National Parks of New York Harbor

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National Parks of New York Harbor is the name of an office of the National Park Service that coordinates administration of eleven NPS sites that include 23 unique destinations located in the New York metropolitan area. The office covers properties ranging from the Statue of Liberty National Monument in New York Harbor to Gateway National Recreation Area in several locations and Saint Paul's Church National Historic Site in Mount Vernon, New York.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/npnh/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Parks_of_New_York_Harbor National Parks of New York Harbor is the name of an office of the National Park Service that coordinates administration of eleven NPS sites that include 23 unique destinations located in the New York metropolitan area. The office covers properties ranging from the Statue of Liberty National Monument in New York Harbor to Gateway National Recreation Area in several locations and Saint Paul's Church National Historic Site in Mount Vernon, New York. These 11 sites preserve more than 400 years of American history! We invite you to explore the past and investigate its relevance in our lives today. From the birth of American democracy to the evolution of commerce, harbor defense, ecology and immigration, the breadth of themes commemorated through the National Parks of New York Harbor reflect the richness and diversity of our heritage. For specific directions to each of the eleven national parks in New York Harbor please check their webpages. To get to our offices at Federal Hall National Memorial: The main entrance of Federal Hall is located at 26 Wall Street, near the corner of Wall Street and Nassau Street. The rear entrance, which is wheelchair accessible, is located at 15 Pine Street, near the intersection of Pine Street and Nassau Street. It is highly recommended that all visitors use mass transit when traveling to Federal Hall. Manhattan skyline as seen from Governors Island National Monument Manhattan skyline as seen from Governors Island National Monument National Parks of New York Harbor includes eleven national parks, including seven within Manhattan alone. General Grant National Memorial at dusk in midwinter General Grant National Memorial at dusk in midwinter The largest mausoleum in North America pays tribute to Civil War general and U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant, who is entombed here with his wife Julia. Battery Weed, Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island Battery Weed, Fort Wadsworth, Staten Island Gateway National Recreation Area covers two states and three New York City boroughs. Several of its sites are former military bases, such as Fort Wadsworth. Statue of Liberty looking ahead Statue of Liberty looking ahead Statue of Liberty National Monument also includes Ellis Island Immigration Museum. African Burial Ground National Monument African Burial Ground National Monument The African Burial Ground was a vast cemetery for enslaved and free Africans, forgotten since the 1790s, it was rediscovered in 1991. Shirley Chisholm State Park Opens in NYC Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the opening of the state's newest and largest public park in New York City, the 407-acre Shirley Chisholm State Park along the shores of Jamaica Bay. The new park honors Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm, an educator, former representative of the 12th Congressional district in New York for seven terms and the first African American woman to run for president. The park is a signature project of Governor Cuomo's Vital Brooklyn Initiative. Mural showing Shirley Chisholm with flowers and a butterfly Defending America’s Coasts The outbreak of World War I in 1914 required commissioned vessels, or cutters, of the Coast Guard to enforce US neutrality. Upon the declaration of war on Germany, Coast Guard vessels and sailors were transferred to the control of the Navy. The Coast Guard, created in 1915 and its predecessor, the Revenue Cutter Service, established in 1790, had long been responsible for governing the movement of vessels in American waters, as well as where vessels could anchor Historic image of the USS San Diego in 1916, a naval ship. Caffe Cino: Birthplace of Off-Off Broadway During its ten years, the coffeehouse changed the language of drama as a pioneer of “Off-Off Broadway,” where truly underground content could be explored. The business certainly did not make a lot of money. Cino worked other jobs to make ends meet and to pay off public officials, since he did not have a license as a theatre. Many plays contained gay content, but Caffe Cino’s embrace of bohemian and hippie life defied any single sexual identity or category. Plaque at Caffe Cino showing Joe behind the counter. NPS Photo by John Warren Gay Activist Alliance Firehouse: A "School for Democracy" Within weeks of the Stonewall Rebellion, activists formed the Gay Liberation Front (GLF). However, GLF members quickly divided over strategy. Some wanted to form alliances with other radical groups like the Black Panthers. Others wanted to focus exclusively on gay issues. The latter formed a group of their own, the Gay Activist Alliance, described as a "school for democracy." They set up shop in a former firehouse in Manhattan. National Park Service Establishes Internship Program at St. John’s University The National Park Service (NPS) and St. John’s University (SJU) announce the formation of a new partnership. Under a recently signed agreement, the History Department of St. John’s University will assist NPS with recruiting and training volunteers and interns for research and interpretive programs in metropolitan New York City. The initial phase of the five-year program focuses on Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration and the Trails and Rails Program. Nine adults look at the camera Washington Square: New York City Haven for Bohemians and Activists Washington Square has been known for decades as a place for bohemians, jazz and folk musicians, protesters, poets and people in love. It is also where the first gay and lesbian protest occurred in New York City after the Stonewall Uprising of 1969. Photo of Washington Square, New York by John Warren, NPS Photo The Lion's Head: "Drinkers with Writing Problems" Two doors down from the Stonewall Inn was one of the better-known bars and restaurants in New York City literary history. The walls of the Lion’s Head were covered with jacket covers of books by the writers who drank there—“drinkers with writing problems,” as its customers liked to say. For a writer, getting a space on the wall was like winning the Nobel Prize. It was also where one patron joined the rebellion two doors down at the Stonewall. Sign for Sheridan Park on a fence around a city garden The "Sip-In" at Julius' Bar in 1966 Unlike the Stonewall Inn, Julius’ Bar--just around the block from the Stonewall in Greenwich Village--had a liquor license. In fact, Julius' has been open at 159 West 10th Street and Waverly Place since the 1860s, although not always as a gay or gay-friendly bar. In fact, drinking while gay in the early 1960s was considered illegal. A three-story yellow building on a corner of the street Christopher Park: In 1969, a Refuge for LGBTQ Street Youth During the first night of the rebellion at least, a small city park across the street from the Stonewall Inn provided refuge for street youths. Christopher Park was their refuge during the day as well from a hard life on the streets. The entrance to Christopher Park, now part of Stonewall National Monument September 11, 2001, NPS Oral History Project This oral history project recorded the memories and perspectives of NPS staff who experienced the events of 9/11 and their aftermath. Transcripts and a 2004 report about the NPS response are available online. A petinad hand holds a flame aloft in the air.

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