"Jacks Fork River near Buck Hollow" by U.S. National Park Service , public domain

Ozark

National Scenic Riverways - Missouri

The Ozark National Scenic Riverways park in the Ozarks of southern Missouri in the U.S. protects Current and Jacks Fork rivers. The park is used for many forms of recreation and are home to abundant animal and plant species. Canoeing is one of the most popular activities. Kayaking and inflatable rafts and tubes add to the volume of river floaters. Motorized boating with jonboats is also a popular activity of locals and nearby Missourians. Other activities include horseback riding, hunting, hiking, fishing, camping, birdwatching, nature photography, and sightseeing.

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Official visitor map of Ozark National Scenic Riverways (NSR) in Missouri. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Ozark - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Ozark National Scenic Riverways (NSR) in Missouri. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail of Tears - Trail Map

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/ozar/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ozark_National_Scenic_Riverways The Ozark National Scenic Riverways park in the Ozarks of southern Missouri in the U.S. protects Current and Jacks Fork rivers. The park is used for many forms of recreation and are home to abundant animal and plant species. Canoeing is one of the most popular activities. Kayaking and inflatable rafts and tubes add to the volume of river floaters. Motorized boating with jonboats is also a popular activity of locals and nearby Missourians. Other activities include horseback riding, hunting, hiking, fishing, camping, birdwatching, nature photography, and sightseeing. Ozark National Scenic Riverways is the first national park area to protect a river system. The Current and Jacks Fork rivers are two of the finest floating rivers you'll find anywhere. Spring-fed, cold and clear they are a delight to canoe, swim, boat or fish. Besides these two famous rivers, the park is home to hundreds of freshwater springs, caves, trails and historic sites such as Alley Mill. The Headquarters for Ozark National Scenic Riverways is located at 404 Watercress Drive in Van Buren, Missouri. It's located at the corner of Watercress Drive and Main Street, across the street from the Van Buren Public School complex. Alley Mill Alley General Store will be CLOSED for the 2021 Season. Alley Mill is located at Alley Spring. The facility offers an Eastern National sales area and exhibits related to the Ozark culture surrounding milling communities. Alley Mill and General Store are located at Alley Spring, which is 6 miles west of Eminence, Missouri, on State Highway 106. Headquarters Visitor Information Center The Park Headquarters Visitor Information Center is open year-round in Van Buren, Missouri. The Visitor Information Center is located at park headquarters and contains an Eastern National sales area, park information, exhibits and a historic film made on the Current River. Visitor Information Center and restrooms are wheelchair accessible. Park Headquarters is located at the intersection of Watercress Drive and Main Street, across from the Van Buren Public School complex. Akers Group Campground Group campsites, located at Akers Ferry. The campground is located north of the junction of Highway KK and Highway K. Summer group site fee 50.00 Summer group site fee from April 15 to October 15. Akers Map showing campsites, restrooms, ranger station, roads and river Akers has group camp sites only. Akers Map showing campsites, restrooms, ranger station, roads and river Akers has group camp sites only. Alley Spring Campground Campground located near Alley Spring, 6 miles west of Eminence, MO on State Highway 106. Summer electric site camping fee 19.00 Electric site fee for April 15 to October 15 Summer non-electric camping site fee 16.00 Non- electric site fee from April 15 to October 15 Summer group site fee 100.00 Group site fee April 15 to October 15 Summer cluster site fee 35.00 Cluster site fee April 15 - October 15. Cluster sites allow 7-20 people, and 6 tents; OR 4 tents and 2 RVs. Summer pavilion reservation fee 33.00 Fee to reserve Burr Oak or Alley Spring pavilions on http://www.recreation.gov. May be reserved April 15-October 15. Winter electric campsite fee 15.00 Fee for electric campsites from October 16 to April 14. Winter non-electric campsite fee 12.00 Fee for non-electric campsites from October 16 to April 14. Alley Spring Campground Map a map showing campsites, roads, trails, restrooms, river access, showers Alley Spring Campground Map Big Spring Campground The Big Spring Campground is located near Big Spring, south of Van