"Climber in Wilderness" by NPS Photo/Cori Oakes , public domain

North Cascades

National Park - Washington

North Cascades National Park is in northern Washington State. It’s a vast wilderness of conifer-clad mountains, glaciers and lakes. The North Cascades Highway passes viewpoints and leads to trails such as the steep Thunder Creek Trail. Boats dot Ross Lake. The remote community of Stehekin lies at the northern tip of deep Lake Chelan. The park shelters grizzly bears and gray wolves, plus more than 200 bird species.

maps

Official visitor map of North Cascades National Park (NP) in Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).North Cascades - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of North Cascades National Park (NP) in Washington. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Skykomish Ranger District in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest (NF) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie MVUM - Skykomish 2021

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Skykomish Ranger District in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest (NF) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Mt. Baker Ranger District in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest (NF) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie MVUM - Mt. Baker 2020

Motor Vehicle Use Map (MVUM) of Mt. Baker Ranger District in Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest (NF) in Washington. Published by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS).

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).Washington State - Highway Map

Map of Washington State Highways / Tourist Map. Published by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/noca/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Cascades_National_Park North Cascades National Park is in northern Washington State. It’s a vast wilderness of conifer-clad mountains, glaciers and lakes. The North Cascades Highway passes viewpoints and leads to trails such as the steep Thunder Creek Trail. Boats dot Ross Lake. The remote community of Stehekin lies at the northern tip of deep Lake Chelan. The park shelters grizzly bears and gray wolves, plus more than 200 bird species. Less than three hours from Seattle, an alpine landscape beckons. Discover communities of life adapted to moisture in the west and recurring fire in the east. Explore jagged peaks crowned by more than 300 glaciers. Listen to cascading waters in forested valleys. Witness a landscape sensitive to the Earth's changing climate. Help steward the ecological heart of the Cascades. Access to North Cascades National Park and Ross Lake National Recreation Area is from the State Route 20 corridor. SR 20 (North Cascades Highway) connects with Interstate 5 (Exit 230) at Burlington. From the east, the highway intersects with US 97 at Okanogan and with SR 153 at Twisp. The State Department of Transportation closes a portion of the road between Ross Dam Trailhead and Lone Fir Campground in winter. The Lake Chelan National Recreation Area (Stehekin) is accessible by ferry or plane from Chelan. Golden West Visitor Center Note: During the summer 2021 season, rangers are available at Stehekin Landing for information during boat times. Visitor Center located short walk from the passenger ferry landing at Stehekin Landing inside what was the historic Golden West Lodge. Exhibits: Relief map and natural and cultural history of the area. Arts & Humanities of Stehekin operates the Golden West Gallery, featuring local art and crafts. Facilities: Information desk, bookstore. Audiovisual program. Summer ranger programs offered. A short walk from the passenger ferry landing at Stehekin Landing at the north end of 50-mile long Lake Chelan. Reached via passenger ferry, trail, or float plane. Not accessible by road/vehicle. North Cascades National Park Service Complex Headquarters and Public Information Center The North Cascades National Park Service Complex Headquarters and Public Information Center is five miles east of I-5 in Burlington and 46 miles west of the North Cascades National Park Service Complex boundary. It is operated jointly with the Mt. Baker District of the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest and North Cascades Institute. Exhibits: Relief map of the park and adjacent national forests. Available Facilities: Information desk. Sales area with books, maps, videos, and other items. Located at 810 Moore Street (State Route 20) in Sedro-Woolley, the North Cascades National Park Service Complex Headquarters and Public Information Center is five miles east of I-5 in Burlington and approximately 46 miles west of North Cascades National Park Complex boundary. North Cascades Visitor Center Location: Across the Skagit River from the North Cascades Highway (State Route 20) near milepost 120 and the town of Newhalem. Adjacent to Newhalem Creek Campground. Exhibits: Relief map of the park and surrounding area, exhibit room featuring multimedia exhibits on the park's natural and cultural history. Available Facilities: Theater featuring large format slide program and video presentation. Several short, accessible interpretive trails and restrooms. Information desk. Bookstore. North Cascades Visitor Center is located off North Cascades Highway (State Route 