"Leetown Battlefield and Tour Road" by NPS Park Cultural Landscapes Program , public domain

Pea Ridge

National Military Park - Arkansas

Pea Ridge National Military Park is located in northwest Arkansas near the Missouri border. The park protects the site of the Battle of Pea Ridge, fought March 7 and 8, 1862. The battle was a victory for the Union, and helped it gain control of the crucial border state of Missouri.

maps

Official visitor map of Pea Ridge National Military Park (NMP) in Arkansas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Pea Ridge - Visitor Map

Official visitor map of Pea Ridge National Military Park (NMP) in Arkansas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).Trail of Tears - Trail Map

Official visitor map of Trail of Tears National Historic Trail (NHT) in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units

Map of the U.S. National Park System. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Park Units and Regions

Map of the U.S. National Park System with Unified Regions. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).National Park System - National Heritage Areas

Map of the U.S. National Heritage Areas. Published by the National Park Service (NPS).

https://www.nps.gov/peri/index.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pea_Ridge_National_Military_Park Pea Ridge National Military Park is located in northwest Arkansas near the Missouri border. The park protects the site of the Battle of Pea Ridge, fought March 7 and 8, 1862. The battle was a victory for the Union, and helped it gain control of the crucial border state of Missouri. On March 7-8, 1862, over 23,000 soldiers fought here to decide the fate of Missouri and was a turning point of the war in the West. The 4,300 acre battlefield honors those who fought and died on these grounds. Pea Ridge was the most pivotal Civil War battle west of the Mississippi River and is one of the most intact Civil War battlefields in the United States. The entrance road is located on Highway 62, 1.3 miles east of the intersection of Highways 62 and 72. As one is driving along highway 62, watch for the brown road signs directing one to the entrance road to the parks visitor center. Pea Ridge National Military Park Visitor Center Visitor Center is open to the public with a capacity of 25 people from 10 AM to 3 PM, Wednesday through Sunday when the 7-day rolling average of new COVID-19 cases in Benton County is in the moderate to low risk category. For more information you may call 479-451-8122. When you drive into the park, on the entrance road off of Highway 62, you will see trees on either side of the paved road. As you continue to drive slowly along this entrance road, on your left side the trees will open to a large grassy yard. Just beyond the yard is a large barn like brown building. This building is the visitor center. You will slow down and turn to your left, between to large rock and cement signs that read Pea Ridge National Military Park. Elkhorn Tavern A reconstructed Elkhorn Tavern. Used as a field hospital during the Battle of Pea Ridge, the Elkhorn Tavern is a focal point on the Pea Ridge National Military Park. Park Tour Road in Fall Photo of road with trees on both sides of road. Trees have Fall Foliage Park tour road in the fall. Sunset and Green Tree's Photo of the rays of sunshine, shining though dark green trees, with long shadows falling on grass Photo taken at sunset showing the deep green trees. Silent Field Photo of sun setting over the golden grass the battlefield. Silent Field is a photo that shows the sun setting over the golden grass of the battlefield. Men fought and died in this field, on a cold day in March of 1862. Rededication to the Elkhorn Tavern Photo of Union Union artilleryman reenactors standing in front of building. Photo of Union Union artilleryman reenactors standing in front of the Elkhorn Tavern for the rededication of the building. Park Ranger and Cannon Crew Photo of Park Ranger talking about cannon and Cannon Crew. Ranger Troy Banzhaf giving information about 6 lb. cannon and cannon crew. Union Cannons Photo of Union cannons and crew firing cannons in a field. Photo of Union artilleryman reenactors standing in Cox's field firing cannon's on the 150th Anniversary of the Battle of Pea Ridge. Union Infantry 150th Photo of Union Infantrymen reenactors standing in front of building with large crowd. Photo of Union Infantrymen reenactors standing in front of the Elkhorn Tavern, with large crowd during demonstration on the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Pea Ridge. . Wildland Fire in Arkansas' National Parks Wildland fire impacts each of the national parks in Arkansas in one way or another. The National Park Service manages wildland fire to protect the public; park communities and infrastructure; conserve natural and cultural resources; and maintain and restore natural ecosystem processes. A prescribed fire is monitored by a firefighter on an all-terrain vehicle. Commemorative Cultural Landscapes of the Midwest Behind the scenes at every NPS memorial site, a team of preservation professionals works to plan, design, and specify the type of treatment that is needed to preserve the physical place and the associated memories. Here are just a few examples of commemorative landscapes in the Midwest Region along with their treatment documents. Trees line both sides of a rectangular plaza of short grass, leading towards a tall flagpole. Death and Dying The somber aftermath of Civil War battles introduced Americans--North and South--to death on an unprecedented scale and of an unnatural kind, often ending in an unmarked grave far from home. Neither individuals, nor institutions, nor governments were prepared to deal with death on such a massive scale, for never before or since have we killed so many of our own. The Civil War revolutionized the American military's approach to caring for the dead, leading to our modern cult Photo of freshly buried