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Ocmulgee Mounds

National Historical Park - Georgia

Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park in present-day Macon, Georgia, preserves traces of over ten millennia of culture from the American Indians in the Southeastern Woodlands. Its chief remains are major earthworks built before 1000 CE by the South Appalachian Mississippian culture (a regional variation of the Mississippian culture.) These include the Great Temple and other ceremonial mounds, a burial mound, and defensive trenches. They represented highly skilled engineering techniques and soil knowledge, and the organization of many laborers. The site has evidence of 17,000 years of continuous human habitation.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).Georgia State - Georgia Bike Map

Statewide Bike Map of Georgia. Published by the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT).

https://www.nps.gov/ocmu/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ocmulgee_Mounds_National_Historical_Park Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park in present-day Macon, Georgia, preserves traces of over ten millennia of culture from the American Indians in the Southeastern Woodlands. Its chief remains are major earthworks built before 1000 CE by the South Appalachian Mississippian culture (a regional variation of the Mississippian culture.) These include the Great Temple and other ceremonial mounds, a burial mound, and defensive trenches. They represented highly skilled engineering techniques and soil knowledge, and the organization of many laborers. The site has evidence of 17,000 years of continuous human habitation. Welcome to Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park. This park is a prehistoric American Indian site, where many different American Indian cultures occupied this land for thousands of years. American Indians first came here during the Paleo-Indian Period hunting Ice Age mammals. Around 900 CE, the Mississippian Period began, and people constructed mounds for their elite, which remain here today. Drive on I-75 to Macon. Exit I-75 onto I-16 east (exit on left) . Get off I-16 at exit 2 (Coliseum Drive), take a left under the highway and proceed to where Coliseum Dr. ends at Emery Highway. Turn right on Emery Highway and proceed to the third light. Our entrance is on the right side of the road. Ocmulgee Mounds Visitor Center Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park Park grounds and walking trails from 8:00 to 5:00 pm daily. The Visitor Center and Earth Lodge are open from 9:00 am-5:00 pm daily. Take I-16 to exit 2, Turn left unto Coliseum Dr. stay in right lane turn right unto Emery Hwy go 1 mile and the park will be on your right Great Temple and Lesser Temple Mound mounds The Great Temple Mound is the largest mound at the park, it stands at 55 feet tall. Earth Lodge earth lodge The Earth Lodge was used as a council chamber for the Mississippian Culture (900-1600) Earth Lodge Floor earth lodge floor The earth Lodge floor is original it was carbon dated to 1015. The Funeral Mound funeral mound The Funeral Mound was by prehistoric cultures to bury their dead. Today there are still remains instead the mound Clovis Point spear point This Clovis point is the first spear found east of the Mississippi River. It was carbon dated to 10,000 BC National Park Getaway: Ocmulgee National Monument In the heart of Georgia lies a place that has been settled for 17,000 years. Ocmulgee National Monument’s human history dates to the Paleo-Indian Period, and the area was occupied until the Muscogee (Creek) removal in 1826. Today, the park preserves prehistoric mounds and a massive collection of artifacts that tell the story of these past cultures. People walking on boardwalk down a large prehistoric mound NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Ocmulgee Mounds National Historical Park, Georgia Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] park vista with mound in distance Celebrating soils across the National Park System First in a series of three "In Focus" articles that share insights into the near-universal and far-reaching effects of soils on the ecology, management, and enjoyment of our national parks. Fossil soils at Cabrillo National Monument reveal marine deposits Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Plan Like A Park Ranger for Ocmulgee Mounds Plan like a Park Ranger at Ocmulgee Mounds, a rangers top 10 tips about vising the park! A park ranger smiling with a blue sky in the background

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