20) in Newhalem, Washington, just behind Newhalem Creek Campground. Newhalem is 59 miles east of I-5 in Burlington and 72 miles west of Winthrop. Wilderness Information Center The Wilderness Information Center is the main backcountry permit office for North Cascades National Park and the adjacent Ross Lake and Lake Chelan National Recreation Areas. Backcountry permits are required for overnights in the park year-round and are available at an outdoor self-issue station when the center is closed during the winter season. Information desk. Sales area with books, maps, videos, and other items related to the national park and adjacent national forests. Drive State Route 20 toward Marblemount. Turn onto Ranger Station Road, which leaves State Route 20 at milepost 105.3, just west of Marblemount, and drive 0.7 miles to the complex at the end of the road. The Wilderness Information Center is on the right. Colonial Creek North Campground Camp in old growth forest at the base of the impressively glaciated Colonial Peak on the shore of Diablo Lake. Elevation 1200'. Located north of Highway 20. Reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance at www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Recreational Opportunities include a fully accessible fishing pier and boat launch on Diablo Lake, as well as hiking opportunities for various abilities on Thunder Creek and Thunder Knob trails. Colonial Creek Summer Fees 24.00 Reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance at www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Check out time is 12:00 noon. Colonial Creek CG Winter Fees 0.00 Colonial Creek South campsites 64-73 are open during winter months with no water, services, or fees. Vault toilets available. Please carry out all trash. Snow may be on the ground during winter months. Colonial Creek Campground Group Site 75.00 $30/night. First-come, first-served. No reservations. Check out time 12:00 noon. Capacity: 1 group site (site 110), maximum occupancy of 20 people. Fees and Reservations: $30/night. First-come, first-served. No reservations. Check out time 12:00 noon. Facilities and Services: Dump station, flush toilets, garbage and recycling service and potable water available. No hook-ups or showers. Gathering firewood prohibited. Firewood can be purchased outside of the park. Colonial Creek North Campground A forested campsite with a picnic table, tent pad, and bear box. A campsite in Colonial Creek North Campground. Colonial Creek South Campground Ten walk-in, tent-only sites available first-come, first-served in the winter. Camp in old growth forest at the base of glaciated Colonial Peak on the shore of Diablo Lake. Elevation 1200'. Located south of Highway 20. Reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance at www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Recreational opportunities include a fully accessible fishing pier and boat launch on Diablo Lake, as well as hiking opportunities on Thunder Creek and Thunder Knob trails. Colonial Creek Summer Fees 24.00 Reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance at www.recreation.gov or call 1-877-444-6777. Check out time is 12:00 noon. Winter - no fees Colonial Creek CG Winter Fees 0.00 Sites 64-73 open during winter months with no water, services, or fees. Vault toilets available. Please carry out all trash. Snow may be on ground during winter months. Colonial Creek Campground Group Site 75.00 Fees and Reservations: $75/night. Reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance at www.recreation.gov or call 1-877-444-6777. Capacity: 1 group site (site 110), maximum occupancy of 20 people. Facilities and Services: Dump station, flush toilets, garbage and recycling service and potable water available. No hook-ups or showers. Gathering firewood prohibited. Firewood can be purchased outside of the park. Colonial Creek Campground Wooden campground sign in front of a cabin. Entrance station for Colonial Creek Campground on Diablo Lake. Goodell Creek Campground Goodell Creek Campground (elevation 500') is situated in lush, old growth forest on the banks of the Skagit River. Campsites are suitable for tents and small RVs. First-come, first-served during the winter; summer reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance through www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Recreational opportunities include a raft/kayak launch on the Skagit River and fishing on the Skagit and its tributaries. Goodell Creek Campground Summer Fees 20.00 Fee is per site per night, and includes a maximum of 2 vehicles, 8 people, and 3 tents. Fee also includes service charge from Recreation.gov reservation system. Check out time is 12:00 noon. Goodell Creek Campground Winter Fees 0.00 Goodell Creek Campground is free from mid-September to Memorial Day weekend, when water and trash services are stopped. Vault toilet available. Goodell Creek Campground A picnic shelter next to a river Picnic shelter and boat launch area at Goodell Creek Campground Gorge Lake Campground Gorge Lake Campground (elevation 900') is located on the bank of Gorge Lake, next to the cascading Stetattle Creek. Primitive camp with no water. First-come, first-served during the winter. Summer reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance at www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Recreational opportunities include a boat launch on Gorge Lake, fishing, and nearby hiking trails. Gorge Lake Campground 20.00 Reserve sites 3-180 days in advance online at www.recreation.gov or by phone at 1-877-444-6777. Check out time noon. Primitive camp with no water. Vault toilets. Recycling and trash collection late May-early September. Gathering firewood is prohibited. Firewood is available outside the park. Gorge Lake Campground An empty campsite in the forest. A small campground on the edge of Gorge Lake Harlequin Campground Harlequin Campground is located near Stehekin in Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, 4.5 miles up the Stehekin Valley Rd from Stehekin Landing and 0.5 miles from the public airstrip. All sites are walk-in sites though some have limited parking. First-come, first-served during the winter; summer reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance through www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Stehekin is a remote community with limited facilities and is only accessible by foot, boat, or plane. Harlequin Campground Peak Season Fees 20.00 Fee is per site per night, and includes a maximum 8 people (note that some sites can only fit one tent). Fee also includes service charge from Recreation.gov reservation system. Harlequin Campground Non-peak Season Fees 0.00 Harlequin Campground is free and first-come, first-served from mid-September to late June. There is no trash services during the non-peak season. Vault toilet available. Harlequin Campground An open sunny forest near a green river. Harlequin Campground, located near the Stehekin River, 4.5 miles from Stehekin Landing. Hozomeen Campground Hozomeen Campground is located at the north end of Ross Lake and is open from late May through October. There is no camping fee, and all sites are first-come, first-served. Facilities include boat launches, pit toilets, potable water, picnic tables and fire grates. Guests must pack-out all trash. Campsites located in the Upper Loop are closed until further notice due to hazard trees. Hozomeen Campground Fees 0.00 There is no camping fee. Hozomeen Campground A wooded campsite with a picnic table and fire pit Hozomeen Campground Lakeview Campground Located at the head of Lake Chelan, Lakeview Campground is a five minute walk from the boat dock at Stehekin Landing. All sites are walk-in sites for small to medium-sized tents. First-come, first-served during the winter; summer reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance through www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Stehekin is a remote community with limited facilities and is only accessible by foot, boat, or plane. Lakeview Campground Peak Season Fees 20.00 Fee is per site per night, and includes a maximum 8 people (note that some sites can only fit one tent). Fee also includes service charge from Recreation.gov reservation system. Lakeview Campground Non-peak Season Fees 0.00 Lakeview Campground is free and first-come, first-served from mid-September to late May. There is no water or trash services during the non-peak season. Vault toilet available. Lakeview Campground An open sunny forest surrounds small campsites with picnic tables The lower section (sites 1 - 5) of Lakeview Campground, looking north. Newhalem Creek Campground Newhalem Creek Campground (elevation 500') is conveniently located between the town of Newhalem and the North Cascades Visitor Center on the banks of the Skagit River. Some sites are suitable for small to mid-size RVs. Reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance at www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Recreational opportunities include several short walks and interpretive trails, nearby natural and historic destinations, and fishing on the Skagit River. Newhalem Creek Campground Reservation Fee 24.00 Fee is per site per night, and includes a maximum of 2 vehicles, 8 people, and 3 tents. Fee also includes service charge from Recreation.gov reservation system. Check out time is 12:00 noon. Closed in winter. Newhalem Creek Group Campsites 75.00 Reservations through recreation.gov or call 877-444-6777; first-come, first-serve, if available. Maximum of 25 people per site. Potable water, dump station, garbage/recycling service, and flush toilets provided. No showers or hook-ups. Each site has a covered pavilion with picnic tables and barbecue grill. Gathering firewood is prohibited. Firewood is available outside the park. Closed in winter. Newhalem Campground Benches in a forested amphitheater Newhalem Creek Campground amphitheater Purple Point Campground Located at the head of Lake Chelan, Purple Point Campground is a ten minute walk from the boat dock at Stehekin Landing. All sites are walk-in sites for small to medium-sized tents. First-come, first-served during the winter; summer reservations can be made up to 6 months in advance through www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Stehekin is a remote community with limited facilities and is only accessible by foot, boat, or plane. Purple Point Campground Peak Season Fees 20.00 Fee is per site per night, and includes a maximum 8 people (note that some sites can only fit one tent). Fee also includes service charge from Recreation.gov reservation system. Purple Point