"Pago Pago Harbor" by NPS , public domain

National Park of American Samoa

National Park - American Samoa

The National Park of American Samoa is distributed across three islands: Tutuila, Ofu, and Ta‘ū. The park preserves and protects coral reefs, tropical rainforests, fruit bats, and the Samoan culture. Popular activities include hiking and snorkeling. Of the park's 13,500 acres (5,500 ha), 9,000 acres (3,600 ha) is land and 4,500 acres (1,800 ha) is coral reefs and ocean.

maps

Official visitor map of National Park of American Samoa (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park of American Samoa - Manu'a Islands

Official visitor map of National Park of American Samoa (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of Tutuila Island of the official visitor map of National Park of American Samoa (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park of American Samoa - Tutuila Island

Detail of Tutuila Island of the official visitor map of National Park of American Samoa (NP). Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/npsa/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Park_of_American_Samoa The National Park of American Samoa is distributed across three islands: Tutuila, Ofu, and Ta‘ū. The park preserves and protects coral reefs, tropical rainforests, fruit bats, and the Samoan culture. Popular activities include hiking and snorkeling. Of the park's 13,500 acres (5,500 ha), 9,000 acres (3,600 ha) is land and 4,500 acres (1,800 ha) is coral reefs and ocean. The National Park of American Samoa welcomes you into the heart of the South Pacific, to a world of sights, sounds, and experiences that you will find in no other national park in the United States. Enjoy this unique national park and the welcoming people of American Samoa. We are here to protect its rich culture and natural resources. Come explore them with us! The visitor center is located in the village of Pago Pago, across from the Pago Way Service Station. The national park is located in the villages of Vatia, Pago Pago, Fagasa, Afono (on Tutuila Island), Fitiuta, Faleasao (on Ta'u Island), and Ofu Island Visitor Center and Park Store Open on weekdays from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Closed on weekends and federal holidays. Located in Pago Pago village, across from the Pago Way Service Station. Back side of Pola Island from Tuafanua Trail Tuafanua Trail Pola Island rises over 400 feet straight out of the ocean off Tutuila. A short walk from Vatia village, Pola is an ideal nesting site for many species of seabirds. Ta'u Island Ta'u Island Si'u Point is a good place to view the south coast of Ta'u. some of the tallest sea cliffs in the world stairstep over 3,000 feet to the summit of Lata Mountain. Ofu Island Ofu Island With a secluded sandy beach and fringing reef, Ofu unit of the park is an ideal place to snorkel or simply enjoy the solitude. The island of Olosega rises in the distance. King Fisher bird King Fisher bird Birds are the most abundant and diverse animals in American Samoa, as they are on most oceanic islands. Crown of Thorns Starfish Wreak Havoc in National Park of American Samoa Found throughout the Indo-Pacific the crown of thorns starfish, Acanthaster planci is one of the largest sea stars in the world (up to 45 cm across). Unlike the typical starfish with five arms, the crown of thorns starfish is disc-shaped with multiple arms (up to 21) covered in poisonous spines. These unique features gave rise to this starfish's commonly referred to name of the crown of thorns. Crown of thorns (Acanthaster planci) found in National Park of American Samoa Undergraduate scholars advance acoustic research in national parks In an NPS partnership with the Colorado State University Sound and Light Ecology team, undergraduate students working in the Listening Lab discover and assess a spectrum of acoustical data collected in national parks around the country. The primary goal of the lab is to aid in the understanding of natural soundscapes by providing a resource to efficiently analyze the thousands of hours of natural and anthropogenic, or human-caused, sounds recorded each year. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—National Park of American Samoa, American Samoa Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] shoreline cliffs Crystal Clear: Assessment of Potential Contaminants from a Dump to an Adjacent Coral Reef Lagoon on the Island of Ofu The dump for the village of Ofu is adjacent to this world-class coral reef. The dump has been in operation since 1985 and contains trash buried in unlined pits with porous soils that may allow chemical leaks to the reef. These chemicals may be harmful to the coral reef and human health. Before now, there has never been a study to determine whether pollutants are moving from the landfill to the lagoon. two large mountain peaks looking over an ocean bay 2017 Freeman Tilden Award Recipients Meet the national and regional winners of the 2017 Freeman Tilden Award; the National Park Service's highest award for excellence in interpretation. Portrait of Hollie Lynch Climate Change Clues from Monitoring As climate changes, significant changes in weather conditions impact the natural environment by shifting patterns of precipitation, promoting extremes in storm behavior, and