marked and unmarked graves near Petersburg, Va. Grassland Management - Restoring Iconic Landscapes and Species A grasslands restoration project at Pea Ridge National Military Park helps rebuild bobwhite quail habitat, while also encouraging a larger grasslands restoration movement across other national parks. Large flames engulf a section of overgrown grasses and shrubs at Pea Ridge National Military Park. Wildland Fire in Oak Woodlands and Savannas of the Midwestern United States Oak woodlands depend on disturbances like fire to survive. Frequent fire created and maintained the open structure and make-up of the woodlands. Today, there are fewer oak woodlands across the central United States. Oak woodlands are converting into forests due to a lack of fire. Oak trees with an understory of grasses and forbs. The Border States The existence of divided populations in Border States had a profound impact on Union and Confederate strategy-both political and military. Each side undertook military and political measures--including brutal guerilla warfare-- in their attempts to control areas of divided loyalty and hostile moral and political views held by local civilians. Painting showing removal of Missouri civilians from their homes by Union troops NPS Geodiversity Atlas—Pea Ridge National Military Park, Arkansas Each park-specific page in the NPS Geodiversity Atlas provides basic information on the significant geologic features and processes occurring in the park. [Site Under Development] tavern in winter The Civilian Experience in the Civil War After being mere spectators at the war's early battles, civilians both near and far from the battlefields became unwilling participants and victims of the war as its toll of blood and treasure grew year after year. In response to the hardships imposed upon their fellow citizens by the war, civilians on both sides mobilized to provide comfort, encouragement, and material, and began to expect that their government should do the same. Painting of civilians under fire during the Siege of Vicksburg Exploring the Fire and Archeology Interface The Midwest Archeological Center (MWAC) worked with Midwest Region Fire Program to design and carry out experiments to collect information about the effects of fire on various classes of archeological materials. The goals of this project were to assess the fire/archeology interface to provide managers of Midwestern parks with information that will aid in decision-making concerning the stewardship of archeological and natural resources. Aquatic Invertebrate Monitoring at Pea Ridge National Military Park Scientists track aquatic invertebrates to assess water quality. Invertebrates include insect larvae, worms, crayfish, and other animals without backbones. Winton Spring Branch at Pea Ridge National Military Park Vegetation Community Monitoring at Pea Ridge National Military Park Rolling hills and broad uplands scatter the land of Northwest Arkansas. Pea Ridge National Military Park has restored prairies, open woodlands, closed woodlands, and oak-hickory forests. Pea Ridge National Military Park Bird Community Monitoring at Pea Ridge National Military Park Birds are an important part of the world we live in. They eat pests, disperse seeds, pollinate plants, feed us, and provide us with activities. Barred Owl in a tree at Pea Ridge National Military Park Deer Monitoring at Pea Ridge National Military Park As deer numbers continue to rise at the park, so too does the threat of disease, damage to the park’s landscape, and collisions with deer on nearby highways. A deer at Pea Ridge National Military Park. James A. Garfield and the “Yankee Dutchman”: Maj. Gen. Franz Sigel Major General Franz Sigel and James A. Garfield met each other in 1862. General Garfield's letters during the Civil War were put into a book called, The Wild Life of the Army: Civil War Letters of James A. Garfield. This article will examine the relationship and admiration Garfield had for a fellow Union officer. Franz Sigel Series: National Park Service Geodiversity Atlas The servicewide Geodiversity Atlas provides information on <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geoheritage-conservation.htm">geoheritage</a> and <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/geodiversity.htm">geodiversity</a> resources and values all across the National Park System to support science-based management and education. The <a href="https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1088/index.htm">NPS Geologic Resources Division</a> and many parks work with National and International <a href="https://www.nps.gov/subjects/geology/park-geology.htm">geoconservation</a> communities to ensure that NPS abiotic resources are managed using the highest standards and best practices available. park scene mountains Series: African American History at Gettysburg Abraham Brian, Basil Biggs, James Warfield, and Mag Palm are just a few of the many individuals that were affected by the Civil War and the Battle of Gettysburg, and each has their own story to tell. We have collected their stories in one place so that you can learn more about their various trials during this tumultuous time in American history. A black and white photograph of a black family posing with a white man and his horse in a dirt road. Peach Orchard at Pea Ridge National Military Park At the time of the Civil War Battle of Pea Ridge, the landscape consisted of woodlands, small settlements, and farms. Crop land and orchards supported residents’ needs. Peach trees were cultivated by European settlers as well as Native American tribes. Today, Pea Ridge National Military Park maintains a demonstration peach orchard of 46 trees at Ford Farm, adding to the appearance and interpretation of the historic context. A row of peach trees surrounded by grass in an orchard. Pea Ridge Online Jr. Ranger Activity Printable kids activity. Union Solider talking with kids.

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