Buren, Missouri. Electric and non-electric sites are available at Big Spring year-round. Some sites are reservable and others are available on a first come first serve basis. Sites may be reserved at www.recreation.gov. Electric Site Camping fee 19.00 Fee for electric camp sites from April 15 to October 15 Non-electric sites fee 16.00 Non-electric camping fee for April 15 to October 15 Group sites fee 100.00 Fee for April 15 to October 15 Backcountry group site fee 50.00 Fee for backcountry group site April 15 to October 15 Pavilion reservation fee - Big Spring and Peavine pavilions 33.00 Fee for reserving the Big Spring or Peavine pavilions online at www.recreation.gov Winter electric site camping fee 15.00 Fee for electric sites October 16 - April 14 Winter non-electric site camping fee 12.00 Fee for non-electric sites October 16 to April 14 Big Spring Campground Map a printed map showing campsites, roads, river, restrooms at Big Spring Campground Big Spring Map Pulltite Campground Pulltite Campground is located north of Round Spring, at the end of EE Highway off State Highway 19 in Shannon County. Summer non-electric camping fee 16.00 Summer non-electric camping fee from April 15 to October 15. Summer group site fee 100.00 Summer group site fee from April 15 to October 15. Winter non-electric camping fee 12.00 Winter non-electric fee from October 16 to April 14. Pulltite Map A map showing campsites, restrooms, ranger station, river access, phone, information Pulltite Campground Map Round Spring Campground Round Spring Campground is located near Round Spring, approximately 12 miles north of Eminence on State Highway 19. Summer electric sites camping fee 19.00 Fee for electric sites April 15 - October 15. Summer non-electric site fee. 16.00 Fee for non-electric camping sites from April 15 to October 15. Summer group site camping fee 100.00 Fee for group camping sites from April 15 to October 15. Winter non-electric camping fee 12.00 Winter non-electric campsites from October 16 to April 14. Winter electric site camping fee 15.00 Winter electric site fee from October 16 to April 14. Round Spring Campground Map a map showing campsites, restrooms, river access, camp host, ranger station and roads Round Spring Campground Map Two Rivers Campground Two Rivers Campground is located at the confluence of the Jacks Fork and Current Rivers, at the end of V Highway off State Highway 106 in Shannon County, MO. Summer non-electric camping fee 16.00 Summer non-electric camping from April 15 to October 15 Summer cluster camping fee 35.00 Summer cluster camping fee from April 15 to October 15. Cluster sites allow 7-20 people, with up to 6 tents OR 4 tents and 2 RVs. Backcountry camping fee 5.00 Backcountry campsite fee from April 15 to October 15 for 3 sites located near the gravel bar. Two Rivers two clear stream join with blue pool in middle of picture, hillsides with green trees, gravel bar Two Rivers has one of the best views in the park. Clubhouse Overlook Sunset picture with high vantage point overlooking river with fall colors and sun setting in distanc Ozark National Scenic Riverways has some spectacular scenery. Big Spring A sunrise photo with blue turbulent water and a algae colored rock with trees overhanging Big Spring produces more than 250 million gallons of water per day. Rocky Falls a brown gravel bar with distant waterfall of water flowing down over brown rocks Rocky Falls is a popular picnic area and swimming hole located near the center of Ozark National Scenic Riverways. Prairie Hollow Gorge looking down through large brown/grey/purple boulders with creek in middle and forest in distance Prairie Hollow Gorge is located near the Two Rivers junction, off State Route V. Current River near Pulltite A red canoe on gravel bar with clear blue stream behind and green forest The clear water of the Current River is perfect for floating. Klepzig Mill fall colors on leaves of trees surrounding a creek with an old wooden mill on the right Klepzig Mill is a little off the beaten path but worth the trip. Alley Mill-Winter a red mill with snow on roof with a stream emanating from it. Alley Mill is a popular destination. Klepzig Mill-Shut In brown rocks with water flowing over like a waterfall Klepzig Mill has a series of shut-ins along the creek Around the country with the monarch butterfly It's about to begin! What parks will the monarchs amazing journey take them? A mock monarch selfie at Ozakrs National Scenic Riverways Bat Projects in Parks: Ozarks National Scenic Riverways Find out why this cave system won a national award in Ozark National Scenic Riverways! A group of professionals examine a gate inside a cave Exceptional Warrior Mobility Impaired Managed Hunt Ozark National Scenic Riverways holds a