Obed

Wild & Scenic River - Tennessee

Obed River is a stream draining a part of the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee. It, and particularly its tributaries, are important streams for whitewater enthusiasts. The Obed River rises in Cumberland County, Tennessee, just south of Crossville. It is bridged by U.S. Highway 70 between downtown Crossville and the municipal airport, and meets its confluence with the Little Obed River near a bridge on U.S. Highway 70N and an abandoned railroad bridge which was formerly part of the rail system linking Nashville and Knoxville. Shortly thereafter, it is bridged by U.S. Highway 127 and Interstate 40. The National Park Service maintains a visitor center located at 208 North Maiden Street in Wartburg. They also maintain the Rock Creek Campground and the Nemo Picnic Area.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/obed/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obed_River Obed River is a stream draining a part of the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee. It, and particularly its tributaries, are important streams for whitewater enthusiasts. The Obed River rises in Cumberland County, Tennessee, just south of Crossville. It is bridged by U.S. Highway 70 between downtown Crossville and the municipal airport, and meets its confluence with the Little Obed River near a bridge on U.S. Highway 70N and an abandoned railroad bridge which was formerly part of the rail system linking Nashville and Knoxville. Shortly thereafter, it is bridged by U.S. Highway 127 and Interstate 40. The National Park Service maintains a visitor center located at 208 North Maiden Street in Wartburg. They also maintain the Rock Creek Campground and the Nemo Picnic Area. The Obed Wild and Scenic River looks much the same today as it did when the first white settlers strolled its banks in the late 1700s. While meagerly populated due to poor farming soil, the river was a hospitable fishing and hunting area for trappers and pioneers. Today, the Obed stretches along the Cumberland Plateau and offers visitors a variety of outdoor recreational opportunities. The Obed Wild & Scenic River Visitor Center is located at 208 North Maiden Street in downtown Wartburg, Tennessee. Please use the link for more information. Obed Visitor Center The visitor center has free WiFi, and offers exhibits on the river, its inhabitants, the cultural history of the area, and the recreational opportunities that the park provides. The visitor center also offers an award-winning orientation film. A small bookstore is also included in the visitor center, which is open daily from 9:00-5:00 pm (ET), daily. The visitor center is closed Thanksgiving, December 25, and January 1. Address: 208 North Maiden Street Wartburg, Tennessee, 37887 The Obed Wild & Scenic River Visitor Center is located at 208 North Maiden Street in downtown Wartburg, Tennessee. Please use the link for more information on directions. Rock Creek Campground The Rock Creek Campground, located adjacent to the Nemo area of the Obed Wild & Scenic River, offers 11 spots for campers on a first come/first served basis. A $10 per night fee is charged and reservations are required. You may obtain your reservation by visiting www.recreation.gov and searching for "Rock Creek Campground - TN". The campground has grills and primitive toilet facilities, but no running water. Walk-in, tent-only site 10.00 The campground has grills and primitive toilet facilities, but no running water. Tent camping at Rock Creek Campground tent site Tent camping is popular at Obed WSR. Obed WSR in Fall Obed in Fall Obed in Fall Nemo at Night A star-filled night sky above the silhouette of a truss-bridge A Star-Filled Night Sky above the Historic Nemo Bridge Listening to the Eclipse: National Park Service scientists join Smithsonian, NASA in nationwide project A solar eclipse is visually stunning, but what will it sound like? NPS scientists will find out by recording sounds in parks across the USA. An NPS scientist installs audio recording equipment in a lush valley at Valles Caldera NP. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Obed Wild and Scenic River, Tennessee Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] stream and rocky shoreline Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Pennsylvanian Period—323.2 to 298.9 MYA Rocks in Cumberland Gap National Historical Park represent vast Pennsylvanian-age swamps. Plant life in those swamps later became coal found in the eastern United States. fossil tracks on sandstone slab Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix

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