Non-peak Season Fees 0.00 Purple Point Campground is free and first-come, first-served from mid-September to late May. There is no water or trash services during the non-peak season. Vault toilet available. Purple Point Campground A wooden picnic table at a campsite overlooks a paved road, large lake, and distant mountains. The sites at Purple Point Campground sit near the Stehekin Valley Road and Lake Chelan Upper and Lower Goodell Creek Group Campgrounds Each group site has tent pads, a pavilion with picnic tables, and a fire grate. Maximum capacity for Upper Goodell is 30 people (10 vehicles) and Lower Goodell is 50 people (20 vehicles). Reservations can be made 3-360 days in advance at www.recreation.gov or by calling 1-877-444-6777. Lower Goodell sites can accommodate RV's. Vault toilet and garbage service provided; no hook-ups or potable water. Gathering firewood is prohibited. Firewood is available outside the park. Upper and Lower Goodell Creek Group Campgrounds - Summer Fees 75.00 Reserve sites 3-360 days in advance at Recreation.gov or by phone at 1-877-444-6777 for $75. Upper and Lower Goodell Creek Group Campgrounds - Winter Fees 0.00 Closed for winter season Lower Goodell Group Campsite A sheltered picnic area in the forest Upper and Lower Goodell Campgrounds can accommodate large groups. Stehekin - Looking down Lake Chelan boats on the water with mountains and trees surrounding Stehekin sits at the top of Lake Chelan, welcoming visitors to take a life at a slower pace. Camping on Ross Lake Tents set up in a wooded area. Grab your tent, your sleeping bag, and adventurous soul and camp along Ross Lake. Pelton Basin from Cascade Pass Trees surround the frame with glacier and mountains in the background Let the wow factor exceed your expectations while hiking Cascade Pass. Backpack the North Cascades Person with backpacking and climbing gear hikes on a trail. Explore the trails and backcountry camping and climbing in a landscape over 9,000 feet of vertical relief. Jagged Mountain Peaks Jagged mountain peaks give way to glaciers. Explore jagged peaks crowned by more than 300 glaciers as you traverse the landscape. High Elevation Archeological Survey in Pacific Northwest Mountain Ranges Long before boundaries of national parks were established, Native Americans traveled widely in the mountain ranges of the Pacific Northwest. Archeologists had little information about where people hunted, harvested, and camped and decided to survey for sites in the high altitude regions of Olympic, Mount Rainier, and North Cascades National Parks. Surprising survey results reveal extended use of high altitude areas in prehistoric times. [photo] Two men in discussion atop mountain. 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Recipients of the 2014 NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Climate Adaptation: Adapting Road and Trail Infrastructure to Changing Hydrologic Flows Climate models project average warming in the Pacific Northwest of 2.1 °C by the 2040s and 3.8 °C by the 2080s. Warmer temperatures will influence precipitation patterns in the northern Cascades by shifting many watersheds from snow to rain dominated systems. These shifts will result in more autumn/winter floods, higher peak flows, and lower summer flows. People with heavy equipment looking out over a washed out section of road Glacier Monitoring in the National Parks of Washington State: A virtual field experience. Increasing public awareness of Glacial resources in the North Coast / Cascades National Parks Virtual reality is being investigated as a means of providing the average visitor and the public with the experience of glaciers and glacier research. Monitoring the Health of Whitebark Pine Populations Whitebark pine is a five-needle pine that grows in high-elevation ecosystems in Western North America. It can be found in three national parks within the North Coast and Cascades Network. Today, its long-term survival is threatened by an introduced fungus, blister rust, and the native mountain pine beetle. To better understand how to protect the trees, the Network established study plots in eight stands in Mount Rainier and five stands in North Cascades in 2004. Person measuring a stand of whitebark pine and subalpine fir trees Cascades Butterfly Project Butterfly abundances and plant flowering patterns are sensitive indicators of changing climates. The Cascades Butterfly Project is a long-term monitoring program where citizen scientists (volunteers) and National Park Service Biologists monitor subalpine butterflies and plant phenology. Person examining a captured butterfly in the field Climate Change and Long-term Trends in Bald Eagle Winter Habitat Use on the Skagit River Bald eagle winter use of the Skagit River is declining and is closely linked to the timing and presence of chum salmon and flood events, which have changed markedly over the last 40 years. Bald eagle standing over a fish carcass at a river's edge Sensitivity of Marmots and Pikas to Weather Anomalies Associated with Climate Change Hoary marmots and American pikas are locally declining in response to climate driven changes in moisture, snowpack duration, warming temperatures, and cold exposure. Two marmots, one larger and one smaller, look out from behind a rock Butterflies of the North Coast & Cascades A