influencing bird migration, invasive species spread, coral reef decline, and much more. The Pacific Island Network (PACN) undertakes systematic long-term monitoring of a wide variety of natural resources to accurately determine if change is occurring and why. Precipitation seen over the lush valleys of Kalaupapa National Historical Park. Stream Life in Hawai‘i National Parks Changes in weather patterns affect the quantity and quality of the water, which has profound effects on our native stream animals. In the Hawaiian Islands, the total amount of rain is expected to decrease as the impacts of climate change manifest. Deep Dive on a Shallow Reef: National Park of American Samoa Corals reefs around the world are feeling the heat from rising ocean temperatures. But coral communities off the coast of Ofu Island in the National Park of American Samoa provide some measure of hope for the future. Coral reef visible under clear water with forested mountains in distance National Park of American Samoa: World War II As World War II began, the Samoa islands were an essential link in the chain of communications between the United States, Australia, and New Zealand, a sea lane that also ran through the Fiji island. Holding the line drawn from Midway to Samoa, Fiji, and Brisbane against the Japanese was considered essential. The loss of these islands would have effectively cut off communications between the west coast of the United States and Australia. image of Samoan natives with M1 Garand rifles POET newsletter March 2015 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from March 2015. tsunami in American Samoa Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Crystal Clear: A Call to Action In 2016, the nation celebrates the centennial of the National Park Service (NPS) as the steward of special places that represent our natural and cultural heritage. Many national parks were founded on the beauty and value of water. Since the preservation of the Old Faithful Geyser in Yellowstone National Park in 1872, the National Park System has grown to include significant examples within majestic rivers, the Great Lakes, oceans and coasts, and other spectacular water resources. bright blue lake green islands in between Scientists Discover One of the World’s Largest Corals Near Ta'u Island, American Samoa The National Park of American Samoa, in collaboration with local partners, recently discovered one of the largest known corals in the world at the island of Ta’u in park waters. This <em>Porites</em> coral was 22.4 X 8 meters, with a circumference of 69 meters. Scientists estimate the coral is between 420 and 652 years old. The team also documented 84 other <em>Porites</em> colonies measuring over 10 meters. Enormous, dome-shaped coral colony. Scientists Examine Why Some Pacific Islands National Parks Have More Non-native Plants than Others Invasive non-native species represent one of the main threats to vulnerable island biodiversity. But why do some national parks in the Pacific Islands have more non-native plant species than others? Scientists examined how native plant communities, environment, and geography are associated with non-native plant species invasion across national parks in the Pacific islands to help understand this threat. Yellow flowers of non-native Kahili ginger blanket a forest floor. Rare Species Detected During Forest Bird Surveys in the National Park of American Samoa National Park of American Samoa harbors a diverse array of birds. Pacific Island Inventory & Monitoring Network surveys allow park managers to monitor their populations. During 2018 point counts to estimate population densities of species such as the Pacific kingfisher, crimson-crowned fruit dove, and the Samoan starling, surveyors detected the spotless crake—a rare species that has only been seen in Samoa a handful of times over the last 30 years. Pacific kingfisher perched on a twig. POET Newsletter September 2014 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from September 2014. Articles include: Sea Star Wasting Disease; Corallivore: Crown of Thorns Starfish Wreak Havoc in American Samoa — The NPS Responds; Seafloor in 3D; and Coral Bleaching Monitoring on Guam. A large, red-colored sunflower sea star that appears to be melting or disintegrating. Series: Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) Newsletters From 2009 to 2015, the Pacific Ocean Education Team published a series of short newsletters about the health of the ocean at various National Park Service sites in and around the Pacific Ocean. Topics covered included the 2010 tsunami, marine debris, sea star wasting disease, ocean acidification, and more. Ocean waves wash in from the right onto a forested and rocky shoreline. POET Newsletter Winter 2009 Pacific Ocean Education Team (POET) newsletter from Winter 2009. Articles include: Stewardship Without Boundaries: Conserving Our Ocean Ecosystem from Baja to the Bering Sea; Life Entwined with the Sea: The Non-Coastal A Seamless Park Connection; Engage Visitors in Ocean Park Stewardship; Inventory Map & Protect Ocean Parks; and Ocean Stewardship: A Commitment to Collaboration for Conservation. A color map indicating the depth of the Pacific Ocean floor. Darker blue represents deeper oceans.

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