"Summer Nights" by NPS , public domain

Oklahoma City

National Memorial - Oklahoma

The Oklahoma City National Memorial honors the victims, survivors, rescuers, and all who were affected by the Oklahoma City bombing on April 19, 1995. The memorial is located in downtown Oklahoma City on the former site of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, which was destroyed in the 1995 bombing.

maps

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Oklahoma City NMEM https://www.nps.gov/okci/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oklahoma_City_National_Memorial The Oklahoma City National Memorial honors the victims, survivors, rescuers, and all who were affected by the Oklahoma City bombing on April 19, 1995. The memorial is located in downtown Oklahoma City on the former site of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, which was destroyed in the 1995 bombing. The outdoor symbolic memorial is a place of quiet reflection, honoring victims, survivors, rescuers, and all who were changed forever on April 19, 1995. It encompasses the now sacred soil where the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building once stood, capturing and preserving forever the place and events that changed the world. The Memorial & Museum are located at 6th St. and Harvey Ave in Oklahoma City, OK. Children's Area Tiles with hand prints and chalkboards set into the ground for children. This area provides letter shaped chalkboards to allow the continued emotional expressions from those young and old. A surrounding wall displays a collection of painted tiles sent by schools, showing their compassion for the bombing-affected community Memorial Fence Fencing with pictures, stuffed animals and other tokens left on it. This 200 foot section of chain link fence was taken from the original barrier surrounding the bombing site. The fence served as the first spontaneous memorial and a location for people to leave tokens of collective grief. It retains this purpose still to Summer Nights Summer evening photo of the Memorial lit up at night Beat the summer heat, on an evening stroll through the illuminated Field of Empty Chairs, the Gates of Time, and the Survivor Tree. All walkways are brightened to allow enjoyment of this peaceful time of day. Snow on Empty Chairs Snow covered Field of Empty Chairs The Memorial becomes a silent place during the rare winter snow storms that blow through. The cold and quiet house a stillness made for reflection as one walks through the Field of Empty Chairs. Rescuers' Orchard in Fall Bright Red Chinese Pastiche tree in the Rescuers' Orchard. This Chinese Pastiche is located in the small orchard that was planted in recognition of the over 12,000 rescue workers who responded to the bombing. Its vibrant hues draw attention to the tremendous work these heroes accomplished. Connie Rudd: Defining a Career Path Connie Rudd's career with the National Park Service began as a seasonal ranger in 1979. Her continual desire to learn propelled her to various sites and positions in interpretation, planning, and management until 2014, when she retired as Park Superintendent. In this Spotlight article, Rudd reflects on her career path, changes in interpretation, and being in upper management as a woman. Part of "Women’s Voices: Women in the National Park Service Oral History Project." Connie Rudd smiles for a portrait in an outdoor setting, wearing a NPS uniform and flathat

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