comprehensive list of butterfly species found in Mount Rainier National Park, North Cascades National Park Complex, Olympic National Park, and San Juan Island National Historical Park. Brightly colored Milbert's tortoiseshell on the ground Washington Fisher Restoration Fishers, a member of the weasel family, are being reintroduced to Washington State. A fisher, a medium-sized mammal with brown fur. Timelapse Video of Night Sky Camera Set Up Silent timelapse video shows night sky specialists with the NPS Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division installing a custom CCD camera for measuring light conditions of the night sky. Timelapse video shows people installing a camera and tripod against a naturally dark night sky. North Coast and Cascades Network Exotic Plant Management Team The North Coast and Cascades Network Exotic Plant Management Team (NCCN EPMT) manages a diverse array of exotic plants across the dramatic landscapes of the Pacific Northwest. The team works with partner parks and agencies to augment vegetation management across the network. People loading weed control equipment into the back of a vehicle Moths of the North Coast & Cascades Moths are insects and members of the taxonomic order of Lepidoptera. They and their larvae provide food for other insects, fish, and animals, and they are pollinators for many nocturnally flowering plants. Over the last five years, parks in the North Coast and Cascades Network have conducted Bioblitzes to begin developing species lists of moths in our parks. Scribe moth specimen What’s That Buzz? Documenting Pollinator Diversity in North Cascades and Olympic National Parks Most flowering plants rely on insect pollinators for successful reproduction. Thus many plant-feeding animals (like bears, goats, elk) are also dependent on insect pollinators for their well-being. Still, park scientists know relatively little about the diversity of native insect pollinators. We designed a study to document the diversity of two very important groups of insect pollinators in North Cascades and Olympic National Parks: bees and flower flies. Side view of a yellowhead bumble bee specimen with a substantial pollen load on its hind leg Nitrogen Deposition in the North Coast and Cascades Nitrogen deposition is a widely an unknown yet poignant issue in the west. Studies at Mount Rainier National Park, Olympic National Park, and North Cascades National Park are investigating effects on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Effects of Nitrogen Deposition on High Alpine Lakes in North Coast and Cascades Parks Remote high alpine lakes are sensitive indicators of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition. Anthropogenic N deposition has potential to change species composition and ecosystem function in alpine lakes. Alpine lake surrounded by mountains. Historic Visibility Studies in National Parks Haze can negatively impact how well people can see and appreciate our national parks across the country. This article summarizes the visibility studies from the 1980s, 1990s and 2000s aimed at identifying the sources of haze causing pollution at specific parks and improving visibility monitoring methods. Big bend national park river Understanding Mercury Concentrations in Mountain Lake Fish Mountain lakes may seem pristine, but they are subjected to multiple types of man-made stressors. Since the industrial revolution, toxins from industrial activities have begun to travel through the atmosphere and be deposited onto the mountain landscape, where lakes act as collection basins. This study sought to determine the range of mercury concentrations in mountain lake fish, and to understand which variables contribute to high mercury in fish. Researcher in an inflatable boat on a sparkling mountain lake Measuring light pollution across a landscape It takes a special camera to take a special picture—forty-five images in the case of a customized camera used by the National Park Service to document night sky quality. NPS scientists with the Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division (NSNSD) discussed the camera—how it works, what the images reveal, why it is important, and how it advances the NPS mission. Sweeping valley view from a mountain w/clouds and a female scientist installing the NPS camera. Park Air Profiles - North Cascades National Park Air quality profile for North Cascades National Park. Gives park-specific information about air quality and air pollution impacts for North Cascades NP as well as the studies and monitoring conducted for North Cascades NP. Lupine flowers on Sahale Arm Effects of Balsam Woolly Adelgid on True Firs in a Changing Climate In about 1900, a tiny insect called balsam woolly adelgid, a European native, appeared in North America on balsam firs. It can now be found in the West as well, in British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California. In Mount Rainier and North Cascades National Parks, infestations have been found on subalpine fir and Pacific silver fir, but subalpine fir is more heavily damaged. Swollen tip of a fir branch indicating balsam woolly adelgid infestation. Bees of the North Coast & Cascades Bees are some of the most abundant and important pollinators in the world – especially in mountainous environments. Despite the importance