managed deer hunt for Wounded Warriors in partnership with the Foundation for Exceptional Warriors (The FEW) and the Missouri Department of Conservation.This managed hunt is made available to ten individuals who are current or honorably discharged military members with permanent mobility impairments. Wounded warrior with two deer in bed of truck. Partnership for Prescribed Burning Provides Multiple Benefits at Ozark National Scenic Riverways Cooperation with Missouri Department of Conservation consolidated smaller burn units on Ozark NSR and DEC land into one unit and increased the unit area. This expansion increased operational safety and efficiency and reduced average cost from $79/acre to $5/acre. The purpose of the burn was to restore declining glade and woodland habitat and increase the average number of grass and wildflower species in each habitat type from preburn conditions. Partnership Expands Prescribed Fire Units for the Benefit of Rare Fire-Dependent Species In 2012, the Missouri Area Park Group Fire Management staff at Ozark National Scenic Riverways (OZAR) initiated a partnership with the L-A-D Foundation to manage several newly discovered populations of the nationally rare tall larkspur. This partnership effort quadrupled the size of two existing prescribed fire units, which were originally established to reduce unnaturally heavy fuel loads near several of the park’s historic structures. Colorful butterfly on purple tall larkspur flower Wildland Fire in Oak Woodlands and Savannas of the Midwestern United States Oak woodlands depend on disturbances like fire to survive. Frequent fire created and maintained the open structure and make-up of the woodlands. Today, there are fewer oak woodlands across the central United States. Oak woodlands are converting into forests due to a lack of fire. Oak trees with an understory of grasses and forbs. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Missouri Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] stream cascading over boulders Partners Matter: NPS and Several Partners Have Very Successful Prescribed Burn in Missouri Prescribed burning in the Ozarks is for the birds, but it is also for the elk, deer, wildflowers, pollinators, and the resiliency of the Ozarks to climate change. Yellow and black bird on branch in leafy tree. Community Wildfire Protection Plan Developed Collaboratively in Ozark National Scenic Riverways The fire management staff from the Missouri Area Park Group, located at Ozark National Scenic Riverways, worked with partners to help Shannon County develop a community wildfire protection plan that was finalized in 2012. Community outreach was also conducted. The county and its communities can now tap into national funding sources to help with community fire planning, hazardous fuel reduction, and wildfire prevention. Youth Intern Program Aids in Conservation of Rare Fire-Dependent Wildflower Tall larkspur is a nationally rare, fire-dependent wildflower that occurs primarily in the Appalachian corridor. Tall larkspur that grows in the Missouri Ozarks is separated by more than 400 miles from the nearest Appalachian population. Youth Intern Program botanists have helped to collect data on the plants that may lead to improved conservation. They have mapped populations and coordinated a study of whether the Ozark population is a distinct species. Tall larkspur in bloom Riverways Junior Ranger Explore the river from your living room. The Ozark National Scenic Riverways Junior Ranger Program provides this online activity guide to help you discover what makes rivers of the Ozark National Scenic Riverway special. Two rivers come together with green foliage lining the bank and a junior ranger patch in the center Big Spring Historic District Cultural Landscape The Big Spring Historic District is the site of the former Big Spring State Park, which was established in 1924 and developed by the Civilian Conservation Corps from 1933 to 1937. It is an outstanding example of Rustic style architecture and Naturalistic style landscape architecture, It contains trails and roads, a quarry, ruins of a CCC camp, and fire tower. and the landscape features reflect the circumstances of an operational CCC Camp and functioning state park. Picnic shelter with a stone fireplace and chimney and wooden roof over a table. Bat Decline from White-Nose Syndrome, New Faunal Records, Flood Damage Bat surveys this past winter showed declines in three bat species from White-Nose Syndrome while two endangered bats showed stable numbers. New faunal records were added as well as a biological survey of several caves were completed. Flooding in April damaged numerous buildings. scientist collecting sample in cave Aquatic Invertebrate Monitoring at Ozark National