"Musket fire" by NPS , public domain

Palo Alto Battlefield

National Historical Park - Texas

Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park near Brownsville, Texas preserves the grounds of the May 8, 1846, Battle of Palo Alto. It was the first major conflict in a border dispute that soon precipitated the Mexican–American War. The United States Army victory here made the invasion of Mexico possible. The historic site portrays the battle and the war, and its causes and consequences, from the perspectives of both the United States and Mexico. A half-mile trail leads to an overlook of the battlefield and includes interpretive panels.

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Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/paal/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palo_Alto_Battlefield_National_Historical_Park Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park near Brownsville, Texas preserves the grounds of the May 8, 1846, Battle of Palo Alto. It was the first major conflict in a border dispute that soon precipitated the Mexican–American War. The United States Army victory here made the invasion of Mexico possible. The historic site portrays the battle and the war, and its causes and consequences, from the perspectives of both the United States and Mexico. A half-mile trail leads to an overlook of the battlefield and includes interpretive panels. On May 8, 1846, United States and Mexican troops clashed on the prairie of Palo Alto. The battle was the first in a two-year long war that changed the map of North America. Palo Alto Battlefield National Historical Park preserves the site of this notable battle and provides an understanding of the causes, events, and consequences of the U.S.-Mexican War. The park is located on Brownsville's north side, near the city of Los Fresnos. It is just north of the intersection of FM 1847 (Paredes Line Rd.) and FM 511/FM 550. Palo Alto Visitor Center The visitor center features an exhibit area features interactive exhibits, artifacts, and Mexican War era military uniforms. The center also offers a 15-minute video—"War on the Rio Grande.” The video gives an overview of the war and is available in English and Spanish. The visitor center includes a small book store with over 100 book titles and specialty items. Don’t forget to get your national parks passport book stamped! Ask for the stamp at the front desk. Palo Alto Battlefield is located on Brownsville's north side near the city of Los Fresnos. It is located at the just north of the intersection of FM 1847 (Paredes Line Rd.) and FM 511/FM 550. Battlefield overlook Shaded structure overlooking the battlefield The overlook gives you a great view of the battlefield Rattlesnake Coiled rattlesnake ready to strike. Rattlesnakes will let you know when you get too close. Sunrise Sun rising over the battlefield Get here when the park opens and enjoy views like this. Sunset over the battlefield Sunset over the battlefield Early sunsets during winter are a sight to behold. Mexican 8-pounder Mexican 8-pounder cannon on the battlefield. A Mexican 8-pound field gun surveys the battlefield. NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site, Texas Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. Links to products from Baseline Geologic and Soil Resources Inventories provide access to maps and reports. [Site Under Development] boardwalk crosses coastal prairie Mexican War Food As can be expected, the U.S. Army ration has seen many changes since the U.S.-Mexican War. The one thing that has remained the same is the fact that soldiers will complain about and if necessary, supplement their field rations. Closeup of iron Dutch oven over hot coals. Of Mythical Importance Many of the people, places, and events of U.S. history have become the subject of popular and familiar legends. Some of these tales hold a grain of truth and some none at all. Palo Alto Battlefield generates many interesting stories as well. Most of the tales linked to the site are true. Some are partly true. Others are myths and unfounded rumors. Have you been misinformed? Color lithograph of Grant and Lee at Appomattox. Women in the U.S.-Mexican War Women left their mark on the U.S.