of bees in our natural environments, many national parks do not know what species live within their boundaries. In 2016, to celebrate the Centennial of the National Park Service, North Coast and Cascades national parks focused on inventories of pollinators, including bees. Macro photo of the metallic blue head of a mason bee Glacier Monitoring in North Coast & Cascades Parks The North Coast and Cascades Network currently contains 485 glaciers that are iconic features of the region, and vital components of the parks hydrology and ecosystems. The remains of Banded Glacier in 2016 Effects of Nitrogen Deposition on High Alpine Meadows in North Coast and Cascades Parks Alpine plant communities are limited by nitrogen (N) because they have evolved in ecosystems with naturally low levels of reactive N. Increased N deposition is projected to alter plant communities, soil processes, soil carbon and N storage. An alpine meadow in bloom with mountains in the background. Modeling climate change effects on the hydrology of North Cascades wetland ecosystems Through field research and modeling, this study examines the effects of climate change on mountain wetlands and the fauna, like amphibians, that are dependent on those habitats. Wildland Fire in Douglas Fir: Western United States Douglas fir is widely distributed throughout the western United States, as well as southern British Columbia and northern Mexico. Douglas fir is able to survive without fire, its abundantly-produced seeds are lightweight and winged, allowing the wind to carry them to new locations where seedlings can be established. Close-up of Douglas fir bark and needles. Recipe for Mountain Lake Conservation After a long hike through the mountains, nothing compares to the inspiring beauty of a healthy, colorful mountain lake. But airborne nitrogen pollution threatens the health and function of these alpine oases. man sits by mountain lake NPS Geodiversity Atlas—North Cascades National Park, Washington Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] mountain pass Syrphid Flies of the North Coast & Cascades Syrphid flies, also known as hoverflies or flower flies, feed on nectar or pollen and are frequently observed on flowers in subalpine and alpine ecosystems. However, there is little research on their distribution or importance as pollinators. In 2014, Dr. Jessica Rykken conducted pollinator surveys in Olympic National Park and North Cascades National Park Service Complex, and documented 57 taxa of syrphid flies. A syrphid fly with yellow and black coloration similar to that of a wasp Walking With Wildflowers: Monitoring Pacific Crest Trail Plant Communities as Climate Changes Walking with Wildflowers is a citizen science program dedicated to monitoring plant phenology along the Pacific Crest Trail using observations from hikers and backpackers. Its main goal is to determine whether plant species are able to respond to changing climatic conditions and better understand how plants use seasonal cues to time flowering. Trail through a meadow surrounded by trees, with mountains beyond 1997–1998 El Niño / 1998–1999 La Niña Wind-driven waves and abnormally high sea levels contributed to hundreds of millions of dollars in flood and storm damage in the San Francisco Bay region, including Point Reyes National Seashore, Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and Pinnacles National Monument. In addition to California, the 1997–1998 El Niño and the following 1998–1999 La Niña severely impacted the Pacific Northwest, including many National Park System units. colorful ocean surface mapping image Wildland Fire in Ponderosa Pine: Western United States This forest community generally exists in areas with annual rainfall of 25 inches or less. Extensive pure stands of this forest type are found in the southwestern U.S., central Washington and Oregon, southern Idaho and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Recently burned ponderosa pine forest. History of the Panoramic Lookout Project Most documentation of the panoramic lookout photos project, which began about 1930 to document areas seen from the lookout system, comes from the US Forest Service. The NPS project began in 1934. Lester Moe worked for the Forest Service taking photos in 1933 and 1934, and later worked for NPS. Several innovations came about from this project: the Osborne photo-recording transit and “special emulsion infra-red sensitive film” not affected by smoke and haze. sample of the panoramic lookout project Student Journal: Tracking Lichen to Assess Air Quality at North Cascades National Park Lichen play an important role in keeping forested ecosystems healthy by providing food, shelter, and nesting material to animals, retaining moisture from the atmosphere, and trapping nutrients from the air. Lichen can also help us understand the air quality in a forest. Join student intern Kelly McCoy as she assists a field crew collecting lichen samples in remote areas in North Cascades National Park. View of snow-capped mountains along a river on a partly cloudy day. National Park Service Fire Management Staff Assist with Wildfire Response in Australia In the northern hemisphere winter of 2019-2020, twenty National Park Service employees responded to the call for assistance with wildfires in Australia. They had a great experience, and brought home some important lessons and lifelong memories. A group of men and women hold the United States and Australian flags. Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits How are Landbird Populations Doing in the North Coast and Cascades Network? Landbirds are one of the vital signs monitored in five national parks of the North Coast and Cascades Network. Two recent studies show that for species with discernible trends, most populations are stable or even increasing. A greenish-yellow bird singing from a perch Bat Projects in Parks: North Coast Cascades Network Eleven bat species occur in North Coast Cascades Network Parks. Each species is unique, except that they're all facing threats of some kind in their environments. Learn more about how scientists study bats and what you can do to help. Is the Fate of Whitebark Pine in the Beak of Clark's Nutcracker? Clark’s nutcrackers favor the seeds of whitebark pines, which they cache in great numbers. Whitebark pines are largely dependent on nutcrackers for seed dispersal; many cached seeds are not retrieved and go on to germinate. The tree is in decline due to native bark beetles, a non-native fungus, and climate change. Will the bird turn to other food sources? A recent study analyzes data on both species from the Cascades and Sierra to understand the risk to this mutualism. Gray and black bird with beak open perched in a conifer Buckner Homestead Historic District Cultural Landscape The Buckner Homestead Historic District expresses the history of early settlement and agricultural development in the North Cascades. Originally home to William Buzzard, the remote area later served as the home and commercial orchard of the Buckner family. The orchard, buildings, roads, and other features that remain on the property still reflect the homestead's historic organization and use. Dirt tire tracks lead past a wood and stone cabin to a garage on the right Series: Panoramic Project Shows How National Parks Change Over Time In the 1930s, panoramic photographs were taken from lookout points. Comparing these images to present-day photographs allows us to understand change over time. Viewing photographs of different eras in the national parks can give many insights on ecosystem processes, as well as simply change over time. The panoramic lookout photographs provide a window on the past and an opportunity to compare to the present with changes to landforms and land cover. Lester Moe documenting park landscapes in the 1930s Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: NPS Environmental Achievement Awards Since 2002, the National Park Service (NPS) has awarded Environmental Achievement (EA) Awards to recognize staff and partners in the area of environmental preservation, protection and stewardship. A vehicle charges at an Electric Vehicle charging station at Thomas Edison National Historical Park Series: Coastal Geomorphology—Storms of Record Storms can bring about significant coastal change as well as substantial economic damage and loss in the human environment. Read about a few storms of interest that have since made history due to their unique intensity, characteristics, or impacts. aerial view of a major storm along the northwest coast of the united states and canada Series: Park Air Profiles Clean air matters for national parks around the country. Photo of clouds above the Grand Canyon, AZ Data Manager Profile: Kristen Bonebrake Meet Kristen Bonebrake, Data Manager for the North Coast and Cascades Network Inventory & Monitoring Network, and discover the important role that data managers play in protecting the natural resources of our parks! Explore Kristen's journey—from counting roadkill as an intern at Saguaro National Park, to collaborating with bright minds around the country to solve the complex challenges facing our nation's most special places. Kristen kneels on a rock in front of a dramatic snow-capped mountain scene. From Experiment to Ornament: Northern Red Oak at Marblemount Ranger Station The presence of a solitary northern red oak tree in a ranger station may seem unremarkable at first glance, but this tree has a unique role in conveying the history of North Cascades National Park and has special value to the community. A mature northern red oak stands tall in an open turf meadow. Listening for Owls: A Multi-agency Collaboration to Preserve Spotted Owl Habitat Across the West For over 25 years, biologists from the National Park Service and several other agencies have collected spotted owl monitoring data to inform forest management that is guided by the multi-agency Northwest Forest Plan. Yet traditional field surveys for spotted owls have become less effective as their numbers have dwindled. Thus in 2021, the Northwest Forest Plan’s spotted owl monitoring design is transitioning to remote acoustic monitoring (also known as passive monitoring). Audio recording unit, with microphones on either side, mounted on a tree trunk. Top Ten Tips: Know Before You Go Park rangers share their insider tips for visiting North Cascades National Park Service Complex. Check out the top 10 list to get the most out of your summer vacation. A person paddles in a canoe on a blue lake. Edwin Torres: A Native Plant Propagation Assistant Meet Edwin Torres, a Native Plant Propagation Assistant at North Cascades National Park, through the Mosaics in Science Internship Program. This summer Edwin is helping assess, maintain and monitor revegetation sites throughout the park. Read about what made Edwin decide to work with the National Park Service and its beautiful places. man posing in nature surrounded by plants
