 139 and drive north past Sandstone Visitor Center towards Meadow Creek. In about 1.5 miles turn left and cross the railroad tracks. Bear right and follow the road into the campground. This campground is not recommended for longer RVs. The railroad track crossing can be dangerous for longer RVs. camping 0.00 All campsites are free Meadow Creek Campground grassy open campground A view of Meadow Creek Campground Meadow Creek Campground entrance dirt road entering into large grassy campground The road into Meadow Creek Campground Stone Cliff Located off Route 25 near Thurmond. Six walk-in and one vehicle site. Camping Fee 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Stone Cliff Campground river and mountains with bridge View of the river from Stone Cliff Campground Stone Cliff Campground wooded campsite A walk-in campsite at Stone Cliff Campground Stone Cliff Campground sign campground sign Sign at entrance to Stone Cliff Campground Stone Cliff Campground campsite with fire ring A walk-in campsite at Stone Cliff Campground Thayer Campground Thayer has 4 walk-in sites upstream from the Slater Creek Crossing. Alcohol is prohibited. Take Route 25 from Glen Jean for six miles towards Thurmond. Turn right at the intersection just before the bridge across the river and continue towards Stone Cliff. At Stone Cliff, cross the New River bridge and continue upstream on Route 25 (which becomes unpaved at this point) towards Thayer. At Thayer Church, turn downhill off Route 25 to the bottom. Cross the railroad tracks and turn left towards the campground. Thayer Campground 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. Thayer Campground campsite Thayer Campground War Ridge/Backus Mountain Campground This is the only campground in the park that is not along the river. It is located on a ridgetop. From Beckley, take Highway 41 to McCreery, cross the river, and continue towards Danese. Turn right onto Backus Mountain Road, drive approximately 1 1/2 miles and turn right at the gravel road (SR 22/7). The campground is on your right approximately 1/2 mile off Backus Road. There are eight drive-in sites for tents or small RVs. War Ridge Campground 0.00 These primitive camping areas have no drinking water or hookups, and limited restroom facilities. All sites are managed on a first-come, first-served basis and reservations are not accepted. There are no fees for camping. War Ridge Campground campground with fog War Ridge Campground War Ridge Campground campground War Ridge Campground War Ridge Campground campground War Ridge Campground Sunrise at Diamond Point sun rising over the New River Gorge Sun rising over the New River Gorge from Diamond Point on the Endless Wall Trail. New River Gorge Bridge bridge spanning the river The New River Gorge Bridge spans across the New River. Horseshoe Bend from Grandview bend in the river The Horseshoe Bend in the New River from Grandview Thurmond Depot railroad tracks and depot Thurmond Depot Sandstone Falls waterfall spanning the river Sandstone Falls spans the New River Foggy morning fog and mountains Fog settles in the gorge Rhododendron at Turkey Spur pink rhododendron and view of the gorge and river View from Turkey Spur at Grandview Waterfall on Dowdy Creek waterfall and stream Waterfall on Dowdy Creek Riverscour Prairies Love Whitewater Too... The word “prairie” usually conjures images of herds of bison, rolling hills of grass waving in the wind, maybe a covered wagon and a little house. While the prairies along the New and Gauley Rivers are much smaller in size, they contain the same tall prairie grasses as found in the Midwest. They also harbor many rare plant species. The Eastern Rivers & Mountains Network collects information on the condition of riverscour prairies and how they are changing over time. Two people collecting data from a riverscour prairie vegetation monitoring plot Prescribed Fire Used to Promote Native Grasses and Understand Effects of Fire and Deer Browsing on Oak Regeneration Today’s wildland firefighters are practitioners of sound science. They rely on data gathered from research and past experience to make informed decisions when suppressing wildfires and conducting prescribed fires. Wildland Fire and Aviation firefighters in the Northeast Region (NER) are no different and they are starting the 2017 spring fire season off with a bang. A fireman walks through a controlled burn, holding a driptorch. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—New River Gorge National River, West Virginia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] rock outcrop and trees NPS Participates in World Scout Jamboree Rangers from eight parks around the country traveled to New River Gorge National River to work alongside New River Gorge NR staff at the 24th World Scout Jamboree, July 22 – August 2, 2019, at the Summit Bechtel Reserve (SBR) in West Virginia, a site which borders the park. Approximately 45,000 Scouts from 157 different countries attended the event that was jointly hosted by Scouts Canada, Asociación de Scouts de México, and the Boy Scouts of America. The Future of Our Oak Forests: Can Fire and Fences Sustain Oak Forests for the Future? Oak-dominated forests are an important resource in the Appalachian Mountains, covering vast areas of the dry ridgetops and mesic hillsides. However, the future of these forests is uncertain due to the lack of regeneration that would form the future oak trees. Person crouched beside a forest health monitoring plot, recording data Bat Population Monitoring at New River Gorge National River New River Gorge National River protects over 70,000 acres of land along the New River. A diverse suite of natural resources can be found in the park, including several rare species of bats. For over a decade, biologists have been studying how park bat populations are changing. Since the introduction of white nose syndrome, several bat species have dramatically declined. A state-endangered little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus). Seeing the Forest and the Trees: Monitoring Program Yields Insights into Forest Health in Bluestone, Gauley River, and New River Gorge Within the New River Gorge National River, Gauley River National Recreation Area, and Bluestone National Scenic River, understanding the current condition of park forests and how the forests are changing is critical to long-term management of park ecosystems. One reason that monitoring forest health is so important—the forests are constantly changing. Storms, pests, pathogens, drought, and new species all play a role in shaping the forest. Forests lining the slopes and ridgetops in New River Gorge Forest Health in a Regional Context Eight Inventory and Monitoring networks have been collaborating on forest health monitoring since 2005. Participants include 61 national parks in the eastern United States. As a result of this collaboration, vegetation data are collected in similar ways, which allows us to compare various parks across the region. One person on the forest floor collecting data, while another records the data So Many Mushrooms! It started as a personal project. Biological technician Sarah Daugherty would be out collecting data for the Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network’s forest health monitoring program, and notice so many cool mushrooms. She started taking photos and jotting down what she saw. Soon, she noticed that many of the species she was finding weren't on park species lists. Discussing her discoveries with her colleagues, everyone agreed that a more formal fungi inventory was in order. Mushrooms of different colors, shapes, and sizes, laid out next to each other on a floor Silent Witnesses, Old Trees are Hiding in Our Midst An article about old trees in Eastern Rivers and Mountains Network (ERMN) parks. ERMN scientists have collected cores from two "average" looking canopy trees adjacent to every permanent long-term forest health monitoring plot in network parks. Of the 700 trees cored, over 60 of them hovered near 200 years old. A woman uses an increment borer to take a core sample from a tree. 2019 Weather In Review: New River Gorge National River In 2019, the park experienced near record-setting temperatures, and it was the 2nd warmest year since 1895. In contrast, it was a near-normal year for precipitation. A view of fall foliage and the New River form a high overlook. Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Mississippian Period—358.9 to 323.2 MYA The extensive caves of Mammoth Cave and Wind Cave national parks developed in limestone deposited during the Mississippian. Warm, shallow seas covered much of North America, which was close to the equator. fossil crinoid Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix 2020 Weather In Review: New River Gorge National Park and Preserve New River Gorge National Park and Preserve had a very warm and very wet 2020. The year ended as the 10th warmest and 4th wettest recorded since 1895. An view from an overlook of fall foliage and the New River. All Hope is Not Lost – Parks plan strategically to treat invasive plants Managing invasive plant species can seem like an endless and insurmountable challenge, but parks are using a new strategic collaborative tool to protect their most valuable resources. Four photos show invasive plants spreading over an area during 12 years Plan Like a Park Ranger: Top 10 Tips for visiting New River Gorge Check in with a ranger for our top 10 tips for visiting New River Gorge National Park and Preserve. close up of park ranger Protecting Oak Forests in National Parks New River Gorge National Park and Preserve is experimenting with ways to protect the next generation of oak forests using fire and fences at two mountaintop sites in the park. More tree seedlings and plants grow inside a deer exclosure fence than outside the fence. Grandview shelters & picnic area receive makeover The park received $280,000 in funding from the Great American Outdoors Act to address long deferred maintenance on the historic Grandview shelters and picnic area. NPS Historic Preservation Training Center, Park, and AmeriCorps Members working.

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