-Mexican War. On the home front and on the battlefront, north and south of the Rio Grande, women served their nation in a variety of ways. Female living historian dressed as a camp follower. Soldier Pastimes In 1846, thousands of U.S. and Mexican soldiers left the comforts of home to fight in the Mexican War. Many came looking for action and ended up battling a different enemy –boredom. Color lithograph of the U.S. Army of Occupation at Corpus Christi, TX. Module Conducts Wildland-Urban Interface Projects Throughout the Intermountain Region In 2013, the Saguaro Wildland Fire Module (WFM) managed multiple projects simultaneously in AZ, TX, and NM. WFMs are highly skilled and versatile fire crews that provide expertise in long-term planning, ignitions, holding, prescribed fire preparation and implementation support, hazardous fuels reduction, and fire effects monitoring. With their help, fire fulfills its natural or historic role to meet resource and management objectives and create fire-adapted communities. Lock, Stock, & Barrel In the hands of U.S. and Mexican soldiers, the flintlock musket was both a giver and taker of life. An instrument of war made of wood and steel, it was often the only thing standing between an early grave or living another day. Living historian firing a flintlock musket. Texas Tortoise Monitoring at Palo Alto Battlefield Palo Alto Battlefield and the Gulf Coast Inventory & Monitoring Network began development of the tortoise monitoring project in 2008. The project is part of a service-wide program to keep a close eye on parks with significant natural resources. The goal of this inventory and monitoring program is to help identify significant environmental issues in National Parks and address them before they reach a severe stage. Looking down on a Texas tortoise Virtual Junior Ranger Visiting Palo Alto Battlefield offers great learning experiences, but right now it’s not possible to visit the park in person. Fortunately, you can still connect with us from wherever you are! Check out the activities below and take a “field trip” through our website. Junior Ranger bucket hat with Junior Ranger badges on it Mexican War Medicine We often take for granted everyday conveniences. Half of the things in your medicine cabinet would probably have been considered a medical marvel by a Mexican War era doctor. If you can’t find it in your medicine cabinet, chances are you can easily find something at a nearby supermarket or convenience store that can bring relief to most common ailments. Medical kit case in Red Cross colors. Vegetation Management at Palo Alto Battlefield Palo Alto Battlefield is working to reverse some of the 20th Century activities. These activities have altered the physical environment and continue to harm the historic character of the battlefield. However, the park has the opportunity to restore or lessen altered landscapes on the core battlefield. Developing a comprehensive and integrated vegetation management plan would allow the park to fulfill its legislative mandate of preserving the historic character of site. People using tools to plant cordgrass plugs. Resacas Long forgotten meanders of the Rio Grande, called resacas scar the landscape of both units of Palo Alto Battlefield NHP. The very river that played such a pivotal role in the U.S.-Mexican War. The very river that played such a pivotal role in the war had already left its mark on the sites long before the first shot was fired. Wooden deck overlooking the water in a resaca The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg Bird Monitoring at Palo Alto Battlefield Palo Alto Battlefield is known for its bird diversity. The park is home to several unique habitats providing birds a wealth of habitat types and food sources. Despite being a small park, Palo Alto Battlefield supports resident bird species and provides habitat for migratory species. Red summer tanager bird on a branch. The Changing War Begun as a purely military effort with the limited political objectives of reunification (North) or independence (South), the Civil War transformed into a social, economic and political revolution with unforeseen consequences. As the war progressed, the Union war effort steadily transformed from a limited to a hard war; it targeted not just Southern armies, but the heart of the Confederacy's economy, morale, and social order-the institution of slavery. Woodcut of spectators watching a train station set fire by Sherman's troops War Towns Between 1846 and 1850, hundreds of U.S. communities adopted names of battles, people, and places inspired by the U.S.