NORTH CASCADES AND MT. BAKER VISITOR INFORMATION GUIDE South of Fisher Basin North Cascades National Park Recreational Opportunities page 2 Trip Planning and Safety page 3 Baker Lake and Mt. Baker Scenic Byway pages 4 - 5 North Cascades Highway pages 6 - 7 Welcome to National Park and National Forest lands in the North Cascades. Located east of I-5, there are many opportunities for you to enjoy this area with relatively easy access by several major highways. Starting up north: take a drive on the Mt. Baker Scenic Byway (State Route 542). This route starts in Bellingham, winds along the North Fork of the Nooksack River, and, from the town of Glacier, climbs 24 miles to an elevation of 5,100 feet at Artist Point in Heather Meadows. This destination is legendary for spectacular views of Mt. Baker, Mt. Shuksan and surrounding peaks. For other stunning vistas, follow the northern part of the Cascade Loop along the North Cascades Scenic Highway (State Route 20). A side trip up the Baker Lake Road, 16 miles east of Sedro-Woolley, leads into the Baker Lake Basin, which hosts campgrounds, water recreation and numerous trails. The 125-mile Skagit Wild and Scenic River System – made up of segments of the Skagit, Cascade, Sauk, and Suiattle Rivers – provides important wildlife habitat and recreation. The Skagit is home to one of the largest winter populations of bald eagles in the United States and provides spawning grounds for one-third of all salmon in Puget Sound. The North Cascades Scenic Highway travels through the gateway communities of Concrete, Rockport, and Marblemount before reaching Ross Lake National Recreation Area within North Cascades National Park Complex. Along the way, visit the North Cascades Visitor Center near Newhalem and many viewpoints above Gorge, Diablo and Ross lakes, which offer pristine perspectives of surrounding peaks. These mountains are home to more than 300 glaciers in the park and over 600 in the ecosystem. Further to the east, Lake Chelan National Recreation Area features the third deepest lake in the nation. Gaze into the clear waters of Lake Chelan as you boat to the remote community of Stehekin and the Golden West Visitor Center. North Cascades National Park Complex pages 8 - 10 Enjoy your visit. Be safe and be prepared. NORTH CASCADES NATIONAL PARK COMPLEX MT. BAKER RANGER DISTRICT USFS 810 STATE ROUTE 20 SEDRO-WOOLLEY, WA 98284-1239 Key Partners and Volunteer Opportunities page 11 FIND MORE INFO AT: www.nps.gov/noca www.fs.usda.gov/mbs Banner photo: Courtesy of William Clark. Right: FS. Bottom: NPS/Bender Sidebar photos, from top down: David Snyder for the NPS, Snyder, FS, Snyder, Clark, Snyder EXPERIENCE YOUR AMERICA™ 2 North Cascades and Mt. Baker Visitor Information Guide Explore, Experience and Enjoy HIKING TRAILS AND CLIMBING PEAKS Hundreds of miles of trails lead into the North Cascades. Storm damage may affect your trip, so check trail conditions before you leave home. Most long hikes and climbs enter designated Wilderness Areas where special restrictions may apply. Climbers should choose experienced partners or licensed guides. GO FISHING Fishing in Washington, including in National Parks and Forests, requires a valid Washington State fishing license. In the National Forest, Baker Lake is a popular destination for salmon and trout fishing. The Skagit River, one of Washington’s major rivers, is home to seven species of anadromous fish (all five species of Pacific salmon and two types of trout) and freshwater trout and char. Visit the National Park and National Forest web sites for current recreation reports and climbing information. In the National Park, Diablo and Gorge Lakes have been stocked with rainbow and cutthroat trout. Ross Lake offers quality sport fishing opening annually on July 1. Lake Chelan has freshwater cod, trout and kokanee, a land-locked species of salmon. The Stehekin River offers rainbow and cutthroat trout. Comply with special regulations listed in the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Sport Fishing Regulations, available wherever licenses are sold and online at: wdfw.wa.gov BACKCOUNTRY WATER RECREATION River floating is an excellent adventure to plan. Experienced boaters run National Forest: Backcountry camping does not require a permit, but a Northwest Forest Pass is needed at many trailheads. Campers in the Mt. Baker National Recreation Area and some areas of the Wilderness must camp at designated sites. Campfires are not allowed in most backcountry areas and seasonal fire restrictions may apply. National Park: Free permits are required for overnight stays in both backcountry camps and cross-country zones and are issued in person only on a first-come, first-served basis. There are more than 200 backcountry camping sites, from boat-in sites to high alpine backpacking sites. Backcountry camping is allowed only at established sites. Camps include pit toilets, tent pads and in some cases, tables and fire pits. Disper

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