by Alex Gugel , all rights reserved

Organ Pipe Cactus

National Monument - Arizona

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is a U.S. National Monument and UNESCO biosphere reserve located in extreme southern Arizona which shares a border with the Mexican state of Sonora.

location

maps

Official visitor map of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Organ Pipe Cactus - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Detail of the official visitor map of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Organ Pipe Cactus - Visitor Map Detail

Detail of the official visitor map of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Pima and Santa Cruz County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Pima and Santa Cruz County

Pima and Santa Cruz County Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).AZ Surface Management Responsibility - Arizona State

Statewide Map of Arizona Surface Management Responsibility. Published by Arizona State Land Department and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).

brochures

Visitor Guide to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Organ Pipe Cactus - Guide 2017/2018

Visitor Guide to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Organ Pipe Cacti - Our Namesake Cactus at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Organ Pipe Cactus - Organ Pipe Cacti-Our Namesake Cactus

Brochure about Organ Pipe Cacti - Our Namesake Cactus at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Saguaro Cactus at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Organ Pipe Cactus - Growth of a Saguaro Cactus

Brochure about Saguaro Cactus at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Snakes at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Organ Pipe Cactus - Snakes

Brochure about Snakes at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Brochure about Endangered Species at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Organ Pipe Cactus - Endangered Species

Brochure about Endangered Species at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Guide to Hiking Trails at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Organ Pipe Cactus - Guide to Hiking Trails