-Mexican War. Some got their names from returning soldiers who wished to celebrate their deeds. In other cases, communities got their names from ordinary citizens who wanted to show their patriotism. All got their names from people who wanted to connect themselves and their places to an important national event. Color lithograph of of the city of Mexico, Audrian Co., Missouri 1869. Six Unusual Abraham Lincoln Facts and Rumors, Part II Facts 4-6 of Unusual and Unknown Lincoln Facts. President Abraham Lincoln National Park Service Commemoration of the 19th Amendment In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th Amendment the National Park Service has developed a number of special programs. This includes online content, exhibits, and special events. The National Park Service’s Cultural Resources Geographic Information Systems (CRGIS) announces the release of a story map that highlights some of these programs and provides information for the public to locate and participate. Opening slide of the 19th Amendment NPS Commemoration Story Map Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Clay Pipe Mystery One of the more interesting artifacts on display at the Palo Alto Battlefield Visitor Center is a fragment of a clay pipe. The pipe bowl is largely intact and portrays a locomotive, fuel car and passenger car. Clay pipe with locomotive imprinted on it. Top Ten Tips for Visiting Palo Alto Battlefield Planning a visit to Palo Alto Battlefield? We think these tips will help you have a fun, memorable, and safe visit to the only unit of the National Park Service that interprets the U.S.-Mexican War. Replica light blue artillery piece overlooking the coastal prairie. Grant at Fort Donelson By 1862, Grant was a brigadier-general commanding over 27,000 troops. Grant decided to attack Fort Donelson to achieve his goal of capturing the Confederate stronghold of Nashville. Two story building with a porch on the first and second floors; two red brick chimneys on the side. Hydrology at Palo Alto Battlefield Palo Alto Battlefield is located within the Rio Grande Delta. It is a landscape characterized by low ridges and shortened meanders of former channels of the Rio Grande. These meanders, called resacas, once functioned as part of a vast distributary network during times of flood. Flooding on the coastal prairie after a recent heavy rain. Restoring the Cultural Landscape at Palo Alto Battlefield I will talk today about our efforts to restore the cultural landscape and how it impacts our visitor experience. Palo Alto Battlefield is the only national park that is dedicated to preserving and interpreting sites associated.with the US Mexican War, 1846 to 1848. Right now we have a Palo Alto Battlefield and Resaca de la Palma Battlefield and there is legislation in Congress to expand our boundary to include the earthen ruins of Fort Brown. Lithograph depicts Mexican and US soldiers in line formations at Palo Alto Battlefield. Grant at Lookout Mountain Although Grant considered the battle at Lookout Mountain nothing more than a small skirmish, the Union victory freed General Hooker to join the main assault on Missionary Ridge the following day and forced the Confederates to retreat to Georgia. Grant on the Eastern Front Grant’s initial assault on Petersburg ended with heavy casualties without any significant breakthroughs. Additional attempts also ended in failure. Facing a reinforced and entrenched enemy, Grant settled in for a siege, setting the stage for the longest and final major engagement of the Civil War. Rolling hills on Petersburg Battlefield today. Grant at Missionary Ridge As the sun rose on November 25, 1863, Ulysses S. Grant looked out from his field headquarters on Orchard Knob and saw his plan to take Missionary Ridge and defeat the Confederates at Chattanooga spring into action. Cannon on top of Missionary Ridge. Grant at Appomattox Court House On April 9th, General Grant and his mud-splattered staff arrived at Appomattox Court House. They were in stark contrast to General Lee in his new uniform. In a fine brick home, the two men discussed the surrender terms. Lee’s surrender was the symbolic end of the Civil War. Grant at Palo Alto Battlefield Ulysses S Grant fought on the field of Palo Alto in the first battle of the war. He fought alongside 2,300 other U.S. troops against 3,400 Mexican soldiers. Learn about his experience at this site. United States of America and Mexico are in battle on the field of Palo Alto. Staff Spotlight: Jorge Hernandez Meet Jorge Hernandez, Education and Community Engagement Coordinator with Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park. Learn how he first got involved with the National Park Service as a volunteer, his journey with NPS, and advice for youth and young adults. Profile photo of Jorge Hernandez Series: The Odyssey of Ulysses An unknown 2nd Lieutenant in the U.S.-Mexican War later resigns the army. He rejoins and goes on to become lieutenant general of all Union armies. In his first term as President of the United States, he establishes Yellowstone National Park. From his first battle to his family home to his final resting place — the saga of Ulysses S. Grant is preserved in your National Parks. Color lithograph of Grant at the capture of the city of Mexico.

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