Scenic Riverways Ozark National Scenic Riverways is a magical place where more than 425 springs flow from the ground. The largest, Big Spring, gushes enough water to fill an Olympic-sized swimming pool in about two minutes. River at Ozark National Scenic Riverways. Fish Communities at Ozark National Scenic Riverways Scientists have been tracking fish populations in the Current River and its tributaries since 2005. They collect fish by using electrofishing techniques. Tracking fish allows scientists to determine which species are in the park and how well they doing in the streams. Jacks Fork River at Ozark National Scenic Riverways. Series: Inside Earth – NPS Cave & Karst News – Summer 2017 This newsletter is produced as a forum for information and idea exchanges between National Park Service units that contain caves and karst landscapes. It also provides a historical overview and keeps partners and other interested folks aware of cave and karst management activities. 4 rangers walk through shoe cleaning station Series: Geologic Time Periods in the Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Paddling and River Safety Paddling and River Safety Ordovician Period—485.4 to 443.8 MYA Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains national parks, along with the Blue Ridge Parkway that connects them, pass through rocks from the core of the Appalachian Mountains. The mountains began forming during the Ordovician and eventually attained elevations similar to those of the Himalayas. rock with fossil brachiopod shells Paleozoic Era During the Paleozoic Era (541 to 252 million years ago), fish diversified and marine organisms were very abundant. In North America, the Paleozoic is characterized by multiple advances and retreats of shallow seas and repeated continental collisions that formed the Appalachian Mountains. Common Paleozoic fossils include trilobites and cephalopods such as squid, as well as insects and ferns. The greatest mass extinction in Earth's history ended this era. fossil corals in a rock matrix Blanket Cave National Youth Park—Activity Enjoy a fun activity and learn about caves even when you can't get out to a park. In this activity you will build your own cave and learn how to make it like a "real" natural cave. Find out about cave formations and wildlife, and how to be safe and care for caves. New "Blanket Cave National Youth Parks" are springing up all across America! Join the fun! cartoon drawing of a childs and a park ranger exploring a cave Rallying Around Veterans in the Riverways Ozark National Scenic Riverways and partners hosted events to show appreciation and promote parks as recreational opportunities for Veterans. This past weekend a ceremonial tribute and hike to honor Veterans took place, as well as a special managed deer hunt for mobility-impaired Veterans. Park Rangers and Veterans hold an American Flag at a ceremony honoring Veterans. Find Your Park on Route 66 Route 66 and the National Park Service have always had an important historical connection. Route 66 was known as the great road west and after World War II families on vacation took to the road in great numbers to visit the many National Park Service sites in the Southwest and beyond. That connection remains very alive and present today. Take a trip down Route 66 and Find Your Park today! A paved road with fields in the distance. On the road is a white Oklahoma Route 66 emblem. Changing Patterns of Water Availability May Change Vegetation Composition in US National Parks Across the US, changes in water availability are altering which plants grow where. These changes are evident at a broad scale. But not all areas experience the same climate in the same way, even within the boundaries of a single national park. A new dataset gives park managers a valuable tool for understanding why vegetation has changed and how it might change in the future under different climate-change scenarios. Green, orange, and dead grey junipers in red soil, mountains in background Things to Do in Missouri National Parks Things to do in Missouri national parks. This page also contains Plan Like a Park Ranger articles for parks in the state. Purple flowers bloom on a grass-covered landscape under a partly cloudy sky. Series: Things to Do in Midwest National Parks There is something for everyone in the Midwest. See what makes the Great Plains great. Dip your toes in the continent's inland seas. Learn about Native American heritage and history. Paddle miles of scenic rivers and waterways. Explore the homes of former presidents. From the Civil War to Civil Rights, discover the stories that shape our journey as a nation. Steep bluff with pink sky above and yellow leaves below.

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