Guide to Hiking Trails at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (NM) in Arizona. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/orpi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_Pipe_Cactus_National_Monument Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument is a U.S. National Monument and UNESCO biosphere reserve located in extreme southern Arizona which shares a border with the Mexican state of Sonora. Look closely. Look again. The sights and sounds of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, an International Biosphere Reserve, reveal a thriving community of plants and animals. Human stories echo throughout this desert preserve, chronicling thousands of years of desert living. A scenic drive, wilderness hike or a night of camping will expose you to a living desert that thrives. The Kris Eggle Visitor Center is located on Highway 85, approximately 25 miles south of Why, AZ. Kris Eggle Visitor Center Kris Eggle Visitor Center includes an information desk, nature trail, exhibit hall, 15 minute film, and a bookstore. The Kris Eggle Visitor Center is located approximately 25 miles south of Why, AZ on Highway 85. The Visitor Center is located 5 miles north of the Lukeville Port of Entry. Alamo Canyon Primitive Campground Primitive, 4 site campground at the mouth of Alamo Canyon. No RVs, trailers or generators. Alamo Canyon Camping Fee 12.00 Fee is per site, per night. Alamo Canyon Campground- Senior/Access Rate 6.00 Holders of the interagency senior or access pass are entitled to half price camping. tent at alamo canyon tent pitched on the ground at alamo canyon in front of saguaro and organ pipe cacti Tent campers flock to the primitive experience at Alamo Canyon Alamo Campground Campground site with a picnic table and standing grill, with mountains and canyon in the background Many visitors seeking seclusion and solitude enjoy the Alamo Canyon campground. Hiking Alamo Canyon Older male and female hiking on a desert trail From the campground you can access the picturesque Alamo Canyon trail. Twin Peaks Campground Twin Peaks Campground is the main, developed campground at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, located 1.5 miles from the Kris Eggle Visitor Center and Highway 85. Twin Peaks Campground has 34 tent-only sites and 174 sites for RVs. Several sites can accommodate RVs up to 45 feet in length. Restrooms have running water and a few have solar showers. Hookups for electricity, water, or sewer are not available. A dump station, with potable water is located past the last row of campsites. Twin Peaks Campground Fee 20.00 Per night, per site (camping fees are in addition to entry fees) Twin Peaks Campground Fee: Senior/ Access Pass 10.00 Per night, per site (camping fees are in addition to entry fees). Group Camping Fee 50.00 Fee per site, per night. Tent sites at Twin Peaks Campground man putting up an orange tent on a gravel tent pad in the desert Thirty-four sites are reserved for tent camping only, at the southern end of the campground. RV Sites at Twin Peaks Campground Male and female sit at a desert campground site with a camper van in the background Campers enjoy a relaxing afternoon at the Twin Peaks Campground. Twin Peaks Campground View of many RVs in campground, surrounded by desert landscape with mountains in the distance Campers at Twin Peaks Campground enjoy expansive views of the desert and the mountains in the distance Twin Peaks Campground Campsite with a picnic table, paved pad, raised grill, and blooming barrel cacti Campsite visitors have the opportunity to sleep under beautiful stars-scapes, up close to organ pipe cacti, and with beautiful views of desert mountains. Organ Pipe Cactus at sunset Organ pipe cactus and mountains at sunset Visit the only place in the U.S. where you can see large stands of organ pipe cacti. Organ Pipe Cactus sun setting on a green organ pipe cactus Experience the only place in the US where the Organ Pipe Cactus naturally grows Scenic views in Alamo Canyon View of Alamo Canyon trail, flanked by saguaros and vegetation with mountains in background Capture amazing views from trails and scenic drives Sonoran Pronghorn Sonoran pronghorn with cholla stuck to its face Experience the wildlife of the most biodiverse desert in North America Blooming saguaro cactus A saguaro cactus with white blooms, with reddish mountains in the background Experience the rich assemblage of cacti at Organ Pipe Cactus. It’s Alive! Biological Soil Crusts of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts It might come as a surprise to learn that in the sublime expanses of the Sonoran and Chihuahuan deserts, some of the most interesting life around can be found in the dirt right in front of your feet! Biological soil crusts form a living groundcover that is the foundation of desert plant life. Soil crust at White Sands National Monument Changes over 30 years in populations of the leafcutter ant Atta mexicana at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument: An analysis of long-term environmental impacts on population size and survival A social insect biologist analyzes longtime environmental impacts on population size and survival. A ranger-naturalist conducts an “ant walk” near the park visitor center (1987). Bat Projects in Parks: Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Better training for employees means better chances for bats in Organ Pipe National Monument! Little bats hanging from a wood overhang Saguaro Cactus: Sentinel of the Southwest The saguaro cactus is the largest cactus in the U.S., commonly reaching 40 feet in height. The saguaro provides both food and shelter for a variety of desert species and plays an integral role in the culture of the Tohono O’odham people. It has been written that the saguaro can be ecologically connected to nearly every other organism in its range, including humans. Saguaro cacti at Saguaro National Park Organ Pipe Cactus The namesake species of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, the organ pipe cactus is the second largest columnar cactus in the United States and can grow up to 23 feet tall. Organ pipe cactus Interdisciplinary Personnel Provide Value Support for Wildland Fire Efforts Nationwide Many of our interdisciplinary agency personnel Servicewide play a key role in supplementing agency fire staff and providing key skill sets for interagency wildland fire efforts nationwide. Personnel from all disciplines – fire management, resource management, visitor and resource protection, administration, facility management, even Superintendents – help support wildland fire activities throughout the year. Three firefighters standing in a field looking into the smoke and sun from a wildfire. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] organ pipe cactus silhouetted at sunset Monitoring Upland Vegetation and Soils in the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert Networks Vegetation and soils are two of many natural resources monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Learning about vegetation dynamics helps us to better understand the integrity of ecological processes, productivity trends, and ecosystem interactions that can otherwise be difficult to monitor. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor vegetation and soils using the scientific protocol described here. Quadrat used for biological soil crust sampling Wildland Fire in Chaparral: California and Southwestern United States Chaparral is a general term that applies to various types of brushland found in southern California and the southwestern U.S. This community contains the most flammable type of vegetation found in the United States. Chaparral on steep rocky slopes. Native Peoples of the Sonoran Desert: The O'odham The O'odham people (also known as the Pima) occupied a region spanning hundreds of square miles of what is now Arizona and Sonora. group photo of O'odham people standing in front of mission church Pollinators - Lesser Long-nose bat Get batty over Lesser Long-nose bats! With tongues as long as their bodies, lesser long-nosed bats (Leptonycteris yerbabuena) are unsung heroes in maintaining fragile desert ecosystems. A researcher's gloved hand holds a brown Lesser Long-nose bat Southern Basin and Range The Southern Basin and Range is an extension of the Basin and Range Province centered on Nevada and the Great Basin and extending from southern Oregon to western Texas, and into northwest Mexico. Mountains and Desert in Guadalupe Mountains National Park Climate Monitoring in the Southern Plains, Sonoran Desert, and Chihuahuan Desert Climate is one of many ecological indicators monitored by the National Park Service (NPS) Division of Inventory & Monitoring (I&M). Climate data help scientists to understand ecosystem processes and help to explain many of the patterns and trends observed in other natural-resource monitoring. In NPS units of the American Southwest, three I&M networks monitor climate using the scientific protocol described here. Kayaking across a fl ooded parking lot, Chickasaw NRA, July 2007. Saguaro Cactus Growth The saguaro cactus is the signature plant of the Sonoran Desert. This stately giant is not only unique in appearance, it is also unique in its biology and ecological niche. blooming saguaro Climate and Water Monitoring at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument At Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, springs and tinajas provide important ecosystem services for one of the most biologically diverse protected areas in the Sonoran Desert. The Sonoran Desert Network monitors climate, groundwater, and springs at this park. Understanding changes in these closely linked factors helps managers make informed decisions affecting both natural and cultural resources. Learn about our recent findings. Woman in NPS uniform crouches next to a tinaja, holding a probe wired to an electronic unit. Plant Responses to Climate Change in the Sonoran Desert: Recent Research and Findings Under the effects of climate change, the Sonoran Desert is expected to become hotter and drier. These changes are likely to have strong impacts on the abundance and distribution of the region's plant species. A recent study used long-term vegetation monitoring results across two national parks and two research sites to determine how Sonoran Desert plant species have responded to past climate variability. Mesquite savanna Tortillas de harina (Flour Tortillas) What exactly are tortillas? How big are they? Of what are they made? How should they be made? These are questions that can spark much discussion and debate, even among tortilla makers themselves. The important thing is that none of this really matters - they are good, as you will be able to assert for yourself when you eat one made fresh by a Tumacácori demonstrator or in your own kitchen. Tortilla demonstrator in front of Tumacácori mission church Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display at a visitor center Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: Defining the Southwest The Southwest has a special place in the American imagination – one filled with canyon lands, cacti, roadrunners, perpetual desert heat, a glaring sun, and the unfolding of history in places like Tombstone and Santa Fe. In the American mind, the Southwest is a place without boundaries – a land with its own style and its own pace – a land that ultimately defies a single definition. Maize agriculture is one component of a general cultural definition of the Southwest. Neogene Period—23.0 to 2.58 MYA Some of the finest Neogene fossils on the planet are found in the rocks of Agate Fossil Beds and Hagerman Fossil Beds national monuments. fossils on display in a visitor center Cenozoic Era The Cenozoic Era (66 million years ago [MYA] through today) is the "Age of Mammals." North America’s characteristic landscapes began to develop during the Cenozoic. Birds and mammals rose in prominence after the extinction of giant reptiles. Common Cenozoic fossils include cat-like carnivores and early horses, as well as ice age woolly mammoths. fossils on display in a visitor center Series: Native Peoples of the Sonoran Desert Who were the original inhabitants of the Sonoran desert and how did they adapt to the world-changing arrival of Spanish colonists? folklórico dancers with a series of different flags including Arizona and Tohono O'odham The Heliograph: 2020 Edition The Heliograph is the official newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. This issue features stories on how we adapted our operations to minimize field work lost to the covid-19 pandemic, vegetation mapping at Saguaro NP, and communication improvements and opportunities for network parks. We also probe the minds of our interns and celebrate a high honor for our program manager. heliograph Top Ten Tips for Visiting Organ Pipe Plan Like a Park Ranger! Here are our top 10 tips to plan an enjoyable, safe, and memorable trip to Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. Ranger Donna looks up, with finger point to her chin as if pondering a question. The Heliograph: Summer 2021 The Heliograph is the official newsletter of the Sonoran Desert Network and Desert Research Learning Center. This issue shares predictive tools and planning processes that can help park managers make proactive decisions in the face of climate change. We also explore some explanations for this spring's highly unusual saguaro bloom, celebrate our staff members, and provide updates on our monitoring projects. heliograph Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Dare to Imagine: Elise Dillingham Read about how Elise went from training to become a flight nurse for the US Air Force to engaging youth citizen scientists in Southwestern parks. This article is part of a National Park Foundation funded project called the Dare to Imagine project dedicated to highlighting women in parks who are breaking barriers and showing what a scientist looks like. graphic of a young woman in the field. text reads: Elise Dillingham, biologist Mind the Gap: Modeling Missing Data for Complex Survey Designs Long-term environmental monitoring usually requires complex sampling designs. By necessity, these designs sample a limited set of conditions on just a fraction of the landscape, which results in missing data. This article summarizes recent research that applies Bayesian modeling to three case studies in national parks. This approach allows park ecologists and analysts to move beyond missing data to support data-driven management and monitoring of natural resources. Two technicians record observations along a transect tape on sandy ground dotted with shrubs.

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